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May 27, 1955 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1955-05-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1955

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Sixty-Fifth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
- - UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only. This must be noted in all reprints.
FRIDAY, MAY 27, 1955 NIGHT EDITOR: LEW HAMBURGER
APPLA USE, GRATITUDE, AND HOPES:
A Look at Less Pressing
Campus Phenomena
W ITH CLASSROOMS briefly abandoned for Gratitude to those professors who've man-
the day-long "study period" and the re- aged, through challenging days of the warm
maining few days incredibly packed with the months, to maintain stimulating classrooms
condensed exam schedule, we might take a and to wind up the semester more than satis-
look at a few of the less pressing campus phe- factorily.
nomena-and give: Anti-procrastination devices, whatever they
might be, to students who still haven't been
Applause to the Plant Department for its overcome by the urgency of studying for and
almost overnight transformation of the phy- taking all exams in what is in many cases much
sical campus into a well-manicured and land- too short a time.
scaped area. The men in the trucks have ac- To the exam schedule calendaring group,
complished a worthwhile job, with appreciated hopes for a second thought in forthcoming
results. semesters-with the ideal of at least one free
Applause, too, to Prof. Percival Price, whose weekend for reviewing before finals.
frequent carillon concerts give the campus And the best to those being hustled through
one of its few vestiges of tradition and healthy the mechanics of their official commencement.
sentimentality. -Jane Howard
HARVARD U. REPORT:
MP E
More Than Public Esteem

"You Want To Flunk Out Too?"

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Books for Asia...
To the Editor:
ON BEHALF of the central com-
mittee of the Books for Asia
Drive we would like to take this
opportunity to acknowledge our
appreciation to those who helped
to make this drive a complete suc-
cess.
The nearly 4,000 texts collected
are indicative of the generous res-
ponse of the students and facult?
of the University.
Especially helpful was the Uni-
versity General Library which con-
tributed 1,500 books. We also wish
to thank Dr. James Davis, Director

of the International Center, Mr.
Nunn of the General Library, and
Dewitt Baldwin of Lane Hall for
their cooperation.
--Tom Sawyer, '58
Al Williams '57
Jim Elsman '58
Americanism
"No man's race or creed or color
should count against him in his...
rights. Only second-class Ameri-
canism tolerates second-class citi-
zenship. It's time to get rid of what
remains of both, and that includes
rewriting the unfair provisions of
the McCarran Immigration Act."
--Boston Common

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EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF .BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 28 to June 8, 1955
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates with a scheduled exam falling on June
6, 7 or 8 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
period. The instructor may arrange an alternate time with no-
tice to the scheduling committee.

I

DURING -THE YEAR 1953-54 Harvard at- tere-
tracted an unusual amount of attention in ty, a
the nation's press. ni k
Not all of this was intended to be helpful. gras
Since the university's function is a limited one ancey
to work single-mindedly for the deepened in- It
tellectualization of experience, and since the the
majority of men are not irrepressibly eager the
to increase the role of intellect in their person- was
al lives, it follows almost inevitably that uni- olde
versities-even if they make no mistakes-will reve
occasionally fail to receive the honor and re- depe
erme
spect to which we on the inside reasonably ther
feel they are entitled. them
on tI
Indeed it should not be surprising if at times the
universities come actively to be resented. The
little boy who hates school unfortunately con- N'
tinues to lurk in too many adults and needs 1i
very little encouragement to reassert himself. suff
Nevertheless one can detect at least a grudging her
popular recognition of the importance of col- plac
leges and universities in the fact that during But
excessively disturbed and troubled periods in than
our national life they are apt to be singled out B
for criticism as though it were in their pow- gov
er to have prevented the difficulty. this
yea
S O PERHAPS we should not be too concerned ofo
if Harvard seemed sometimes lastyear to be inca
abused unjustifiably. Though recent publici- C
ty concerning the University has been much Uni
better, it would be excessively innocent to as- the
sume our troubles from this direction are per- pea
manently at an end. It Is perhaps worthy of It i
record at this time, however, before the dif- stru
ficulties of last year are completely forgotten,
that through a very happy conjunction of in-
SOVIET-YUGOSLAV MEETING:

