100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 20, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1956

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

"

IHEEDi

1

Three University of North Caro-
lina male students escaped charges
resulting from a panty raid by the
skin of their teeth.
The three could not, be charged
with disturbing students of a wom-
en's college due to the legal tech-
nicality that the University of
North Carolina is not classed as a
women's college.
University of Texas officials ord-
ered Delta Sigma Phi fraternity
off campus because of hazing prac-
tices which allegedly caused injury
to a student.
The chapter was ordered to close
its house and disband before the
end of March.
The action resulted from com-
plaints of C. W. Earney of Austin
that his 24 year old son suffered
temporary paralysis w h e n he
crashed into a trophy case during
"hell week."

THE Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication. Notices
for the Sunday edition must be in by
2 p.m. Friday.
TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1956 j
VOL. LXVIII, NO. 31
General Notices
President and Mrs. Hatcher will hold
open house for students at their home
Wed., March 21, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.j
Regents' Meeting: Fri., April 20, Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Thurs., April 12.
Student Activities Building: Notice to
all recognized organizations. Prelimi-
nary information relating to need for
Contest Judges
Judges for the Union's "Name
the Snack Bar Contest" have been
announced.

71

space in the Student Activities Building
now under construction is requested
from recognized student organizations.
Questionnaires have been mailed to
presidents of all registered organizations.
They are to be returned to the Office
of Student Affairs, 1020 Administration
Building by Wed., March 21. Additional
copies are available in that office. Any
recognized organization which has not
received a copy of the questionnaire
is requested to call for one.
Late Permission: Because of the Mili-
tary Ball, all women students will have
1:30 a.m. late permission on Fri., March
23.
Lectures
University Lecture. "Central Asian
Influences in Chinese Painting of the
T'ang Period." Osvald Siren, Swedish
National Museum. Tues., March 20, at
4:10 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Aus-
pices of the Department of Fine Arts.
University Lecture in Journalism. Paul
A. Shinkman, Washington Correspond-
ent for Central Press Association and
Radio News Commentator for WASH-
FM and WDON will speak on "Washing-
ton News-Mill" Tues., March 20, at 3
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Concerts
String Quartet at 8:30 tonight in
Rackham Lecture Hall, by Walden
Quartet, quartet in residence at the
University of Illinois; Homer Schmitt,
violin, Bernard Goodman, violin, John
Garvey, viola, and Robert Swenson,
cello; program: Haydn's Quartet, Op.
77, No. 1, Walton's Quartet in A minor,
and Brahms' Quartet, Op. 51, No. 1.
Open to the general public without
charge.
University of Michigan Symphony
Band, conducted by George Cavender,
Assistant Conductor, 8:30 p.m. Wed.,
March 21, in Hill Auditorium. Works
by Rossini, Bach, Guilimant, Charpen-
tier, Franck, Reed, Mueller, Gould,
Rachmaninoff and Alford. Open to the
general public without charge.
Academic Notices
School of Business Administration:
Students seeking admission to this
School as graduate degree candidates in
the summer session or fall semester,
1956, must take the Admission Test for
Graduate Study in Business on April
14. Students currently enrolled who
have not yet taken the test must also
take it on April 14. Each individual

