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February 26, 1956 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-26
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Page Fourteen

THE MICIAIGAN

DAILY.

Sundav, Februarv 26, 1 95&

Sunday,. 'ebruary 26, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pag Forten HE ICHGA DALY unay. Fur yr 9 1 90

F

Sunday, February 26, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY~

TRANSPORTATION:
air and sea.

9

LONDON
Black-aCketed, stiff white-collar

. ._____ ;

1JRANSPORTATION to Europe
runs the gamut from orchids,
perfume and portal to portal car-
peting to the eight-day student
steamship.
Airline and steamship companies
both .offer a variety of accomoda-
tions to satisfy both the highly
discriminate and the more budget-
minded foreign adventurers.
F OR THE complete red carpet
treatment, a tr-vveler might
take Trans World Airline's "Am-
bassador," Air France's "Golden
Parisian" or a- plane like Pan
American's "President's Special."
First class round-trip air serv-
ice from New York City to Shan-

non, Ireland the nearest European
point runs $667.80 and more in
season, however, as contrasted to
$469.80 round-trip tourist class.
THE MAIN differences between
tourist and first class are the
number of stops, seating arrange-
ments and types of mels. The
same aircraft is used in both,
classes.
Although steamships offer no
reduction on a round-trip ticket,
air line service is about 10-per cent'
less on a round trip basis. Air
tickets can also be bought on a
time-payment plan.-
Off-season tickets are available
from Nov. 1 through March 31,

KENTUCKY DERBY
FRENCH LICK
Departing May 4 ... from $84.50
TRAVEL BUEU INC.
1313 S. University NO 2-5587

but travelers must leave and re-
turn within that period and must
purchase a round-trip ticket. The
off-season tourist rate is $429.80
round-trip, New York City to
Shannon.
STEAMSHIP travel generally in-
cludes three classes on the same
ship, although there are some
student ships that run almost en-
tirely tourist class.
First class steamship-style places
the same emphasis on luxury as
first class via air.
One way passage on the Queen
Elizabeth, the largest commercial
steamer (83,673 tons, with the
Queen Mary second at 81,235 and
the United States third at 53,300)
runs $380 from New York to South-
hampton during the summer sea-
son.
FACILITIES and prices become
less in the lower classes, with
cabin class running at $235 and
tourist at $187 on the same sailing.
The summer travel season runs
from April 16 through August 4,
and from July 2 through October
20. During the off-season, or
"thrift season," rates run 10 to 15
dollars less.

and the legacy of

i
f
i

By GEOFFREY DE DENEY
UNLIKE any other city in she
world London is, two cities.
Centered round St. Paul's Cathed-
ral, the Mansion House (residence
of the Lord Mayor), the Bank of
England,the Royal Exchange, the
Stock Exchange and Lloyd's, and
close to the great dock area is the
City of London.
Port, centre of , commerce and
finance, "the City" is the equiva-
lent of Wall Street with a life
and organization all of its own and
a mysterious informality familiar
only to those who work there,
black-jacketed, bowler-hatted, stiff
white-collared men who carry
tightly rolled umbrellas; a square
mile more densely inhabited and
busy by day than any other in
Europe, and by night a deserted
area peopled only by night watch-
men.
BUT three miles up the Thames
harrassed Members of Parlia-
ment give tea to troublesome con-
stituents on the terrace of the
Houses of Parliament overlooking
the river, in the shadow of Big
Ben and Westminister Abbey. Here

is the City of Westminister, the
governmental centre of the coun-
try.
Whitehall, with its administra-
tive offices, the Admiralty and
Horse Guards is here, opposite
the banqueting hall, all that re-
mains of the old palace of White-
hall, and from the windows of
which Charles I stepped out onto
the scaffold.
Close by is the palace of St.
James, successor to Whitehall as
a royal residence and centre of the
brilliant English society of the late
17th and early 18th centuries.
Violent and extravagant, yet of
great intellect and consummate
taste, the lords and commoners
who made up this assemblage were
no decadent aristocracy marking
out the vpassing of their age
with the steps of a careful gavotte
or minuet like their confreres at
Versailles. These were men, and
women too, who were the leadcrs-
of their country in government,
in ideas and taste, in wealth and
estates, and in vice and scandal.
History shows their achieve-
ments, the Restoration drama,
their wit and licentiousness, and
London is their monument.

TRETC
Regen
ham Pals+
the hear
society le
squares,
by Adam
and parki
great way
could bet
Dr. John
were valt
Much o
sult in p
is a man
street are
ed men's
promineni
eyes of w
Close b
the shoe
to be fou
that com
their ow:
papers to
them or.
and swim
over five
years an
have the
Tire s
windows

a great way

II

BOERSMA TRAVEL SERVICE
advises:
Now is the time to apply for steamship
accommodations for the summer of 1957.