st, understanding, and loyalty, the facul-
administration, governing boards, and alum-
kept their sense of proportion and their
p on fact; they were not thrown off bal-
e, but saw this clamor against the Univer-
for what it was.
was admittedly a complex situation, but
central issue was whether the University
to continue to govern herself in an age-
and tested manner, or whether she was to
rse, her earlier pattern of thoughtful, in-
iendent behavior to begin now to be gov-
ed by outside pressure. For Harvard men
re could never have been any serious doubt
this point, troublesome as the issue was for
moment.
4W that the emotional intensity has spent
itself, it is happily clear that Harvard did not
er, but grew in popular respect because of
refusal to make concessions in order to
cate an irascible, if limited, public opinion.
there is a more important consideration
n public esteem.
ecause the faculty administration, and
erning boards worked and stood together in
difficult situation prolonged during two
rs, a very precious internal health and sense
community within the University have been
alculably strengthened.
'oncerning "the general condition of the
versity," I am happy at the end to say that
pride Harvard men feel in Harvard ap-
rs, with reason to be strong and flourishing.
s my dearest hope that this timely and con-
uctive force will now continue to grow.
-Harvard University President's
Report (1953-54)

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
FCC Lady Getting Fired

a

Tues.
June 7
AM

REGULAR
Wed. Wed.
June 8 June 8
AM PM

EXAM TIME
Mon. Mon.
June 6 June 6
AM PM

Tues.
June 7
PM

By DREW PEARSON
WHILE ONE lady in high office
T who has helped cause con-
fusion in the polio crisis is plan-
ning to bow out, another lady who
has done a terrific job for the
American public in regard to tele-
vision is being fired.
The first lady, of course, is Mrs.
Oveta Culp Hobby, who will leave
the Cabinet when the Salk vac-
cine confusion has died down and
when she will not be retreating
under fire.
The second lady is Miss Frieda
Hennock, first woman ever to be
appointed to the Federal Com-
munications Commission, who is
being dropped as her term expires
in June. Her replacement will be
Richard Mack, a Florida utilities
commissioner, reported to be a
friend of the telephone company.
MEANWHILE, scores of little
broadcasters and TV independents
meeting in Washington this week
paid tribute to the lone lady who
has fought the battles of the small
radio-TV stations.
It was Commissioner Hennock
who demanded and got 257 TV
channels set aside for education.
It was Miss Hennock who fought
valiantly for the smaller ultra high
frequency stations which have
been blanheted out by the big net-
works.
It was Miss Hennock alone who
dissented from giving American
Tel and Tel an $80,000,000 increase
in rates, it was Miss Hennock who
fought for 800 small daytime ra-
dio stations, who campaigned
against crime and horror on tele-,
vision, and who opposed the in-
creasing trend toward monopoly
of communications.
THE DEMOCRATS have had
their noses so relentlessly rubbed
in the charge of being soft-to-
ward-Communists that it will be
interesting to see what they do
about Ike's recent error in the
same direction.
He has just appointed a man to
the Subversive Control Board who
was definitely soft toward the

Communist film-writers in Holly-
wood. Ex-Congressman John S.
Wood of Georgia, the Eisenhower
appointee in question, also paid
$15 initiation fee to join the Ku
Klux Klan though later, he says,
backing out; also hired a former
Klansman, Walter Lecraw, to be
Counsel of the Un-American Ac-
tivities Committee.
member of the Subversive Con-
trol Board will have to pass judg-
ment on.
* * *
WOOD'S RECORD is so unusual
that Capital observers were flab-
bergasted at his appointment. One
explanation is that Wood is the
uncle of Ike's golfing friend, Bob-
by Jones, which is a fact, though
Jones has kept aloof from politics
in the past.

Back in 1945, the old Dies Com-
mittee had accumulated informa-
tion that some of the top film-
writers in Hollywood were Com-
munists. So, when Congressman
Wood inherited the Dies Commit-
tee in July 1945, one of the first
scheduled jobs was to probe Hol-
lywood.
But Wood, when Chairman of
the committee, did absolutely no-
thing about probing Hollywood.
He simply let the information
gather dust in his files. Finally, in
December of 1946, after the Demo-
crats had lost control of Congress
and Wood was about to step down,
he went out to Hollywood and was
wined and dined. But he made
no investigation.
(Copywright, 1955, the Bell Syn. Inc.)

