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March 10, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

KO-KO, NANKI.POO, PEEP-BO:
Operetta Pokes Fun at British Society
By DONNA HANSON 1OM

A Japanese sword fell and an
idea was formed into one of Gil-
bert and Sullivan's most well
known operettas, "The Mikado,"
which the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society is presenting next month.
After a near-failure with their
production, "Princess Ida," the duo
of Gilbert and Sullivan needed a
new idea for the op'eretta fast.
One evening, as Gilbert was sit-
ting in -his study, an ancient
Japanese sword fell from his wall
reminding him of a model Japan-
ese village that had recently been
erected at Knights bridge, not far
away. Thus, Gilbert's ideas emerg-
ed as the libretto of "The Mikado."
Hired Geisha Girl
In an attempt to portray the
characters in the operetta as au-
thentically as possible, the duo
hired a geisha girl to instruct the
people in the show the basic man-
nerisms of the Japanese people.
Although the plot contains
Japanese characters and setting,
true to Gilbert and Sullivan style,
the idea is aimed at British society
and government.
The story itself centers around
a love triangle between Yum-Yum,
a beautiful young maiden, Nanki-
Poo, a traveling minstrel, and Ko
Ko, the Lord High Executioner and
Yum-Yum's guardian.
Yum-Yum is betrothed to Ko-
Ko, but is not in love with him.
Nanki-Poo comes on the scene and
declares his love for the young
girl. The plot become hilariously
entangled when the Mikado, the
emperor, tells Ko-Ko that if some-
one isn't executed immediately,
the post of Lord High Executioner
will be abolished and the city of
Titipu reduced to the rank of a
village.
Happy Ending
As in the end of all Gilbert and
Sullivan operettas, the various
mix-ups are all settled and "every-
one lives happily ever after."
Though the operetta was accept-
ed enthusiastically everywhere it
Government
Scholarships:
Lfealet Topi
The importance of geographic
distribution in the selection and
placement of students under the
government sponsored exchange
programs is the subject of a pam-
phlet recently published by the
Institute of International Educa-
ti on.'
"Congress is anxious to see that
students from every state are rep-
resented in the Fulbright Exchange
Program," Ralph A. Sawyer, Dean
of the Horace H. Rackham School
of Graduate Studies said.
The Fulbright Exchange Pro-
gram, which uses foreign money
obtained by the sales abroad of
surplus war supplies, is used to
send abroad about 900 American
students each year, and to pay
the travel expenses of about 1600
foreign students to come to this
country.
29 From Michigan
"Twenty nine out of 138 who
applied for Fulbright grants in the
State of Michigan last year were
accepted," he said. This represents
an attempt by the national com-
mittee at geographical distribution.
Dean Sawyer, who is also, a
member of the Institute of In-
ternational Education's Advisory
Committee on Graduate Studies,
explained that two years ago the
Senate Appropriations Commit-
tee told the Board of Foreign
Scholarships which selects the
Fulbright students that better geo-
graphic distribution was needed.

As a result of this warning the,
system for selection was revised
to allow the colleges to nominate
two candidates to a state selection
committee which would recom-
mend two state candidates which
would have preference. In this
way each state was assured of be-
ing represented.
Less Populous States
Also more attention is given to
applicants from less populous
states, Sawyer said. A student
applicant from Nebraska or North
Dakota had about twice the prob-
ability of one from New York or
Massachusetts of getting a Ful-
bright scholarship.
"This sort of special treatment
of the less populous or less weal-
thy states is similar to that policy
in Federal Aid to schools and high-
ways," he said.
"We don't have any trouble get-
thing foreign students here," Saw-
yer noted. "The University had
last year about 810 foreign stu-
dents from outside North America,
about half of whom are in gradu-
ate school."
In contrast, Duke University has

Did Dulles
Goof? Coeds
Like Him
Forty nine per cent of the col-
legiate students questioned in a
national survey believed Secre-
tary Dulles "goofed" by making his
famous "brink of war" statement.
The students were asked the
following question by the Associat-
ed Collegiate Press:
"In a recent magazine article,
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles was reported to have said
that diplomacy is the ability to
walk to the "brink of war" and
keep-from going over.
"Do you think he 'goofed' in
making this statement?"
Beside the 49 per cent answer-
ing in the affirmative, 32 per
cent said he did not and 19 per
cent were undecided.
In stating that Dulles did err,
students made such comments as
"He really blew this one" and, "It
casts the American people in a
warlike manner."
A' graduate student at Syracuse
(N. Y.) University said, "The
statement was not the paragon of
diplomacy - the inconsiderate
blunder of making such a state-
ment public is inconceivable."
Students who defended Dulles'
explained "Mr. Dulles laid the
situation right on the line, and
perhaps set many nations to
thinking, including Russia."
"Dulles did not 'goof.' Dulles!
is a man who knows what he's
talking about."
In the poll, co-eds were some-
what more uncertain that Dulles'
did goof than the men.

