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March 15, 1956 - Image 16

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-15

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'S'HE MCMGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1956

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TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1956
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Coat Fabrics Change
For New Spring Line

A

-Daily-John Hirtzel
FOR SOUTHERN BEACHES-All set to paddle down the canels
of Fort Lauderdale, Connie Hills wears a turquoise Jacket and
multi-colored pastel shorts to match the hood on the jacket.
Judy Alcorn has on a new style in bathing suits, which features a
matching jacket and unusual center strap-collar.

-Daily-John Hirtzel
GOLD AND WHITE DANCE DRESS-For dancing under the
southern stars, Nancy Herkenhoff wears- a dress of, white chiffon
and golden yellow, trimmed with a large bow. A clean plastic and
gold purse and heels add a finishing touch to the outfit.

4ew Styles Will Appear at Southern Resorts

By VIRGINIA ROBERTSON
In Spring, a young college
woman's fancy lightly turns to
thoughts of . . . what else but
Spring vacation, and with (Spring
vacation, maybe even dreams of
a trip to the Southland.
Fashion designers are all pre-
pared with a new barrage of styles
for every moment in the sunnier
climes, ranging from beachware
to cocktail dresses for after-dark.
Incidently, let all unattached males
beware, for the new fashions for
1956 are bound to be beau-catchers.
Americans are born travelers
and this season provides the
springboard to vacation - bound
styles, famous for their versatility.
Bathing Suit Styles
In bathing suits, a longer suit
line is apparent, echoing the gen-
eral trend toward a slimmer sil-
houette. These beach beauties will
have less of the full-skirted and
bloomer girl look . . with more
and more of the sleek look.
As far as colors in bathing suits
go, this year they're decorator's
yellow and any shade of blue, just
the thing for a loyal University
coed.
Materials range from cotton
satin, drawn up high for the new
"undercover look" in swimsuits,
a sleek lastex in vertical awning-
strips and nubby terrycloth, with
horizonal stripes ringed high and
low around the long, long torso.
Glitter-Stripes.
A new twist in this line of styles,
finds a glitter - stripe bathing
sheath, with n o n - t a r n is h i n g
Stretchable Nylons
A new type of nilon stockings
are being produced which may
revolutionalize the stocking in-
dustry.
Besides being stretchable, this
hosiery boasts durability and sheer
beauty. They are sold with a guar-
antee of three months' wear from
every two pairs.
Besides fitting well, these stock-
ings "stay put," so that a seam
which begins straight, remains
that way while being worn.
The nylon yields to every move-
ment, yet does not stretch to the
point of bagginess.
This controlled stretch is the
result of a new method of proces-
sing and kniting into a durability
which warrants the guarantee.
The new hosiery comes in three
sizes, adaptable to all foot sizes
and lengths. Women with an "odd"
stocking size will find these ny-
lons fit both the foot and the leg.

threads that add luster to fashions
that can swim and sun and sail.
Perfect for the sun-and-spray
way of life, is a bathing suit, made.
of an exotic palm print in tropic
colors, fashioned in silm, trim
boy-shorts.
For those quick changes from
beachwear to streetwear, a suit
is being made which becomes a
glamorous patios dress when a
high-waisted skirt is added. So
very feminine, this outfit is made
of a lace-with-flowers cotton print.
Plaid Laster Suit
A favorite among bathing suit
styles last season was a black
watch plaid lastex suit, which is
again taking the fashion lead for
this year. So if coeds haven't got-
ten the "mileage" out of this suit
last year, they can consider it
again.
Keeping up the Scotch tradition,
another favorite is a blue and
white gingham check seagoing suit.
For afternoon wear in the
Sunny South, blue is the color
this year. A sleeveless tucked shirt-
waist dress is featured with shades
of watercolor blue. Turquoise is
now a clear, strong fashion color