Mon
May
7 - 101

SPECIAL PERIOD FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. S
30 . May 31 June 1 June 2 June 3 Ju
PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-1

Sat.
ne 4
10 PM

Each student should receive notification from his
as to the time and place of his examination.

Monday
Tuesday

REGULAR SCHEDULE
(at 8 Monday, May 30
(at 9 Wednesday, June 1
(at 10 Saturday, May 28
(at 11 Tuesday, May 31
(at 12 Thursday, June 2
(at 1 Thursday, June 2
(at 2 Friday, June 3
(at 3 Saturday, June 4

instructor
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

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9
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11
1
2
3

Mondiay, May 30
Wednesday, June 1
Saturday, May 28
Tuesday, May 31
Thursday, June 2
Friday, -June 3
Saturday, June 4

Patching Family Quarrel

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
AP Foreign News Analyst
A FAMILY squabble is about to be patched
up in Belgrade.
The old tyrant of the family is dead. The
survivors are saying, in effect, it was all the
old man's fault.
Marshal Nilola Bulganin, now Soviet pre-
mier, once likened President Tito of Yugo-
slavia to Judas Iscariot.
But today President Tito says Bulganin, So-
viet Communist boss N. S. Khrushchev, Soviet
trade expert A. I. Mikoyan and the rest of
the Moscow party are "courageous." They go
to Belgrade in humility, admitting the genius
Stalin was wrong after all.
Seeking only friendship, said Khrushchev,
the Russians journey to Yugoslavia "with open
souls and pure hearts."
IN BOTH THE Soviet Union and Yugoslavia,
there are strong indications that anxiety to
ease international tensions is in direct ratio to
internal distress. In both countries the dis-
tress is fairly apparent.
The Soviet economy, with its vast emphapt
The Daily Staff
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig......................Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers..............................City Editor
Jon Sobeloff..........................Editorial Director
Pat Roelofs......... .......Associate City Editor
Becky Conrad..........................Associate Editor
Nan Swinehart.........................Associate Editor
Dave Livingston.......................... Sports Editor
Hanley Gurwin.................Associate Sports Editor
Warren Wertheimer.............Associate Sports Editor
Roz Shlimovitz......................... Women's Editor
Janet Smith .................Associate Women's Editor
John Hirtzel......................... Chief Photographer
Business Staff

on heavy industry, is top-heavy. The internal
Soviet political struggle has not been settled.
The Yugoslav economy remains in poor
shape. Like the Soviet Union, it suffers from a
lopsided bureaucracy, from failure of agricul-
ture, from inability to provide consumer goods,
from growing disaffection among the rising,
conservative middle classes as the Old Bolshe-
viks die out.
EITHER REGIME would be in grave danger
in a new war. Both are passionately in-
terested in neutralism, for slightly different
reasons. The Yugoslavs want it because they
fear an arms race will lead to war and the
end of their regime. The Soviet Union wants
it because the growing strength of the West-
ern ring around the USSR dampens Red en-
thusiasm for aggressive expansion, politically
or otherwise.
Communist Yugoslavia often speaks about
peace in words like those of the Soviet party's
Pravda. Tito, walking a tightrope, contends he
is trying to steer an independent middle course
between West and East.
But in the opinion of some competent out-
side observers, Tito has none too strong a grip
on his own party.
A settlement with the Soviet party could
bring to influence and power that group with-
in Tito's party known as the "Cominformists,"
who never really approved the break with Mos-
cow.
THE MEETING in Belgrade underscores this:
so far as the Soviet Union is concerned,
Stalin was the main sinner in the Yugoslav
quarrel.
But in the opinion of Moscow-until its new
and highly flexible post-Stalin foreign policy
was unveiled-Tito was the main sinner against
world communism. The blame was not laid to
Yugoslavia or the body of the Yugoslav party.
A thoughtful look by Tito at the Soviet Un-

