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March 18, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-18

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SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE !

SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

JAY GOOLD JERRY KARPINKA
.. .left wing ... center

DON McINTOSH CAPT. BILL McFARLAND
...,left wing ... center

TOM RENDALL DICK DUNNIGAN
... right wing ... right wing

NEIL McDONALD
... center

Wolverines

Defeat

ech

for

NCAA

Hockey

LORNE HOWES
.. . goalie
Title

CAGE TOURNEYS:
Iowa Defeats Kentucky;
NIT Pro Playoffs Open

jlcers NotchSixt Title;
c = - IrIt1- w ai^ mo AA rr i - -+

Owen, O'Reilly Capture
Firsts At Denison Relays
(Continued from Page 1)

By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY
Big Ten Champion Iowa got a
terrific performance from bouncy
Carl Cain last night and sailed
past Kentucky, 89-77, to win the
NCAA regional basketball tourney.
Cain scored 34 points but it was
his timed spurts and tremendous
aerial antics around both baskets
which led Iowa to victory.
PHILADELPHIA
At Philadelphia, Hal (King)
Lear, bottled up almost all night
by Canisius' guarding, hooped two
fouls with two seconds to play last
night to give Temple University a
60-58 victory over Canisius.
LAWRENCE
Southern Methodist broke the
halter early in the game and raced
to a 84-63 victory over Oklahoma
City University at Lawrence, Kan-
sas.

NIT
ions outdid Oklahoma A&M on de-
fense and shook All-America Si
Green loose in the second half to
gain a 69-61 victory in the National
Invitation Basketball Tournament
yesterday.
In other NIT games Seton Hall,
the 1953 winner, ripped defenseless
Marquette, 96-78 and St. Francis
of-Brooklyn beat Lafayette, 85-74.
Xavier of Ohio upset .St. Louis!
84-80.
NBA
BOSTON
Boston defeated Syracuse 100-93
yesterday in the first game. of
their Eastern Division playoffs of
the NBA at Boston.
ST. LOUIS
At St. Louis, the St. Louis Hawks
came from behind to nip the
Minneapolis Lakers, 116-115.

Switzer Scor
(Continued from Page 1)
throughout the game, and the pace
but the pressure began to tell on
the players late in the game.
Michigan jumped off to an early
lead when Switzer blasted a shot
from the blue line in the opening
minute of the game that darted
past the surprised McManus. Tech
- gained the equalizer a few min-
utes later when sophomore Dick
Wilson beat Howes with a close-in
shot.
The teams continued to play at
this nip and tuck pace throughout
HAYES ALAN JENKINS the period, and Michigan held a
. . olympic champ slim 4-3 lead going into the second,
period.
Olympic figure skating cham- Spurred on by its large and noisy
pion Hayes Alan Jenkins, and contingent of fans, the Huskies
his brother David will appear in regained the lead in the opening
the Ann Arbor Figure Skating minutes of the period. Tom Ken-
Club Carnival today. They will nedy and Aubry each maneuvered
appear in a special exhibition the pellet past Howes, and Tech
I this evening at 6:15. led 5-4.
Shortly afterward, Switzer play-
ing probably the best series of his
R1angers ose career, tied it up for Michigan, and
set the stage for his own game
In NH1 Tilt"1inning goal later in the period.
Late in the second period both'
By The Associated Press squads suffered serious blows to
The Montreal Canadiens spotted their chances when the Wolver-,
New York two goals last night andfmes Rendall and Tech's Stenlund
then romped to a 7-2 victory. The
loss cost the Rangers any chance World Recordi
of an undisputed second place BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (P) --
finish in the National Hockey Mike Agostini, Fresno State
League. ieAosfi ren tt
e sophomore, ran the 224 yard
At Toronto, Gus Mortson scored dash yesterday in 20.1 seconds
on a 40-foot blast in the third and bettered Mel Patton's world
period to give the Chicago Black mark.
Hawks a 1-1 tie with Toronto.