and carries the blue hues toward
the greener side of the rainbow.
Blue and white gingham also
displays its talents in the dress
line, with a full skirt gathered on-
to a long, princess-style bodice.
Bright dotted silks and striped
linens are flourishing everywhere
under the sun, and of course,
they're any color . . . as long as
its blue.
The narrow linen dress is also
appearing earlier than ever in
the North, hiding under this year's
new spring camouflage, a little
lopped-off wool jacket.
Many Forms
Sometimes the dress appears in
black, jacketed well above the
waist by a bolero of peppery red
or black tweed. At other times, it's
a sheath of cocoa linen, again
with its abbreviated jacket, tersely
tailored of cocoa and white check-
ed tweed.
Another version of the sheath
is a pale blue, linen dress with a
sleeved jacket of white jersey,
sprigged *ith blue embroidery.
North or South, the polka dot
appears in after-sundown, bare
shoulder styles. A favorite style
is a peacock blue polka-dotted silk,

scalloped below an indented waist,
let out in a short swinging skirt.
Blue Streak
The blue streak, takes turns
with the pastel family in a multi-
colored evening dress of pleaded
celenese jersey under a blue cam-
isol top.
A camisole top sundress, for
afternoons or evenings, comes in
a black and white miniature tat-
tersal with gold banding on wrink-
le-resistant cotton. The billowing
skirt is banded with golden bord-
ers.
Fabric-wise, a real Irish linen
is coming into prominence, with
its softly crisp texture, its talent
for washing like a hankie and its
wrinkle-resistant q u a i t i e s by
which it can hang out fresh over-
night.
Rayon weaves are also appearing
with a light, crisp hinting of tex-
ture which sets a trend toward a
fragile look in contemporary styles.
And last, but not least, for the
"ultra-ultra" in spring fashions,
there is a tiered-lace sheath dress,
with a scalloped and low-scooped
neck line and an enormous, crisp
bow of dark aqua taffeta tied in
the back.

By ROSE PERLBERG
"Cloth Maketh the Coat," or so
the saying goes and all the smart
fabrics are textured in different
ways that definitely date them t
Spring, 1956.
Fashion has moved away from
coarse bold surfaces to lightly
textured, often delicate, but flat-
ter surfaces.
Looking at the coat world, one
finds that several new trends have
come upon the scene and appear
here to stay.
Apart from concentration on
texture, a second innovation is
the rapid development of blended
fabrics.
The blend business began five
or six years ago when French silk
makers started to bring out spec-
ial fabrics for Dior suits, and it
has rapidly advanced to popu-
larity.
Material's Finish Changes
Another change deals directly
with the appearance and texture
of coatings. An effort has been
made to finish them in a some-
what drier and crisper manner.
Already popular among top French,
British and Italian master-makers,
this fashion has strongly influ-
enced American fabric design for
Spring, 1956.
The strong interest in texture
turns the spotlight towards the
large and varied family of home-
spun coatings, which have reach-
ed the number one spot.
Although almost first cousins
to tweeds, from which they derive
much of their acceptance, home-
spuns are simpler in weave than
tweeds with styling and texture
distinctively their own.
Encompassing the linen look in
finer yarns, basket weaves in med-;
ium weights, and the burlap look
in coarser yarns, homespuns may
appear bulky but they are actually
lightweight.
Homespuns First
Following a trend that has been
strong in Paris and Italy for the
past several years, homespuns this
year are steering toward a drier,
crisper finish that sometimes has
almost a polished look, but is
still pleasing to the touch.
First place in homespun colors
falls to the beiges with navy blue
a close runner up. All shades of
lighter blue from turquoise to
clear pastel place third in the color
parade, with red fourth,
Pink, which has taken quite a
tumble from last year's popularity
heights, follows with soft pastel
colors bringing up the rear.
The lacy look in coatings "has
arrived," so to speak, and, fash-
ion-wise, is second to homespuns.
Lacy Tweeds
First presented last year with
lacy patterned tweeds, the fabric
was neither explored nor develop-
ed, but Spring, 1956 finds it great-
ly expanded both here and abroad
with the claim that it is "just
as pretty as it is smart."
News in lacy wools is the blend-
ing of silk or linen to enhance
the weave while the color wheel
swings to monotone or monotone-
look colors for them.
While the knit-look in coatings,
another cousin to the large tweed
family, does not top the fashion
scale it can scarcely be overlooked.
Paris-inspired, this texture has
achieved important success since
its relatively recent arrival , this
side of the Atlantic.
Tweed Mixtures
As with other weaves, American
designers are adding silk, linen,
or cotton fibers to this one to give
it a new and exciting look.
Colors for these mixtures are
most often featured in pale to
medium brights that allow any
ornamentation to show. Here