must make his own application to the
Educational Testing Service, Princeton,
New Jersey, to be received in that
office not later than April 1. Applica-
tions for the test and test general
information bulletins are available in
Room 150, School of Business Adminis-
tration.
School of Business Administration:
Students from other Schools and Col-
leges intending to apply for admission
for the summer session or fall semester
should secure application forms in
Room 150, School of Business Adminis-
tration. Applications should be com-
pleted and returned before April 1.
The Extension Service announces the
May Festival Lecture Series to be held
in Ann Arbor beginning Wed., March
21 as follows:
.The1956 May Festival Lecture Series,
7:00 p.m., Room 206, Burton Tower.
Prof. Glenn D. McGeoch, Instructor.
Registration for this series may be
made in Room 4501 of -the Administra-
tion Building on South State Street
during University Office hours or dur-
ing the half hour preceding the class
in the class room.
School of Business Administration:!
Faculty meeting on Wed., March 21, 3:00
p.m., in Room 146.
Architecture and Design students may
not drop courses without record after
5:00 p.m. Fri., March 23. Architecture
and Design students who have incom-
pletes incurred during the fall semester,
must remove them by Fri., March 23.
Preliminary Examinations in English:
Applicants for the Ph.D. in English who
expect to take the preliminary exami-
nations this spring are requested to
leave their names with Dr. Ogden, 1634
Haven Hall. The "old style" examina-
tions will be given as follows: English
Literature from the Beginnings to 1550,
Tues., April 10; English Literature, 1550-
1750, Sat., April 14; English Literature,
1750-1950, Tues., April 17; and American
Literature, Sat., Aril 21. The "new
style" examinations will be given as
follows: English and American Litera-
ture, 1550-1660, Tues., April 10; 1660-
1780, Sat., April 14; 1780-1870, Tues.,
April 17; and 1870-1950, Sat., April 21.
The examinations will be given in
Angell Hall, Room 2203, from 9 a.m, to
12.
Psychology Colloquium: Dr. James
Olds, of the Psychology Department,
McGill University, will discuss "Neuro-
physiological Mechanisms of Reward,"
Tues., March 20, 4:15 p.m., Angell, Aud.
B.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
SPORT GOODS
GOLF BALLS
$4.85 dozen, reg. $9.00 value (repro-
cessed). Anything and everything for
the golferlI Bob Applegate's Golf &
Gift Mart, 200 N. 4th Ave. NO 3-4829.
Open 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. )168
FOR SALE
MEN'S SCHWINN BICYCLE, good con-
dition. Reasonable. Phone NO 5-5349.
)160B
ARMY, NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)123B
HELP WANTED
MATURE ENGINEER to do architectur-
al porcelain enamel layout, field work,
and handle office work. An excellent/
opportunity to grow with a new in-
dustry. Salary commensurate with
ability. Phone 3-2407. )93H
PROFESSIONAL Girl Scout position
open for field director. Beginning May
1. Bachelor's degree, group and camp-
ing experience reciuired. Month's va-
cation with pay, plus other benefits.
Call NO 3-1309, mornings. )90H
WANTED-Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting; Call NO 2-3241.
)84H
WANTED-Cab drivers full or part time.
Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70H
BUSINESS SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING-Manuscripts,
law briefs, term papers, desertations,
etc. NO 2-5757. )38J
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Automatic Rolleifiex F3.5 Xenar Lens
with MX Sync. Like-New. $155.
Complete Camera Repair Service
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)40S

USED CARS
BEST BUYS
1951 Ford 8 cylnder, 2 door, overdrive.
1950 Fords-6 and 8 cylinder motors,
choice of body styles.
1951 Studebaker coupes-choice of two.
Really economical.
1953 Ford Ranch Wagon, 8 cylinder.
Plus a wide selection of '52 through '55
models, all makes.
HERB ESTES
INC.
Your Ford Dealer

USED CARS
'52 Ford Stationwagon
Red. Country Squire. Four door. New
tubeless whitewall tires. Excellent
condition throughout. Radio, heater
many extras. Phone NO 8-8142. )134N
1951 GREEN HILLMAN MINX 4-Door,
excellent condition, low mileage, $375.
Call NO 3-1933 after 6 P.M. )137N
FOR SALE-1950 Tu-Dor custom Ford.
Good condition, reasonable. NO 3-4551,
John Dudar, 734 E. University. )136N
PERSONAL
WHY NOT enjoy Life? Especially at 8c
a copy-and that ain't no misprint l
Student Periodical, 2-361. )119F
CONVERT your double-breasted suit to/
a new single-breasted model. $15.
Double-breasted tuxedos converted to
single-breasted, $18, or new silk shawl
collar, $25. Write to Michaels Tailor-
ing Co., 1425 Broadway, Detroit, Michi-
gan, for free details or phone
WOodward 3-5776. )118F
TRANSPORTATION
NEED A RIDE into northwest side of
Detroit every Friday after 4 P.M. Call
Diane, NO 3-5032. )44G
RbOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOMS for men, $8. One block
from Ad building. NO 2-6491, evenings,
)35D

Phone NO 2-3261

505 E. Huron

University President Harlan
Hatcher, Assistant Dean of Men
John Bingley and T. Hawley Tap-
ping, president of the Alumni As-
sociation, will decide which of the
names submitted will be given to
the new snack bar and win its
donor a $100 scholarship.