What Isn't?
..VALPARAISO, Chile (A -
Mayor Santiago 4Diaz Buzeta
complains dying is too expen-
sive in Chile.
He is campaigning for a
nationwide ceiling on prices for
funeral services.
Trigon Wins
Pledge Prize
Trigon pledge class won the
Sigma Chi Foundation Pledge
Scholarship trophy at the annual
spring pledge convocation of the
Junior - Interfraternity Council
recently at the Union Ballroom
with a 2.9 average.
About 150 fraternity pledges at-
tended the meeting.
Briefly mentioning the MIT
prank incident, Assistant Dean of
Men Bill Zerman cautioned, the
pledges to think carefully before
they act. It's the isolated inci-
dents that receive the attention
in newspapers, he said. Such a
thing results in bad publicity for
the fraternity, the whole frater-
nity system and the University.
All the advantages of fraternity
life are quickly forgotten.
Echoing Zerman's statement,
Dick Little, '56, president of Phi
Delta Theta, emphasized the re-
sponsibilities of the pledge.
Both Bert Getz, '59E, JIFC pre-
sident and Tim Leedy, '57 BAd,
newly elected president of IFC,
discussed the benefits of Michi-
gan's fraternity system. Leedy
invited all those who were inter-
ested to attend a mass try-out
meeting for IFC, Thursday, March
15 in room 30 of the Union.

SATURDAY, MARCH 10,1956
Law Panel Discusses Pre-legal Study

Law schools have done a lot of
soul searching to discover what
subjects are best suited for pre-
legal education, according to As-
sistant Dean of the University's
Law School James H. Robertson.
Speaking at a panel discussion
sponsored by the Michigan Crib,
Robertson said educators had come
to the conclusion "there is no set
pattern" for pre-legal studies.
Desirable Qualities
Robertson pointed out that al-
though the law schools don't insist
on mathematics or Shakespeare,
there are certain qualities that are
desirable in an undergraduate.
He listed some of these as bread-
th, awareness in dicipline, an abili-
ity to express oneself clearly, and
the ability to analyze material.
Goldman Talk
Dr. Malcolm Goldman will ad-
dress the Undergraduate Mathme-
matics Club at 7:30 p.m. Monday,
in 3201 Angell Hall.
His topic is "A Random Survey
of Probabilities."

Prof. Marcus L. Plant noted that
he found students had difficulties
in four areas. He advised that stu-
dents be well equipped in the Eng-
lish language. "It seems strange
that those with A.B. degrees
shouldn't be able to express them-,
selves, but it is true."
He further encouraged a broad
knowledge of history, and the
ability to handle abstract ideas.
These, along with an ignorance of
business practices and accounting
are the representative weaknesses
of students, he said.
Prof. Joseph E. Kallenbach, the
pre-law program coordinator in
the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts pointed out the desir-
ability of having advanced law stu-
dents come back to the Liberal
Arts College.
"The standards we attempted to
apply were those covered above by
Prof. Plant when we set up the
joint program six years ago," he
said.
'One More Element'
"I would add one more element
to these standards, and that is a

case study course," Kallenbach, a
professor of constitutional law in
the literary college added.
Prof. Luke K. Cooperrider of the
law school, the final member of
the panel, hailed the integrated
Liberal Arts-Law program as a
sound concept.
He emphasized the importance
of the ability to think logically,
and he advised leaning toward the
"think" courses rather than "mem-
ory" courses.
Union Cigarettes
Stolen Tuesday
Several packs of cigarettes were
stolen from a showcase in the Un-
ion billiards room Tuesday morn-
ing.
An unknown thief apparently
hid out in the room after it closed
at 11 p.m. A cash register was
broken into also, but it contained
no money.
Union officials feel there is no
chance of catching the thief.