(Continued from Page 3)
good knowledge of Spanish to work
in the Export Dept.
Univ. of Cincinnati, College of Medi-
cine, has a position for a girl who has
had Chem. and if possible Biology in
the Dept. of Physiology as a Research
Assist.
A Detroit company is interested in
a woman ,English major, with Teacher
Training for a writing position.
St. Regis Paper Co., New York, N.Y.,
is looking for a Sales Engr. to work in
various parts of U.S. Prefer a man with
a degree in Mech. or Elect. E., with
some experience, 28-35 years of age.
An Ann Arbor firm has an opening
for a man or woman with a BA or
BS in Math. Work will be in engrg.
application of math. Prefer someone
who has had experience with digital
& electronic computers.
Trane Co. LaCrosse, Wis., is looking
for people for the following positions:
Mgr, Mkt. Research-prefer major in
Mkt. Research or Statistics and ap-
proximately five yrs.; Advertising Dept.
-prefer major i nAdvertising or Jour-
nalism, must have completed military
service; Systems and Procedures An-
alyst-degree in BusAd with Acctg.
major, must have exp. in systems and
procedures work; Industrial Copy Writ-

er; Ind. Rel. Trainee-Ind. Mgt, major
preferred, must have completed mili-
tary service, should have had some
summer or part time exp. in mfg, plant;
Jr. Buyer-BusAd or Engrg. preferred,
must have completed military service;
Factor Cost Supervisor-BurAd or Ind.
E., and some exp.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Td. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
Academic Notices
History 50 Final Examination, Wed.,
June 1, 2:0045:00 p.m.: A-L Natural
Science Auditorium; M-T, 102 Archi-
tecture; V-Z, 33 Angell Hall.
Doctoral Examination for Thomas
Charles Bissot, Chemistry; thesis: "A
Study of the Reactions of Diborane
with Methyl Substituted Hydroxyla-
mines and with Phosphorus Trifluor-
ide," Fri., May 27, 3003 Chemistry Bldg.,
at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, R. W. Parry.
Doctor Examination for Joshua Har-
lan Carey, Anatomy; thesis: "Certain
Anatomical and Functional Interrela-
tions between the Tegmentum of the
Midbrain and the Basal Ganglia," Fri.,
May 27, 4558 East Medical Bldg., at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, E. C. Crosby.
Doctoral Examination for William
Louis Fowler,AEducation; thesis: "A
Comparative Analysis of Pupil Per-
formance on Conventional and Culture-
Controlled Mental Tests," Fri., May 27,
East Council Room, Rackham Bldg., at
8:00 a.m. Chairman, H. G. Ludlow.
Doctoral Examination for Horace
Floyd Quick, Wildlife Management;
thesis: "The Fur Resource of a Wild-
erness Region in Northern British Co-
lumbia," Tues., June 7, 1045 Natural
Science Bldg., at 9:00 a.m. Chairman,
W. W. Chase.
Doctoral Examination for William
Clinton Ellet, Jr., Political Science;
thesis: "Atomic Cities: The Atomic
Energy Act and the States," Tues.,
June 7, 617 Haven Hall, at 9:30 a.m.
Chairman, E. S. Brown.
Doctoral Examination for Robert H.
Pealy, Political Science; thesis: "A
Comparative Study of Property Tax
Administration in Illinois and Michi-
gan with Emphasis on State Adminis-
tradition of Inter-County Equalization,"
Tues., June 14, East Council Room,

English 1, 2
Sociology 54, 60
Psychology 31, Group A
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Chemistry 4, 8, 23 (1, 3, 6)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32,
61, 62
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 2
Political Science 2
Psychology 31, Group B
Botany 1, 2 ,
COLLEGE,

Thursday, June
Thursday, June
Thursday, June
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Monday, June 6
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Wednesday, June
Wednesday, June

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

2
2
2

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

8
8

M.-I. 135
EE 5
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
M.-I. 136
Chemistry 4, 8, 23 (1, 3
CE 21, 22
Drawing 2 Group A, 3
PE 31, 32
EM 1,2
CE 151
Ch.-Met. 113
PE 11, 13
Drawing 1, 2x
English 11
Ch.-Met. 1
Ch.-Met. 107
Drawing 2 Group B

3, 6)

OF ENGINEERING
Monday, May 30
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Saturday, June 4
Saturday, June 4
Monday, June 6
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Wednesday, JuneI
Wednesday, June
Wednesday, June P
Wednesday, June f

2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5

I

I

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

by Dick Bibier

s

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V,
I 1
./f" #

8
8
8

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the' con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engi-
neering Building between May 2 and May 13 for instruction...
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin hoard in the Schonl -of Music.

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