were banished from the game for
fighting in a mixup behind thej
Tech goal. Other than for this
brief flurry, both teams held their
tempers well in check.
Named to the, second AP -all-!
star team were goalie Sarge Whit-
tier, and forwards Bill Renner and
Bill McLean of St. Lawrence, I
Stenlund, Tattersall, and Cliff.
Wylie of Tech.
Howes, in addition to a shoulder ;
injury, was playing with bone
chips in his elbow. This injury
was suffered by the Michigan net-
minder in Friday night's action,
with St. Lawrence.
STATISTICS
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring-i-Michigan-
Switzer (McDonald) 0:23; 1-Mci
gan Tech-Wilson (J. McManus) 2:42;
2-Michigan-McDonald (Schiller) 9:22;
3-Michigan-McIntosh (Rendall) 10:14;
2-Michigan Tech-Aubry (unassisted)
11:04;4-Michigan-Schiller (McDon-
Said) (13:11; 3-Michigan Tech-Wilson
(unassisted) 19:45.
Penalties:. Michigan - Pitts (interfer-I
ence) 10:23; Michigan Tech-Cuculic
(illegal check) 12:22.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring-4-Michi-
gan Tech-Kennedy (Wilson) 4:47; 5-
Michigan Tech-Aubry (Wilson) 7:15;
5-Michigan-Switzer (Hanna) 7:58; 6-
Michigan-Switzer (Dunnigan) 14:38;
7 - Michigan - McDonald (unassisted)
14:49.
Penalties-- Michigan - Switzer (illegal
check) V~9; Schiller (slashing) 6:58;
Karpinka (roughing) 1903; Rendall
(game misconduct) 19:03. Michigan
Tech-Wylie (high sticking) 4;01;
Kennedy (tripping) 7:44; Stenlund
(elbowing) 12:43; Stenlund (game{
misconduct) 19:03.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring-none.
Penalties: none. 0

les after winning both of his pre-
liminary and semi-final heats.
Also last night, Michigan con-
testants took three places in the
81st Annual Scottish Regiment
Highlander's Meet at Hamilton,
Ontario.
George Gluppe carried off top
Wolverine laurels with a third in
the 300 yard dash. He led until

the final ten yards when he was
passed by Olympic star Andy Stan-
field and Fred Bowens of the New
York Pioneer Club.
.Don Matheson finished fourth
in the 600-yard run. Cam Gray
got Michigan's other place with a
fourth in the 1000-yard run.
John Moule, Michigan freshman
coach, was 25 yards behind George
King of New York University in
the mile but still finished second,
-- - -

vs l uree.

I

(

The Farm Cupboard
OPEN and ready

is now
to serve you!

FAMILY STYLE DINNERS
S Chicken

ED SWITZER
.. hat trick
'M' Riflemen
Win Tourney
Michigan's sharpshooters swept
the National Intercollegiate Rifle
Tournament's seventeen team sec-
tional meet at the Air Force Range
yesterday.
Tom Athanas' score of 289 out
of 300 was just enough to win the
morning's close-contested individ-
ual competition.
The Wolverines' number one
squad copped the afternoon round
of team shooting mainly through
the efforts of the Gogulsky broth-
ers. Paul 287 and Jan's 286 were
leading contributors.
Fountain Pens
School Supplies
Typewriters
Chairs
Electric
Standard
Portable
Desks - Files
Comptometer Dictation Machines
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO 3-2481

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Steaks

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Chops
1S

R' II

HOMESTYLE COOKINQ
FARM CUPBOARD
5400 PLYMOUTH RD. - DIXBORO, MICH.
N. Main right on U.S. 12 Phone NO 8-9387
Saturday and Sunday open 1 1 A.M. - 10 P.M.
Closed Monday.

THE Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication. Notices
for the Sunday edition must be in by
2 p.m. Friday.
SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 1956
VOL. LXVIII, NO. 30
t~in ra 1 Not r e

but not travel. Economics, Geography,
Mathematics, Medieval History, Philos-
ophy, Political Science, and Romance
Languages especially appropriate fields
of study. Further information is avail-
able at the office of the Graduate
School and applications should be filed
before April 15.
Lectures
University Lecture in Journalism. Paul
A. Shinkman, Washington Correspond-
ent for Central Press Association and
Radio News Commentator for WASH-