-Photo--Robert F. Jones
THE PARIS BUM
... paid for by the Chamber of Commerce

.the real and the fake

I I

SIi

Brief at the knee-

(Continued from Page 2)
tourists. They paint rapidly and
with a degree of architectural skill,
rendering the church, the shops,
the roof-tops; in watercolored
splendor.
In one block, you count seven
art shops. Herein are offered the
completed works of Montmartre's
artists. Prices are cheap.
YOU STEP into a cafe for a
beer. One of the painters, a
squat little man with stained
clothes and brownish teeth, leaves
his easel and walks into the cafe.
"Rustic, isn't it?" he asks in
good English.
"Yes, I suppose so."
"You suppose so!" His eyes
widen. They too are brown-
stained. "This place is so rustic
it stinks." He wipes his mouth
with a pin-striped sleeve. "Buy
me a beer," he says.
"Okay."
"You see that bum on the steps
down the street?" he asks.
d "No."
"Well, then you're blind. You're
supposed to see him. Go look."
He's right. A grizzled old man,
wrapped in a dirty poplin rain-
coat, sleeps on the stoop of a stuc-
coed building down the street. He
snoozes on, impervious to the cov-

ert clicking of camera-shutters.
You go back to the cafe.
"Yeah, I saw him. He looks like
a bum all right."
"Well, he's not," says the
stained man. "He's getting paid
for sleeping there. By the Cham-
ber of, Commerce."
The stained man rubs, his chin
with the glass, then drinks off his
beer. "You want to see the real
France?"
"Well," you say, "I'd sort of
planned on something along those
lines."
"Then get the hell out of Paris.
You could live here for years and
never see the i eal thing.
"GET OUT into the provinces.
Walk, or ride a bike. Let
your hair grow and buy a cheap
suit. Don't ever open your mouth.
With the first word of American,
the real Europe withers and dies.
"And in dying it stretches out
its hand. Not for comfort, my
friend. Never for comfort or pity.
For money."
The stained man turns his
stained gaze down into the glass.
From the street comes the sound
of clicking shutters, the rustle of
many-zeroed bills, and one high,
eager voice.
"Gee whiz, Mommer. La vie
boheme, hey?"

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Blessed are they who run
around in circles, for theis
shall- be known as wheels.

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BOERSMA TRAVEL SERVICE is the ONLY AUTHOf
ticket holding agent in Ann Arbor for all steamship

airlines and tour operators, domestic and foreign.
our appointments include:

A pa:

S'TEAMSHIP LINES:
CUNARD LINE
UNITED STATES LINES
FRENCH LINES
HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
SWEDISH AMERICA LINE
AMERICAN EXPORT LINE
HOME LINES
GREEK LINE
GRACE LINE
UNITED FRUIT LINE
MATSON LINES
NORTH GERMAN LLOYD
AMERICAN PRESIDENT LINES
,NORWEGIANAMERICA LINE
CLIPPER LINE
GEORGIAN BAY LINE
TOUR OPERATORS:
AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY
THOMAS COOK & SON
BROWNELL TOURS
CARTAN TOURS
OLSON TOURS
UNIVERSITY TRAVEL COMPANY
STOP TOURS
HILTON TOURS,
HAPPINESS TOURS
SITA TOURS
TREASURE TOURS
MARSH TOURS
BOKESMa

AIRLINES:
AMERICAN AIRLINES
CAPITAL AIRLINES
DELTA & C&S AIRLINE
BRANIFF AIRLINES
UNITED AIRLINES
PAN AMERICAN AIRV
TRANS WORLD AIRLit
NORTHWEST AIRLINE
EASTERN AIRLINES
AIR FRANCE
LUFTHANSA
SCANDINAVIAN AIRLI
BRITISH OVERSEAS Al
KLM ROYAL DUTCH /
SABENA AIRLINES
SWISSAIR
SERVICES:
TRAVELERS CHECKS
TRAVEL INSURANCE
HOTEL RESERVATIONS
GIFT SERVICE
THEATRE TICKETS
CAR RENTALS
CAR PURCHASES ABR4
TRAVEL FILM SERVICE
GROUP TRAVEL
CONVENTION TRAVEL
VISA SERVICE
PASSPORT ASSISTANC

Y

BERMUDA HOSE from $1. 50
pan 1301)w

frOmZ

.93

rEAVEL SER

STUDENT BICYCLE

12-14Nickels ArcadeAnn Arr Mich.

r

y Domestic Air Reservations-NO 2-3155

Foreign & Tour Dept.-

A.

Da S AT!

IUJR.RY COATS

SHOP

Sm39 ith ! ;Unii
..NO 8=427

N* iAHF1N CEANGES

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