4

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YUM YUM ... SAYS THE
AS HE LOOKS OVER A FEW
was performed, the Japanese Am-
bEssador to England attempted to
have it banned on the ground that
it held up his country and emperor
to ridicule, but failed.
"The Mikado" will be presented
in Ann Arbor by the Gilbert and
Sullivan Society April 13 and 14
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Playing the principle roles are
Bob Cotton, '58E, as Mikado, Dave
Dow, '58M, as Nanki-Poo, Gershom
Morningstar, '56, as Pish-Tush,

-Daily--Chuck Kelsey
LORD HIGH EXECUTIONER
OF THE TOWN'S BEAUTIES.
Dave Newmnan, '58, as Ko-Ko, ,nd
Bill Taylor, '56, as Pooh-Bah.
Alice - Dutcher, '56SM, will be
Katisha, Joan Homberg, '57SM,
Yum-Yum, Sally Weston, '59SM,
Peep-Bo and Nancy Witham, '56-
Ed., will be Pitti-Sing.
Tickets for the production will
go on sale in the administration
building the week before spring
vacation at $1.50, $1.20 and 90c
for the Saturday afternoon mati-
nee.

Come

to Church

Sunday

i

three. parts
to our one wonderful
Bermuda short set

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00"A.M.,
12 noon.,
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M. ;

Three ensembling go-togethers for your carefree
life under the sun ... 1. Tailored
sleeveless cotton shirts; 2. Trim cotton Bermuda
shorts with stitched permanent creases;
3. Knee-hi Helenca nylon stretch socks. Have
your trio in red or black Indian plaid with a
solid shirt; beige, olive or khaki paisley
print with a solid shirt; or, navy, khaki, red,
i olive or black with a striped shirt. Sizes 10 to 16.
each ensemble,
8.95

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship "Living up to a
Trust," Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M. Two Discussion Groups, Problems of
Christian Beliefs; Paul's Faith .end World Re-
ligion.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program.
Rev. William Hutchinson, Minister of Youth,
will speak on Salvation.
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum. Rev. Eugene A. Ran-
som will speak on "The Meaning of the
Cross."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open
daily.

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: DEATH AND
LIFE.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M., Memorial Christian Church. United
Nations film: "World Without End."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45:Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "Human Suffering
According to Christ." (Holy Communion in
the 9:30 service).
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Open Forum on
questions concerning evil and human suffer-
ing.
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vespers, with sermon
by the pastor.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Andrew Missiras
9:30 Matins
10:00 Sunday School.
10:30 Divine Liturgy
Sermon in Greek and English.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon: "We Be-
lieve in the Life that is Eternal." Sermon by
Reverend Press.
7 P.M. Student Guild.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.-Midweek Lenten Serv-
ice.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
9:45-The Student Class will conclude its study
of the "Parables of Jesus."
11:00-Sermon: "Faith and Works." Rev.
. Loucks.
5:30-There will be a student supper with the
Young Friends group as guests. Professor
Kenneth Boulding will speak to the group on
"The Non-Conformist as a Christian Citizen."
8:00-The choir accompanied by the University
Little Symphony will give two Bach cantatas.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State is Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock-Sunday School.
11 o'clock-Reverend Harold J. DeVries, former
pastor.
6 o'clock-Student Guild.
7 o'clock Sermon: "Troubles and Triumphs."
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting.
We welcome you.

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ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrew's
Church. (Breakfast at the Canterbury House
following the 9 o'clock).
11 o'clock. Morning prayer and sermon.
7 P.M. Presentation of the play "No Exit" fol-
lowed by discussion of the play.
8 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue,
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday 11 A.M.
Mar. 11-Substance
Wednesday 8 P.M.
Sunday School 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main. Tuesday to Sat-
urday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M., Monday 11 A.M. to
9 P.M., Sunday 2:30 to 4:30.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Mr. Donald Pelz
on: "Ann Arbor's Self Survey."
11 A.M. Services: Rev. Edward H. Redman
preaching: "Revelation or Science."
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Jim Clark
on: "Extra-Sensory Perception." Business
Meeting and Special Election.
Wednesday, March 14th - 7:30 P.M.-Paul
Blanshard at Natural Science Auditorium on
"Censorship." Tickets at $.50.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday: Worship Services at 8:15 A.M. (breakfast
following), 9:15 and 11:00 A.M, Seminar:
"The Problems of Faith" at 9:15 A.M. Cabi-
net meeting, 4:00 P.M. Supper (50c) at 5:30
P M "Whv Bthpr,.vrti;n ,the nthn

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 A.M.
Public Worship at the same hour. Dr. Parr will
give the fourth sermon in "Faiths Men Live
By." The subject is "ONE ADEQUATE SUP-
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