FM and WDON, "Washington News-
President and Mrs. Hatcher will hold Mill" Tues., March 20, at 3 p.m., Rack-
open house for students at their home ham Amphitheater.
Wed., March 21, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Lecture, auspices of the School of
Women Students-Weekend guests at Social Work and the Huron Valley
Swimming Pool. Women students who Chapter, National Association of Social
have an occasional guest from out-of- Workers. "Social Welfare in Burma."
town for the weekend may invite their Daw Mya Seip, lecturer, University of
guest to swim during the co-recreational Rangoon and U Nu Lecturer in Burmese
swimming hours at the Women's Pool: Culture in the U.S. Mon., March 19,
Sat., 7:15-9:15 p.m.; Sun., 3:00-5:00 p.m. 7-8:30 p.m., Henderson Room, Michigan
League. Open lecture.
The Queen's University, Belfast, Ire-
land, again offers, through a reciprocal Lecture, auspices of the Depts. of Fine
arrangement with the University of Arts and Near Eastern Studies. "Armen-
Michigan, an exchange Scholarship for ian Illuminated Manuscripts of the
a graduate from the University of 13th Century," Prof. Sirarpie Der Ner-
Michigan, which will provide fees, board sessian, Harvard Univearsity, Dumbar-
and lodging for the next academic year, ton Oaks Research Library and Collec-«

tion, Washington, D.C. Mon., March 19,
4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
University Lecture. "Central Asian
Influences in Chinese Painting /of the
T'ang Period." Osvald Siren, Swedish
National Museum. Tues., March 20, at
4:10 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall. Aus-
pices of the Department of Fine Arts. _
Concerts
Organ 'Music by Bach, performed by
Robert Noehren, University Organist, at
4:15 today in Hill Auditorium. Fantasia
and Fugue in A minor, eight Chorale
Preludes, Trio-Sonata No. 2 in C minor,
Toccata and Fugue in E major, and
Prelude and Fugue in F minor. Open
to the public.
Faculty Concert, 8:30 tonight in Aud.
A, Angell Hall. Arlene Sollenberger,
contralto, Eugene Bossart, pianist, as-
sisted by Nelson Hauenstein, flutist, in
compositions by Handel, Bloch, Strauss
and Mussorgsky. Open to the general
public without charge.
Student Recital, 8:30 p.m. Monday,
March 19, by Carol Van Asselt, pianist,
pupil of Ava Com' Case, in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for the
degree of Master.of Music. Compositions
(Continued on Page 5)

L

r

''

.. .
,

TW

S ILLLITOeS
OFFERS

Careers in Retai9in19
for
1956 Gradu ates
BEORE MVAKITNG a final decision on your career--
investigate the opportunities for success and ad-
vancement available in the largest department store
in Cincinnati, Ohio. Shillito's is a division of Feder-
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(Associated Merchandising Corp.).
GRADUATES from top schools in America join our
company each year because Shillito's is a progressive
organization' and known to be one of America's
finest stores.

I

Pringle Holmspun
Sweater and Skirt Packs
of Shetland Yarns
Imported direct from Scotland
YARNCRAFT SHOP
Phone NO 2-0303 10 Nickels Arcade*

A frank messa~ge to/
graduating electronic and mechanical
ENGINEERS
You know it . . . we know it . . . so let's be frank
about it.
The demand for engineers-experienced or graduate
-far exceeds the supply./And, from now on in, you
are going to be sought after more than a triple threat
halfback for next years varsity.
You will be promised many things (including the
moon with a fence/around it), and for a young man
just getting started these things are pretty hard
to resist.
So, again, let's be frank. We at Farnsworth won't
promise youihe moon. (Although we are working
on some ideas that may eventually get you there
and back.)'We are an old, young organization. Old,
in the sense of being pioneers in the field of elec-
tronics./(Our technical director, Dr. Philo Farnsworth
invented electronic television.) Young, by being the
newest division of the world-wide International Tele-
phone and Telegraph Corporation, devoting our ef-
forits exclusively to research, development and pro-
d'uction of military and industrial electronics, and
atomic energy.
All of which makes Farnsworth big enough for sta-
bility and technical perspective, yet small enough
for mobility, flexibility and recognition of the in-
dividual. Here you will be associated with and.
encouraged by a team of eminent scientists and
engineers with many "firsts" to their credit in the
field of electronics. Here you will be heard . .. not
just one of the herd.
We earnestly invite you to hear the whole fascinating
Farnsworth story. We're pretty certain it will make
the decision for your future easier.
ON ,CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
L t _ _MAR26

-

FENER GLASS & PAINT CO.

216 W. William Street

Ann Arbor, Michigan

III

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