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March 10, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATi7RDAY, MARCH 10,

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

VA1" V Wag -

SATIYRDAY, MARCH 10, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY WA 11W Wi'Wm

r.a umarives

5

Largest

Crowd

in

History

Overflows

Ice

Arena

--Daily--JohnlrtWe

THE LARGEST CROWD EVER TO WITNESS A HOCKY GAME IN MICHIGAN HISTORY JAMS THE COLISEUM FOR LAST NIGHT'S BATTLE AGAINST MICHIGAN TECH.

Fans Brave Weather For Tech Ducats

Chants Greet Ice Squad
As Fans Express Spirit

Major Leagues Open Spring Circuit

By DAVE GREY
And even H. O. "Fritz" Crisler
' sold tickets.
Never in the history of any
Michigan athletic event here has
there been such a rush for tickets.
Quickest Sellout
Yesterday morning's stampede
for Michigan-Michigan Tech hoc-
key tickets has been called by offi-
rials at the Athletic Administration
Building as the quickest sellout in
history for any sporting event on
thik campus.
The line, which started at 2 p.m.
Thursday afternoon, also has been
estimated as the longest on record.
The demand early yesterday
morning was so great that even
Athletic Director Crisler aided the
manpower shortage by selling the
much-sought-after tickets.
Doors at the Athletic Adminis-
tratioh Building opened at about
8:20. /The last ticket for either
game this weekend was sold about
10:15.'
Limit Number
Some of the early fans who had
braved the cold to keep their place
in line overnight had orders for

tickets numbering in the hundreds.
Officials found it necessary in all
fairness to the others in line to
limit the number per pgson to
20.
- As it was, many of Michigan's
most loyal fans all season long
were unable to get tickets for this
weekend's WIHL championship
series with Tech.
Last night's crowd and tonight's.
will be remembered in Michigan
sports annuals as the largest in
Coliseum history. Every possible
seat in the normally 3,500-capacity
ice arena was filled last night.
Evey Available Inch
It is estimated that about 200
extra fans were squeezed into the
Coliseum. Every available inch of
space was used, while spectators
were urged not to save seats for
friends.
Other estimates from the Ath-
letic Administration Building said
that a possible 20,000 tickets could
have been sold for each game of
the series.
If Michigan keeps up its fantas-
tic hockey success-nine trips to

. 7----

the NCAA playoffs in nine years-
some solution would almost seem
necessary.%
As one student commented yes-
terday, "Maybe University officials
could arrange for the games to be
played outdoors-flood the football
Stadium, add lights for games at
night, and sideboards to mark the
ice dimensions."
Bets Placed
On Land y's Nose
MELBOURNE YP)--Thousands
of Australian bettors have made
John Landy a 2-1 favorite to
win the Australian Champion-
ship Mile today in under four
minutes.
So many have supported him
in unofficial betting on the race
that many bookmakers will only
bet on his chances of bettering
the 3:58 world record he now
holds.
"I have been training so well
I could not possibly turn in a
slow time," Landy said.

By The Associated Press

By BOB McELWAIN
Spirit reigned supreme at the
Hill Street Coliseum last night.
The largest crowd ever to view
a hockey game at Michigan gave
Michigan Tech an indication of
what was to follow when spon-
taneous "Let's Go Blue" chants
greeted.the Wolverines' every move
at the outset.
Each Michigan rush brought a
cheer from the enthusiastic crowd,
which was jammed into every.
available spot of the undersized
Coliseum.
The usual post-game color and
horse-play was strangely absent
in the Michigan dressing room,
but a quick glance at the tired
players' faces clearly revealed they
have but one thought in mind-
to win the "big one" tomorrow
night.
The staunch band of loyal Husk-
ie followers at the game made
their presence known when Tech

scored its lone goal early in the
game, but little was heard from
them after this brief uprising.
Despite this show of enthus-
iasm, unprecedented in Michigan
hockey history, Coach Vic Hey-
liger's only comment was, "Why,
this was mild compared to last
weekend. They REALLY go wild
there!"
Michigan hockey fans still have
one game left, tonight's wind-up
of regular season play, to top the
almost-legendary spirit generated
by Dee Stadium crowds. The big
question seems to be-Can it be
done?
SPORTS
Night Editor
JAVE RORABACHER

All 16 major league baseball
clubs will pair off Saturday in the
opening games of the Grapefruit-
Cactus League exhibition scram-
ble.
A dozen teams, headed by the
American League champion New
York Yankees, will start the ball
rolling at Florida training sites,
while four others swing into action
in Arizona. t
Most managers will start rookie
pitchers, holding back more ex-
perienced hurlers for later appear-
ances. There also will be a liberal
sprinkling of newcomers at the in-
field and outfield positions as the
the master minds begin finding
out who will stick around, and
determine the players slated to go
back to the minors for further
seasoning.
New Managers Appear
In the National League, three
new managers will lead their clubs
into battle, but all of the American
League pilots are back for another
season.
Bill Rigney moved up from Min-
neapolis to replace Leo Durocher,

manager of the New York Giants
since the 1948 season, while Bobby
Bragan is at the Pittsburgh Pi-
Sten gel Predicts
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. .P)--
Casey Stengel said yesterday he
figured the Cleveland Indians
and Boston Red Sox are the
teams likely to give his New
York Yankees the most trouble
in the 1956 American League
pennant race.
Detroit and- Chicago will be
contenders, but not as strong as
the Indians and Red Sox, the
Yankee manager added.
"The Red Sox did the most
toward winning a pennant dur-
ing the winter," he said, refer-
ring to the acquisition of pitcher
Bob Porterfield and first base-
man Mickey Vernon from
Washington.
"I have to respect Cleveland
because their pitching is so
good. They -kept my men from
hitting the ball last year and
beat me on the season."

rates' helm and Freddie Hutchin-
son has charge of the St. Louis
Cardinals.
Bragan, from Hollywood of the
Coast League, takes over the Pi-
rates, who finished last under Fred
Haney. Hutchinson, former Detroit
manager, relieves Harry Walker,
who replaced Eddie Stanky at St.
Louis during the 1955 season.
Schedule
Here are the exhibition openers:
Arizona-At Scottsdale: Chicago
(N) vs Baltimore (A); at Tucson:
New York (N) vs Cleveland (A).
Florida-At Miami (night): Bos-
ton (A) vs Brooklyn (N); at Tam-
pa: Cincinnati (N) vs Chicago
(A) ;at Lakeland: Washington (A)
vs Detroit- (A); at St. Petersburg:
St. Louis (N) vs New York j(A); at
West Palm Beach: Pittsburgh (N)
vs Kansas City (A); at Clearwater:
Milwaukee (N) vs Philadelphia
(N).
The clubs will play from 20 to
30 training games, some with mi-
nor league outfits, before moving
north for the opening of the reg-
ular season campaign April 17.

i

Pro Pistons, Warriors
Win NBA Division Titles
By JOHN LaSAGE of a spot in the Eastern Division
With less than a week of play playoffs, but the third position is
remaining in the National Basket- still up for grabs between the
ball Association, the Fort Wayne Syracuse Nationals, defending
Pistons and Philadelphia Warriors champions, and the New York
have wrapped up the titles in their Knickerbockers.
respective divisions. The Celtic cause has been led by
Other than the Pistons, the speedy Bob Cousy who, as he in-
Western Division looms as a dog- evitably does, has wrapped up the
fight right down to the wire. Of assists title with 577. This wipes
the four teams, only the one finish- out the record he had established
ing in the division basement will be last year and every assist he picks
eliminated from the playoffs. .up in the final six games will raise
Less than a game separates Min- the new standard. r
neapolis, St. Louis, and Rochester. Neil Johnston, who has already
The Lakers, led by big Clyde Lovel- lost his scoring title, may save face
lette, are in a virtual tie with St. by picking up a new one. Johnston
Louis for the second and third should win the field goal percent-
slots. Rochester trails these two age title with his current .460, but
by a game in the loss column. Fort Wayne's Larry Foust, sporting
Hawks Surge Upward a .446 percentage, still has a
Evidently the transition from chance fo rthe honors. Foust was
Milwaukee to St. Louis has been a last year's leader.
shot in the arm for the Hawks. Percentage Race Close
Bob Pettit has led their inspired Tightest race for an individual
drive for a playoff spot with his title is in the free throw per-
league leading point total of 1,603. centage department. The first
Couple this with his 25 point aver- three marksmen are all within five
age and you have new life for the percentage points of each other.
once-sagging Hawks. Johnston, Foust, and Boston's Bill
Pettit has also taken rebound Sharman have all been sure death
laurels according to latest statis- from the 15 foot stripe this season.
tics, but his scoring lead is none Johnston's .456 leads the way.
too secure. Paul Arizin of Phila- A new record in league scoring
delphia looms as a real threat at average has also been established,
this point, and the coming week's with each squad firing an average
activity should decide this much 98.6 points per outing. Boston's
sought after crown. fantastic 105.4 point per game clip
The Boston Celtics are assured leads the rest.

i

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