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March 10, 1956 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MARC!! 10, 1956

ncomplete,' "Unfair' Blasts
irected Against SGC Report

FIFTY YEARS' PROGRESS:
City Offers Year-round Facilities

M

EIl~r

(Continued from Page 1)
uss this report with an open mind.
ot one member of the panel has
ne-on either side."
Many ex-officio and elected
GC members were at the meet
g along with several sorority
lumnae officials.
Idea 'Unfair'
Alumnae advisor Mrs. William
Talz said, "The idea that this
roup must accept a plan without
ny effort on the part of the study
roup toward coming to you to
licit your opinions is unfair."
Former SGC vice-president Don-
a Netzer, herself an affiliate, 56,
autioned, "The questions being
sked today are questions which
iould have been asked all fall
uring the study."
One sorority girl replied, "It's
ard to question something you
dn't know was going on."
'Delegates Were Informed'
Miss Townsend reminded the
oup, "All delegates were inform-
I and requested at the beginning
the study to direct any ques-
ons or facts they had to the
anhellenic representatives."
The dispute ended as one mem-
er commented, "It is difficult to
Lise guestions until you have the
acts and that is just what we are
oing now on the basis of this
port."
Basing her comments on "past
xperience with both fall and
pring rushing," Mrs. Walz said
hat spring rushing "puts sorori-
es at a disadvalitage.
Quotas Hard to Fill
"Facts indicate," she claimed,
that quotas are hard to fill in
ie spring and that propaganda-
alk in the dorms by people who

don't know the system-prejudices
too many people against sorori-
ties. A return to spring rushing
will eventually mean that some
sororities will be forced off cam-
pus."
Answering a call from Council
President Hank Berliner, 56, for
more "analagous facts why spring
rushing was dropped five years
ago," Mrs. Walz said, "What situa-
tion is perfectly analagous to one
many years earlier? You can't say
the situation is the same."
Explanation Given
Berliner reminded the assembled
members that "the burden of proof
rests upon those who are not in
favor of this report to propose
cogent reasons why they are not,
in view of the fact that this de-
cision was a majority-minority one
and not a two-two decision.
"If the report had been the re-
sult of an even split, then it would
be up to those opposing the status
quo to present their case."
Miss Townsend, expressing de-
sire for any written comments of
the group, adjourned the meeting
until 4 p.m. Tuesday.
Coming Elections
Ann Arbor's annual elections will
be held on April 2, with the voters
having a choice of four cendidates
for two positions of alderman-at-
large.
In the race are incumbents Rus-
sell Burns and Wendell Forsyth,
Republicans, and Albert Logan
and Dean Coston, Democrats.
Also to be considered by the
electorate are two city charter
amendments, and three annexa-
tions of property into the city.

By ALLAN STILLWAGON
Do you remember what it's like
to be on the top of a Jungle Gym?
No airplane could climb as high
when you're small and just a little
bit scared. The other kids looked
like midgets and you were proud
because you got up with' ro help
from anybody.
It's a great feeling, rivaled only
by swings, slides and teeter-totters.
The amount of planning and or-
ganization behind each Jungle
Gym in the city is great, however,
and the Department of Parks has
little time to take advantage of
the facilities they maintain.
Now finishing its 50th year of
service, the Ann Arbor Park Board
has amassed an impressive list of
accomplishments.
Began in 1905
The city began in 1905 with a
used building supply storage year,
and now controls 1130 acres of
park land. Before that time, a
long hard work week and an abun-
dance of wide open spaces made
city recreation unheard of. Today,
an airport, a golf course, 17 parks
and six playflelds command the
attention of the park commission-
ers and the Superintendant of
Parks, E. A. Gallup.
Winter and summer, there is
always something happening at
one of the Ann Arbor parks or
playgrounds.I
In the summer, stoves and pic-
nic tables are captured by those
not attracted by softball diamonds,
tennis courts, shuffle board courts
or an archery range. For those
who like to provide their own en-
tertainment, more than 100 acres,
including the Glen and Arboretum,
are classified as "wooded area."
For the young fry, six merry-
go-rounds, 10 sandboxes and two
wading pools promise excitement.
A Mount Everest climber and a
Miracle Whirl are offered to the
especially brave.
Golf Tournaments
Last summer 9600 players par-
ticipated in the city-sponsored
baseball tournaments, 400 in golf
tournaments. A supervised sum-
mer recreation program delights
the foot-loose younger set at 11
local elementary schools over the
city. Last summer 64,000 of their
ranks swooped down upon Ann
Arbor's team of trained personnel.
With the snows come a number
of indoor attractions. Both men's
a n d women's choruses thrive
alongside the Ann Arbor Civic
Orchestra from September to
June.
Adult recreation classes in fall
and winter attract more than
5000.
Four parks in Ann Arbor offer
ice skating facilities with heated
shelters. Burns Park, West Park,
Allmendinger Park and Northside
served more than 38,000 fans last
winter.
4 A senior citizens group meets on
Tuesday evenings throughout the
entire year.
This past year was devoted to
the improvement of Ann Arbor
parks rather than the purchase of

-Courtesy of University News Service
JUNGLE GYM AND GYMNASTS
... the fresh green welcome mat is always out.

M.AY FESTIVAL

SINGLE CONCERT TICKETS

new ones. Extensive cleanup and
development of land was carried
on at the Veteran's Memorial, and
substantial progress was made in
planning the memorial coliseum to
be located there.
Receipts From Patrons
The second nine at the Huron
Municipal Golf Course was com-
pleted, with all expenses of the
work being defrayed by receipts.
from patrons.
The most typical of the muni-
cipal recreation areas familiar to
University students is Island Park.
Bordering the scenic Huron river
east of Wall street, the area " in-
cludes several offshore island; re-
treats.
No less than five soft and hard
ball diamonds are maintained
along with swings, a merry-go-
round, and a Miracle Whirl for the
uninhibited.
Those hunting an appropriate
locale for picnics find Island Park
a joy. Thirty-five soft grassy acres
abound with tables, benches and
camp stoves. In case of rain, two

OVER THE COUNTER
$1.50 -$2.00 - $2.50 --$3.00- $3.50
BEGINS MARCH 12
at BURTON TOWER
A limited number of season tickets still available

The Ann Arbor Park system is
a source of well-earned elation
for the city.
With very modest appropria-
tions, land for parks and play-'
grounds has been developed in all
parts of the city, much more than
the minimum standard set by the
National Recreation Association.
Neighboring communities eye
the local accomplishments envi-
ously and officials continually
"point with pride." Even more sig-
nificant is the appreciation ex-
pressed by thousands of citizens
through their year-after-year re-
turn.
In Ann Arbor, the fresh green
welcome mats are always out for
young and old.
Report Given.
On Resperine
Resperine, a tranquilizing drug,
may prove helpful in the treatment
of children who are emotionally
unstable and easily upset.
According to Dr. Ernest H. Wat-
son, medical director of the pedia-
tric out-patient department at
University Hospital, reports on the
use of resperine on children living
in supervised residences have been
"very favorable."
Presenting a report to the mem-
bers of the Michigan Clinical In-
stitute in Detroit, Dr. Watson not-
ed the effects of resperine cannot
be fully realized until the drug
has been administered for several
weeks.
Dr. Watson said similar sedation
in children might be achieved more
rapidly by the use of another new
drug, chlorpromazine.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE
TROPICAIy FISH, plants, aquarium sup-
plies, hamsters, one baby"alligator.
Univ. Aquarium. NO 3-0224. )146
ARMY, NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)123B
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Hockey fans to ride to Den-
ver. Leave Tues. night, March 13 or
Wednesday morning, March 14. Share
driving expenses. Arrange for your
own return. Call NO 2-6654 or leave
message, NO 3-4145. )42G
AVIS rent-a-car or truck for local or
long distance use. Reasonable daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales, Inc., 210 W. Washington St.
NO 3-4156. )15S
RIDERS to California in June via Yel-
lowstone, Grand Canyon, Las Vegas.
NO 2-8444. )40G
FOR RENT
SUITE FOR TWO OLDER BOYS-Board-
ing, convenient to campus. 1328 Ged-
des. )C48
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Woman's gold Bulova between
Engine Arch and Stockwell. Fish, 1539
Stockwell. ) 143A
LOST-Purse cosmetic bag containing
sterling silver lipstick case. Phone
NO 3-1511, ext., 2147. )142A
LOST SATURDAY between 1520 S. Uni-
versity and Stockwell, glasses. Phone
2060 Stockwell. )136A
LOST-Green Snorkle pen, Albert P.
Levin engraved lightly. Call 39 Hayden
House, E.Q. )137A
BUSINESS SERVICES
FRENCH TUTORING. Editorial Work
on Short Manuscripts. Call NO 3-
2382. )39J
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus C-3 Camera with case and flash-
used. $39.95.
Purchase Camera Shop
1116 S. University Phone: NO 8-6972
)141B
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main 207 E. Washington
NO 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:
Armstrong linoleum and tile
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."
)36J
SPEECH IMPROVEMENT - practical
training for professional, business,
social purposes. NO 3-1531, Ext. 296.
)35J
RICHARI MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J

USED CARS
1941 FORD Club coupe, good tires, no
rust, runs perfectly, $95.
1952 CHEVROLET 2-door, grey, real
clean and low mileage, $445.
1953 WILLYS hardtop, 2-tone paint, ra-
dio, heater, overdrive, 20,000 miles,
white-wall tires and like new, $745.
1950 PLYMOUTH Stationwagon, radio,
heater, in excellent condition, $445.
Jim White Chevrolet, Inc.
Ashley at Liberty, First at Washington
Phone NO 2-5000 or NO 3-6495
)130N
'47 PLYMOUTH 4 door special deluxe,
new tires, rebuilt motor, new brakes
.and battery. Runs like new. Cali NO
2-6629, evenings. )129N
1948 PLYMOUTH Sedan-good engine,
good tires, good interior, new license.
Needs some body work. $125. Phone
NO 3-6649. )127N
TRANSPORTATION - $50, '47 Chevie
coupe, call NO 3-2090 after 6. )128N
CHEVROLET, 1949 - Four-door. Good
radio and heater, $225. Phone NO 3-
3990 after 6 P.M. )126N
WE NEED USED CARS!
to stock our new lot. We can give you
top allowance on your present car ..
any make or model! Come in and test
drive the new, beautiful 1956 Mercury.
Our low overhead enables us to give
you the top notch deal on a new or
used car in Washtenaw county. Fitz-
gerald, Inc. lincoln-Mercury, 3345
Washtenaw Rd. Phone NO 3-4197 -
NO 2-3293. )116N

C lassifieds

HELP WANTED
GIRL to take care of one child, morn-
ings. Call NO 3-1123. %)87H
WANTED-Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Excellent salary. Morning de-
livery, no collecting. Call NO 2-3241.
)84H
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part time.
Apply 113 S. Ashley. Ann Arbor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70H
BOARDERS
BOARDERS WANTED. $10 per week.
Good food. Call NO 8-8400. )138
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 Male Students.
Cooking privileges. Half block from
campus. 417 E. Liberty. )33D

CLOSED TUESDAY

Telephone NO 2-9575

Cinemaquild4
TODAY at 7 and 9
Sunday at 8 only
PASSPORT TO
PIMLICO
with STANLEY HOLLOWAY
and MARGARET RUTHERFORD
Architecture Auditorium ,
50c

Read
Daily

ENJOY
CarryIZZA Beer is Wine
Service Served
at the
Del Rio Restaurant
122 West Washington at Ashley
Open 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.

LATE SHOW
ONIGHT 11 P.M.'

picnic shelters spread their
in protection.

roofs

jaElDIAL NO 2-3136)

A feast of, laughter and wild,
amazing adventure in the king-sized
comedy of this or any year!
.the Funniest Kaye on Movie Record !"
-LIFE MAGAZINE
' .: rrS:

PFete Seeger
To Perform
He sings folk songs and
lads.

bal-

He accompanies himself on a!
five-stringed banjo.

Cnlor byT CHNICOtAR
VISTA ISIOH

"EXCELLENT... recommended
to all!" -N.Y. Post

Doors open at 12:45
Shows at 1, 3,,5, 7, 9 P.M.

Next Attraction
"PICNIC"

TODAYDTHRU
SUNDAY

ORPHEUM 1:30 P.M.

A DIFFERENT KIND OF LOVE STORY! FRAUGHT WITH SUSPENSE!
"ENGROSSING ALL THE WAY"-N.Y. TIMES

MICHAEL LEO
EDGRAVE GENN

f ii

gyp
7 '
4
,!J y
Qf
',
}
.."'jj, t
It.
,7
'4
r .

Union Plans7
To 'Boy Frien
"The Boy Friend" wil
destination of the Unio
theater trip of the semi
March 20.
The musical comedy s
the twenties is now pl
Detroit, following a two-,
on Broadway.
A combined bus and
ticket, a $5.50 value, wi
sale for $3 in the Union
offices beginning Tuesday
AA Playreadi
Ann Arbor Playreading
meeting at 8 p.m. Sunda
asonic Temple, will rea
Brutus," by James Barrie.
Bernice Auslander wi
the group.
Anyone may attend
charge. There is a nominE
'for membership.
TI
PAUL B
RED JOHNSON
Ti

Hes an editor, lecturer, night
rip club, concert and motion picture
p star.
d' Pete Seeger, internationally not-
ed songster, will appear here to-
l be the night in a concert of folk songs
,n's first and popular ballads.
tester on His Natural Sience Auditorium
concert, scheduled for 8:30 p.m., is
atire on sponsored by the Inter-Arts Un-
ion. Proceeds will be used for an
ayingr n Inter-Arts Symposium; to be held
yearrunin May.
theater World War II and the Army oc-
11 go on cupied four years time. It increas-
i student ed his observation of singing and
yplaying techniques and gave him
an insight as to what folk music,
actually was.
ng He then hit the road, perform-
ing in major American cities, sing-
g Group, ing and playing on the major net-
y in the works, filming, recording, writing
id "Dear and editing.
Seeger's c o n c e r t, originally
11 direct scheduled for Slauson School
Auditorium, was cancelled last
free of month when weather prevented
al charge the landing of his plane at Willow
Run.
ON IGHT!
IUNYAN BALL
* UNION * INFORMAL
kets $2.00 (at desk)

ANNTOD
JO~dLEI

WUERTH
TODAY THRU SUNDAY

Organization
Notices

American Institute of Architects:
Meeting, March 12, 4:00 p.m., Rm. 246.
Arch. Bldg.
Hillel Foundation.: Faculty Open
House, March 11, 4:00 p.m., Hillel. Dr.
Isadore A. Bernstein will be guest.
Saturday morning Sabbath services,
9:00 a.m., Hillel.t
Student Zionist Organization will
sponsor a discussion on the topic, "The
Middle East Crisis-What We Can Do,"
7:00 p.m., March 11, Hillel.
Sunday night Supper Club: March 11,
6:00 p.m., Hillel.
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Rev.
Robert Murray of St. James Episcopal
Church, Dexter, Michigan, will speak on
"Every Tongue Shall Confess," Mar.
11, 4:00 p.m., Lane Hall.
* *' *
Russky Kruzhok: Conversation in
Russian, March 12, 8:00 p.m., Interna-
tional Center. Refreshments will be
served.
* 4 *
Student Religious Association: -Folk
Dancing at Lane Hall, March 12, 7:30-
10:00 p.m., Recreation Room. Instruc-
tion for every dance and beginners are
welcome.
Unitarian Student Group: James
Clark will speak on "Extra Sensory
Perception," March 11, 7:00 p.m., Uni-
tarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw. Trans-
portation pick-up at Lane Hall and
StockwellDorm. at 6:45 p.m.

NThunder~n
.air adventure!a
M-G-M presents ~
SPENCER IRENE
15&TBACY v DUNNE AR
in VICTOR FLEMINGS'
Production of cIEN
--
..VAN JHSNETE IIILIAMS'
AN MG-M MASTERPIECLEPRINT . :
ALSO
VICE AND VIOLENCE
EXPOSE!
EDWARD SMALae
N EW YORK
C9NFIDENTIAL
CRAWYFORD ┬░CONJE -M~AXWELLANCROFHNAISI!
OR BNLCRCUN "PLAY Y
SR6ct YCLARENCE GREENE. AEAOO*Iic~ct .. jsAEEAEOAUSCi aJIO~S
olRCT!O aYRUSSELL ROUSE - eus a, WARNER BROS,

Dow

scren...HAKRRY S
i n h e,
, udience !
o I
Ir

Id

Now

H ITC14COCK4S

u mmomm

MICHIGAN

:'-I

FRIDAY FOR 1 WEEK
"SHEEP HAS 5 LEGS" Fernandel (the one and only)-

i

o ,
,,
;
C
ra agseuM .e

ry

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
Christopher fry
A SLEEP
OF

I

i

I

ftillm" .1 RAMP Wooft

PARAMOUNT PRESENTS
A.FREJ)
IE-ITIIX)K'
TH E
ITH CKo
rV a eF~

Oh, Frank . . . yOu know
the way to a woman's
heart! I'd never suspect-
ed that I'd be wooed

MIM 1I -

,.:

I

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