again beige has the first vote in
popularity with brights hovering
in the background.
Shetland tweeds, widely accept-
ed in England and on the conti-
nent, seem to be up and coming
here although they have not yet
infiltrated the American scene to
any great degree.

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WILD'S WILD'S WILD'S WILD'S

WILD'S

WILD'S WILD'S

WILD'S

NEW YORK TO FLORIDA:
Students Plan Ideal' Easter Vacations

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By SUE RAUNHEIM
"I'm certainly looking forward
to Spring Vacation."
This* statement can be heard
echoing over the University cam-
pus as students prepare for the
trips which, will take them for
from classes and books..
Susan Scovill is planning to go
on the Michigan Symphony Band
Tour which will travel through
the upper peninsula of Michigan.
Sixty-three students will take this
trip which is sponsored by the
School of Music.
Michigan Tour
Joan Holmberg, another music
student plans to travel with the
M i c h i g a n Singers throughout
Michigan. This group is composed
mostly of upperclassmen and grad-
uate students who perform classi-
cal music and University songs.
"It's 80 degrees in Dallas right
now," stated Marilyn Berry, slur-
ring her words as she spoke. "I
can't wait to be there." Miss
Berry is afraid that she is losing
her southern accent and that they
won't let her across the border.
The first thing she wants to do

when she gest home is picnic and
swim.
"My roommate is taking me
home with her," stated Myla
Greenberg. MissrGreenberg and
her roommate are going to At-
lantic City, N. J. where they will
see the Easter Parade on the
Boardwalk. From there they will
travel on to New York City for
a few days of sight-seeing and
theatre-going.
New York Bound
Also going to New York is Ruth
Oppenheium, a junior in literary
school. Miss Oppenheim mentioned
that she can't wait to go night-
clubbing and "hit the high spots"
after "being cooped up" in school
all semester.
Tom Jolls, a physics major has
made big plans for the holidays.
He is going home to Highland
Park, Ill., and plans to go to
Chicago for a few days. "The thing
I intend to do most is sleep"
stated Jolls smiling. Besides this
favorite pasttime, he plans to at-
tend museums and movies and to
have parties.

Peter Hams, chemical engineer,
is going to Minnesota on a moose
hunt, while Florida is the vaca-
tion spot for Bob Leland and Tom
Hotchkiss. They plan to go deep-
sea fishing, get some of that "good
old Florida sun" and loaf on the
beaches.
Sarah Eisenberg, a speech major,
plans to go to Washington, D. C.
While there she will visit the dif-
ferent x scenic spots and view a
meeting of Congress if it is in
session.
Then there are those students
who will not be returning home
but plan to sleep, eat and loaf for
the week. These students will be
on hand to greet returning smil-
ing faces from their brief vaca-
tion.

This season WILD'S is presenting
its finest and largest seleetion of handwoven
imported wool Shetland Sportcoats.
Featuring
7p
< ,
' Natural Shoulders r
t Three Button;' r
1 Confined Patterns
* Deep hooked Vents and
Flapped Pockets'
0 Soft Flex Construction ' <4
Plenty of Matching, Trousers
retailing from 12.95 to 25.00
se ;'a-a na «;.

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FOR YOUR
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