'I,
w

Open evenings until 9
)120N
Shop The Rest
Then Buy
The Best
at the BIG NEW Lot'
3345 Washtenaw
(near Pittsfield)
ALL OUR CARS INCLUDE
1956 LICENSE PLATES
1955 BUICK-Super Riviera Hardtop,
fully equipped. Save that first
year's depreciation . . . $2595.
1955 MERCURY - Monterey sedan, all
the extras, like new, only $2195.
1954 MERCURY-Monterey sedan, fully
equipped, sharp, $1495.
1951 LINCOLN-Cosmo sedan, a lot of
car for $575.
1950 MERCURY -- Fordor, overdrive,
radio and heater, nice at $395.
MANY MORE-Sharp late models -
1955 and 1956 Fords. 1953 Mercurys,
etc. All with WRITTEN LIFETIME
GUARANTEE.
Fitzgerald
LincoIn -- Mercury
3345 Washtenaw Rd.
Phone NO 3-4197

p

i
^y.

Read
Daily
Class ifijeds

I

Fill In The Answer

,.:

i

7-i

I

Open Evenings Till 8
TRANSPORTATION -- $50, '47 Chevie
coupe, call NO 3-2090 after 6. )128N
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly, $95.
1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey, real
clean and low mileage, $445.
1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, heater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-wall tires and like new, $745.
19°0 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio,
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, First at Washington
Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495
)130N

Fountain Pens C
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies "a
Typewriters
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
MORRI LL'S.1
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO 3-2481

_.

I

I

a.

k

(Well sir, one summer Sigafoos lost his entire fortune gam-
bling at the casino, and he was seriously contemplating suicide
when a ray of hope appeared in an unexpected quarter. It seems
that Sigafoos, through the international stamp collectors jour-
nal, had long been in correspondence with a girl in Java, a
mission-educated savage named Lotus Petal McGinnis, herself
an enthusiastic stamp collector. The nature of their correspond-
ence, though friendly, had been entirely philatelic. Now, sud-
denly, a new kind of letter came from Lotus Petal. She declared
that although she had never laid eyes on Sigafoos, she loved
him and wanted to marry him. She said she was eighteen years
old, beautiful, and her father, the richest man in his tribe, would
give hialf his fortune to the husband of her choice. Sigafoos,
in his reduced circumstances, had no alternative; he sold his
last few belongings and booked passage for Java.
(The first sight of his prospective bride failed to delight
Sigafoos. She was, as she said, beautiful - but only by local
standards. Sigafoos had serious doubts that her bright red
pointed teeth and the chicken bones hanging from her ear lobes
would be considered chic along the Champs Elysees.
(But sobering as was the sight of Lotus Petal, S.igafoos had
an even greater disappointment coming when he met her father.
The old gentleman was, as Lotus Petal had represented, the
richest man in his tribe, but, unfortunately, th4 medium of ex-
change in his tribe was prune pits.
(Sigafoos took one look at the mound of prune pits which
was his dowry, gnashed his teeth, and stomped off into the
jungle, swearing vilely and kicking at sticks and stones and
whatever else lay in his path. Stomping thus, swearing thus,
kicking thus, Sigafoos kicked over a heap of old bones which -
what do you know ! - turned out to be the skull and shin of
Pithecanthropus Erectus.)
But I digress ... From the brutish Pithecanthropus, man
evolved slowly upward, growing more intelligent and resource-
ful. By the Middle Paleolithic period man had invented the
leash, which was a remarkable technical achievement, but
frankly not terribly useful until the Mesolithic period when man

I

'I

11

I

HILLEL BARN DANCE
S a U I i U A E , iL1

i

It a IhIEKJ. "' UNU oVrali 11I

U

... . .,.. .c.. v: . : .... ......: ::: ®

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan