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February 29, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-29

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1956

TIME MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE Me

' AnnualA-Ball
Will Feature
Venice' Mood
Entertainment Plans
Will Include Gondola,
Street Scene, Bands
Assembly Association coeds take
advantage of leap year privileges
as they sponsor "A Night in Ven-
ice" from 8:30 p.m. to midnight
Saturday at the League.
The annual Assembly Ball first
coed-bid dance of 1956 offers
women an opportunity to repay
J-Hop invitations.
Decorations chairr. an Sarah
Kolin has designed the large gon-
dola which will highlight the deco-
rations in the Ballroom. Murals
depicting a Venetian street scene
will cover the walls.
Cafe Venice
The second floor lounge will be
transformed into the "Cafe Ven-
ice" for the evening's festivities.
Hal Singer's Band will play for
couples in the Ballroom, while Paul
Brodie's Orchestra provides a more
informal type of dance music in
the Hussey Rm.
Intermission entertainment will
feature Fred Dart, baritone horn
soloist; Joy Meyers, vocalist and
Hugh Glucker, vibraphone solo-
ist. Brodie will also present several
novelty numbers. Refreshments
will be served.
Program Souvenirs
Each coed attending the dance
will receive a blue and white pro-
gram with a gondola on the cover
as a souvenir of her "Night in
Venice:',
Cocktail dresses or formals will
be the appropriate attire for wom-
en attending the affair. The dance'
committee has requested that
there be no corsages.
Assembly has extended an invi-
tation to all affiliated women on
campus to attend A-Ball. During,
the war years, the dance was'spon-
sored jointly by Assembly and
Panhellenic.
Boutonnieres Available
Women can secure boutonnieres
for their dates by filling out the
stub of the ticket and returning it
to the representative from whom
they purchased it.
As in previous years, several of
the women's dormitories are hold-
ing "coketall" parties before the
dance..
Tickets may be obtained on the
r Diagonal, at the Administration
Building or from dormitory activi-
ties chairmen.,
Sandy Marx, general chairman;t
Mickey Gendell, publicity; Barb-
ara Maier, finance and orchestra;r
Betsy Alexander, tickets and Jean
Irving, patrons and programs arec
in charge of producing this year's
dance. -

tf4 v ra International Center
:S S,)^ ^. C v4:d oa p',:oA\ ,
To Offer Spring Tour ;,x , t.l.)t" : .:<. ;£..,." "~ ' .,:%

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"OVER THE BOUNDING MAIN"-Members of the Sailing Club
practice for a regatta at Baseline Lake. The club will hold a mass
meeting for all students both graduate and undergraduate, who
are interested in salling, at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in Rms. J, K, L
and M of the Union.
U' Club Teaches Members
Sailing Techniques, Methods

New York City, Washington, D.C.
and Niagara Falls will be visited
during an International Center
sponsored tour, to be offered at
"greatly reduced rates" during
Spring vacation.
Open to all interested persons,
the tour will cover major points
of interest in each of the desig-
nated cities.
The fee will include round-trip
transportation, housing for seven
days, a visit to Mt. Vernon, Bed-
loe's Island and the Statue of Lib-
erty.
Daily Schedule
For any members of the group
who wish to participate, there will
be a planned schedule for each
day. However, students will be at
liberty to use their time in what-
ever manner they wish.
Leaving Friday afternoon by
train foir Washington, D. 'C., per-
sons participating will stay at
Gaunt House. In Washington they
will visit the Smithsonian Insti-
tute, Washington and Jefferson
Monuments, the Treasury Building
and the White House.
Sunday's itinerary will "include
Easter Service at a church just
a few doors away from the one
that President Eisenhower attends
for all those who wish to go, a boat
ride around the Potomac, a visit
to the National Art Gallery and
finally a Marine Band Concert.
Tour of Mount Vernon
A tour of Mount Vernon will
occupy most of the next day which
will culminate by a visit to the
foreign embassies.
Tuesday morning will be spent
observing Congress in session and
in the afternoon the group will
leave for New York. City where
they will spend four days.
Included as points of interest
there will be the United Nations
Building, the Metropolitan Mu-
seum, Radio City, the Empire State
Building, the Statue of Liberty, the

By PAT NORTQN

"Rigging," "knots," "skipper"
and "crew" are all important
words to members of an active,
yet little known campus organiza-
tion, the Sailing Club.
This club, open to all students,
has as its aim teaching beginners
how to sail.
With this in mind the Sailing
Club is holding a mass meeting
at 7:36 p.m. tomorrow in Rm.'s
J, K, L and M of the Union.
Speeches will be given, questions
answered and pictures of the club's
activities shown.
Everyone Invited
Anyone with the slightest inter-'
est is invited to attend and re-
freshments will be served.
Since its beginning in 1938 the
club has rapidly increased its
equipment from four eleven and
a half foot dinghies, which were
partially paid for with dues and
contribution from its members, to
its current eleven dinghies, a
crash-boat, an iceboat and a dock
on Baseline Lake..
At present the group is in the
process of building a club house
at the lake.
Organized by Students
The Sailing Club started out
when the department of Naval
Architecture at the University at-
tracted many enthusiastic sailing
fans. These would-be sailors saw
no reason for not being able to
sail during the school months, and
organized the club.
Today the organization is a char-
ter member of the Midwest Collegi-
leaning,
REE MINOR REPAIRS:
* Trouser cuffs brushedz
and tacked
* Seam-rips repaired
" Buttons replaced
D RENTAL SERVICE
bund & studs ... $9.50
e always wanted it done"
Cleaners I
NO 8-6335

ate Sailing Association, and is thus
allowed to take part in many of
the intercollegiate regattas during
the year.
This past fall the Sailing Club
placed first, second or third in the
six regattas which they entered.
They now rank second in the mid-
west.
Attend Shore School
Although they travel as much
as 1000 miles to attend the weel-
end regattas the club holds shore
school once a week at which time
its members learn the rudiments
of sailing.
Beginners, who must know how
to swim or be taught, learn .how
to tie knots, the nomenclature of
boating and rigging of boats.
They are also taught, by the
more experenced members of the
club, the proper way to handle
themselves from the time they
start to sailuntil the time they
have put away the boats after the
races.
Useful Experience
What is learned in shore school
is put into practical use at the
lake. When members feel they are
capable they may take tests for
crew and skipper.
For those students who know
how to sail, experienced racing
skippers teach them the tactics
and rules of racing so that they
may participate-in regattas.
Sailing generally begins in March
as soon as the ice breaks and ex-
tends to the following November.
During the winter months mem-
bers spend afternoons and week-
ends doing maintenance work on
the boats.
Bridge Tournaments
Students interested in at-
tending Friday night bridge
tournaments may attend the
first meeting at 7:45 p.m. Fri-
day in Rm. 3-G of the Union.
There will be a small en-
trance fee and a money prize
will be awarded the winning
team. Mrs. Walter McLean will
supervise the games.

Museum of Modern Art and Bed-
loe's Island.
International House
While visiting New York stu-
dents will live at International
House.
Leaving New York City on Sat-
urday evening, the group will ar-
rive at Niagara Falls where they
will spend all of Sunday.
Marquerite Randall, Secretary to
International Student Groups, who
will accompany the students
stressed that the tour is open to
both American and foreign stu-
dents.
American Participation Urged
She mentioned that most of the
foreign' students who have already
signed up expressed wishes that
more Americans might go.
"There will be a mutual benefit
if both American and foreign stu-
dents are able to participate," she
said.
"The foreign students will be
able to get an American interpre-
tation of the places visited, while
the American students will have
the opportunity to introduce their
culture to the visitors."
In addition, Mrs. Randall re-
marked that Americans will be
able to receive fresh 'impressions
of their cultural monuments.
Persons interested in participat-
ing in the tour may call Mrs.
Randall at the ISA office in the
Union.
Hillel To Present
Talk on Talmud
"The Talmud, a Primary Source
of Jewish Tradition" will be the
subject of a talk to be given by
Bernard Isaacs of Detroit at 8 p.m.
today at the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation.
Isaacs, an author, scholar and
educator, has for many years been
the superintendent of the United
Hebrew Schools of Detroit. He has
written many volumes of stories
and essays in Hebrew and has
published articles in American
educational journals.
In addition to being one of the
founders of the National Council
for Jewish Education he has given
leadership in other educational
endeavors.
Isaacs' lecture, which is open to
the public, will include a discussion
of the nature and origin of the
Talmud, its relations to the Bible
and its influence on Jewish his-
tory.
A period will follow the lecture
during which the audience may
present questions to Isaacs for
special discussion.

IMPORTANT ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS FOR POSITIONS AT

NORTH

AME RICAN'S

COLUMBUS DIVISION
North. American Aviation, foremost in the design and production of
military aircraft, has an established engineering team at its Columbus
Division with prime responsibility for complete design and development
of Navy aircraft.
The New FJ-4-Navy's latest and fastest FuY JET-is the most
recent achievement at Columbus. Other, even more advanced designs
are now being developed from initial concept to actual flight...creating
top opportunities for virtually all types of graduate engineers.
Contact your Placement Office for an appointment with North
American representatives. MARCH 1 AND 2.

I

dcno,44 Catnpu4

JGP-There will be a meeting
of the Junior Girls Play stunts
committee at 4:30 p.m. today in
the League.
CAMP COUNSELORS-Members
of the Camp Counselors Club will
meet at 5 p.m. today in the small
lounge of the Women's Athletic
Building.
* * *
ATHLETIC MANAGERS-There
will be a house athletic manager's
meeting at 5:10 p.m. today in the
Women's Athletic Building.
MICHIGRAS-There will be a
meeting of the Michigras Central!
Committee at 7:30 p.m. today in
Rm. 3N of the Union.
* * ,
CO-REC. SKATING -The Co-
Recreational Skating Club will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today at the
Women's Athletic Building.
JGP-Junior Girls Play orches-
tra will rehearse at 8 p.m. today
in the League.

Or write: Engineering Personnel Office, Dept. COL, North American
Aviation, Columbus 16, Ohio.
NN
N OR TH A ME RICA N A p .T A AN
COLUMBUS DIVISION
NORTH AMERICAN HAS BUILT MORE AIRPLANES THAN ANY OTHER COMPANY IN THE WORLD
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

quality ci

rested
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Missile

Individual thorough,
expert attention
given to each garment
64". fbt%
17 HID10
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pistil

Graduates i1

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Physics

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I

COMPLETE TUXED(
Tux, shirt, tie, cummerb
"Cleaning the way you hav
Gold Bond
515 E. William

THAT XTRA DAY
SALE
150 DRESSES
nao100

+I"V"y"'".1 m'~a':; , ;r"; ""R;4:"'^ :?{;">:5:<.;::: : ? "":'ui" "'::::::":}~' ° '<'${"z":iJ "r4 aF.
". '~'...G 5 4 w ::'Vfllw'"'t"w::: {:S": . J ....u "d '1 ". ."Vi ::1.."":f (t: :lw
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DRESSY STYLES!
CASUALS!
AFTER-FIVE FROCKS!
All taken from regular stock
and drastically reduced!
All were two to four times their sale price.
Sizes 9-15 ... 10-44 ... 121 to 241/2... TalI 10-20
Group of Rrinestone
necklaces-pins-costume rings
originally were $4.00-$14.95
Today 1/2 price

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