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May 27, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-27

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FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P A f3 r rn'V.

FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY W~ A I~U WVW7W

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tro

WAA Holds
Softball, Golf
Tournaments
Softball .. .
Couzens Hall's all sophomore
team emerged victorious in the
women's all-campus softball tour-
nament, defeating Martha Cook in
the finals recently by a score of
3d-2.
Headed by captain Pat Comn-
stock, "Couzens showed excellent
hitting power," according to Marge
Blake, who was umpiring the
match with Joan Farrell, women's
physical education instructor.
Pitchers for the teams were Bar-
bara Eyre for Couzens and Cyn-
thia Diamond for Martha Cook.
Mary Jean Shaw was captain of
the Martha Cook team.
Miss Blake also mentioned that
"the Martha Cook team had some
t substitutes who had never played
on the team before."
The tournament started with 40
teams competing in a round 'robin
tourney, composed of eight leagues
with five teams in each league.
This tournament continued for five
weeks, when a winner was selected
from each league.
League winners were Fletcher
Hall, Couzens Hall, Kleinstuck,
Helen Newberry, Betsy Barbour,
Martha Cook, Delta Gamma and
Delta Delta Delta. These residence
teams competed in an elimination
tournament from which Martha
Cook and Couzens Hall met in the
finals.
The tournament was sponsored
by the softball club of the Women's
Athletic Association, under the
leadership of club manager, Toni
Sacchetti and Robin Platt.
Golf'. . .
Finals of the women's golf tour-
nament will be played Wednesday
between Jane Grothwahl and Mar-
cia Morris.
Participants for this match were
decided when Miss Grothwahl beat
Virginia O'Connor, 3-2, and Linda
Johaunny defaulted to Miss Morris
at a recent match.
Others competing in the WAA
golf tournament were Harriet Gar-
Alnkel, Grace Moore and Kay Leo.
Miss Leo is manager of the golf
club, which is sponsoring the
match.

Varied Events Planned
By Union Committees

Bluebook Ball . .«
Heading the Union's program
for the remaining days of school
will be the bi-annial Bluebook
Ball, to be held from 9 p.m. to
midnight tomorrow in the Union
Ballroom.
A traditional giant bluebook,
which students may autograph,
will tower above dancing couples
as they swing and sway to the
music of Red Johnson and his or-
chestra.
A sprinkling centerpiece, espec-
ially secured for the dance, will
add a spring floral effect to the
decorations.
Tickets for the dance may be
purchased at the Union today and
tomorrow. They will also be sold
during the dance.
Table Carving . .
Union officials have announced
that there is still time for all sen-
ior men to carve their names on
the senior's table in the Union
south cafeteria. Carving tools will
be available at the coat check
room in the basement of the Un-
ion, upon presenting I.D. cards.
"Senior men have been leaving
momentos of their stay at the Uni-
versity since 1902," Ron Rosenthal,
staffman-in-charge, remarked. '

Travel Service . . .
Students wishing a ride home
and drivers desiring. riders may
check the Travel Service file in the
Union lobby. Students are request-
ed by Union officials to fill out a
card and leave it on file
Students are also reminded to
check the bulletin board for a less
extensive listing
Exam Week Movies...
Free movies for all students will
be presented at 8 p.m. Sunday and
Thursday in the Union Ballroom.
Playing Sunday will be "City
Across the River," starring Steph-
en McNally and Barbara Whiting,
while "The Cruel Sea," with Jack
Hawkins, Donald Linden, and Vir-
ginia McKenna will be t shown
Thursday.
"The Cruel Sea" is the screen
story from the best-selling novel
concerning the battle of the At-
lantic. The realistic story of tough
gangs who roam the big city
streets is portrayed in "City Across
lthe River."

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
BOB LUECKE, BRENDA BEHBRING AND MARY'ARTZ SERVE AN EAST QUAD COED

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
SUE MORTON WAITS ON A CUSTOMER

Students Gain Experience, Earn Money in Campus Jobs

By ROSE PERLBERG
"Over one-half of students at-
tending the University seek some
sort of employment to help pay
college expenses," John C. Case,
Student Placement Service inter-
viewer said recently.
Located in the Administration
Building's personnel offices, the
University-sponsored Service at-
tempts to aid students in finding
jobs that will help to alleviate
room and board and tuition costs.
"We have no way of knowing
exactly how many students work,"
Case remarked, "since not all are
hired through the University."
Jobs Described
The interviewer described some
types of employment that students
are now holding, which were ob-
tained through the aid of the Ser-
vice.
Meal jobs in fraternity and so-
rority houses, caretaker work in
apartments, cash jobs in Univer-
sity departments and jobs outside
of the University, including part-

time and full-time employment in
retail stores, were op the list.
Perhaps one of the most popular
ways to earn some extra pocket
money or to supplement the col-
lege budget, is through a job in a
residence hall dining room. Paid
by the hour, students usually put
in from three to ten hours weekly.
Kitchens Preferred
Kitchen employment is often
preferred because of its conven-
ience. "Working in your own dor-
mitory still leaves plenty of time
for studying," Larissa Wytwycky, a
member of the dining room squad
declared.
Typical of many students who
hold part-time jobs, Sue Fricker
Morton got hers through the
Placement Service.I
Mrs. Morton, a bride of one
month, has been employed in a
local jewelry store for about six
months. Selling everything from
diamonds to costume jewelry, the
senior majoring in elementary edu-
cation likes her job because it gives
her "a chance to meet so many
people."
Stresses Dependability
The former head of Women's
Orientation stresses dependability
as one of the most important
things in a part-time job. "You
have to be more consisteht than
when you're employed full-time.":
President of Delta Delta Delta,
Mrs. Morton also finds time to
play in the Symphony Band. Since
she and her husband will be living
in Ann Arbor, she plans to attend
graduate school this summer work-
ing toward a masters degree in
education.

Canadian exchange student Paul
Brodie is among those who uses
talent plus experience gained at
the School of Music, to make some
extra money.
Active on Campus
His four-piece band, the Star-
dusters, formed last year, has been
quite active on campus. Perhaps
best-known for their appearancese
at Union Little Club dances, the
Stardusters also performed at Gu-
lantics and have played at fra-
ternity houses.
With Sil Koltyk at the keyboard,
Bob Elliott beating the drums, Ed
Draw strumming the bass and Bro-
die blowing saxophone or clarinet,
the group specializes in South
American music.
The sophomore music education
major, who plans to teach instru-
mental music, met his band mem-
bers in the school of music and
hopes to "keep it going throughout
my stay at the University." Dee
Evans often appears as vocalist.
Sings and Kibitzess
"We try to entertain as well as
play," Brodie commented, "by
singing and kibitzing. Audiences
seem to like it better than just
playing," he explained.
Since 1946, students have been
employed as "guinea pigs" in ex-
periments run under the auspices
of the Vision Research Laboratory.
Recently they took part in an
experiment testing the Young-
Hemholtz three receptor color vis-
ion theory, involving persons of
normal color vision, one totally

color blind, and one red-green col-
or blind.
"Many students in psychology
use these experiments as part of
their work toward a doctorate de-
gree," Bob Hefner, graduate stu-
dent in charge of the color vision
test, remarked.

He explained that any grade
student who wants to run an
periment can hire "guinea p
through the University's Stud
Placement Service, or in spe
cases, such as in his group, throe
Health Service.

gate
ex-
igs"
lent
3cial

l-M Night
There will be no Friday night
co-recreation at the I-M Build-
ing for the rest of the semester.

staffman-in-charge, remarked.

U

'AA

I

RADIO DISPATCHED

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ugh IG 9 QC:7 (Z-"
We at Ramsay Printers extend to
,graduates our heartiest congratulations
and wishes for much happiness in your
future endeavors.
QAnd to all students we wish good fortune
on your finals. We are looking forward to
seeing you in the fall.
RAMSAY PRINTlRS. Inc. PHoNE NO 8-7900

NO 2-4477

24 Hours Service

We Go Anywhere

Special Exam Week Hours
Announced for U' Libraries

YOUR BEST BET -CALL A VET

I

L
F

f t

rf

__ _ _ 1

-I'll

THIS WEEKEND

I

III

Special hours for campus librar-
ies have been announced for the
examination period by University
officials.
The General Library will be
open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily
except Sunday when it will be
open from 2 to 6 p.m. These hours
will be in effect until Monday,
June 6, when regular hours will
again be in effect.
During the examination period,
the*fDivisional Libraries will ob-
serve their regular schedule, in-
cluding Monday, Memorial Day,
with the exception of the Bureau of
Government Library located in the
Rackham Building which is closed
on the holiday.
The Social Science Library will
Parents' Housing
To provide housing for par-
ents during commencement
weekend, the Student Activities
Office of the Union is organ-
izing a file of available accom-
modations. Persons with rooms
they wish to rent, may send a
postcard to the chairman of
the Student Services Commit-
tee, Michigan Union.
The name, address, phone
number, type of room available,
price and if the rooms will be
available for housing next fall,
should be included on the post-
card.
Anyone desiring accommoda-
tions for commencement, may
inquire in the housing file

be open as usual for the next two
Sundays, as a study hall. In addi-
tion, the Angell Hall Study Hall
will be open the same hours on
those Sundays.
Other libraries on campus will
operate on their usual schedules
during the examination period.

i

Ii

t1
A 1
-S.-.

11

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Have
Hove o wonderful vacation.

fun!
Enjoy yourselves

I

11

Men for that
DISTINGUISHED
LOOK
Of X. aS6e4b
715 N. University

11

thoroughly. Congratulations to the graduate
It has been a pleasure to have your patronage
this past school year and we'll be looking
forward to seeing you again next Fall.
Visit our Main Street store when it comes time
to think about your new wardrobe, and remember,
the State Street store has the very smartest in
decorating aids to make your room
have comfort and personality.

"1

I

I

FOR RENT
2 furnished Apts. for
single men. Walking dis-
tance to Campus. One
will accommodate 5 stu-
dents, the other 4. Avail-
able Sept., 1955 - can
be seen now. Ph. NO 3-
5139 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.
or 5 P.M. to 7 P.M.
A ki~l AI

11

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II I )TAL -%I1 Y 1'.fl 7.I5%VY *Ilt IV- IY. . . 0. * . -'- i I

It bend, sit -- never binds a bit. Contoured backI

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