100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 25, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1955.

THE MICHIGAN" DAILY

PAGS M

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1955 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY eAGE LIVE

WPM

League Council Plans
Summer Entertainment

0

Students who will be attending
summer school this year need not
worry about the lack of social ac-
tivities on campus.
The League Council has set up
a program of activities for each
week of the summer session which
will begin June 20. Coeds and men
will find these activities a good
way for relaxation from the drudA
gery of classes during the hot sum-
mer days.
Students who are interested in
learning to square dance or who
wish toimprove their square danc-
ing will have the opportunity to do
so at the weekly lessons. These
lessons will begin at 7:30 p.m and
will be held every Monday.
Dancing Lessons To Be Given
Mr. John Redd will be the in-
structor for the dancing lessons to
be held at Palmer Field.
Lessons will also be given in
ballroom dancing for students who
prefer a less strenuous type of
dancing than square dancing. Mr.
Rudolph Martinak will be the in-
structor for these lessons which

will be held in the second floor of
the League.
Students just learning ballroom
dancing will meet at 7 p.m. every
Wednesday of the summer session.
Intermediate lessons will also be
given at 8 p.m. every Wednesday
Card Playing Encouraged
If students would prefer to play
cards on hot summer evenings the
League is planning lessons and
tournaments. Lessons will be avail-
able to all coeds and men who are
interested in learning to play
bridge.
For the more advanced bridge
players the League is planning to
continue to sponsor the annual
summer tournaments.
S t u d e n t s attending summer
school will be able to get ac-
quainted with each other at the
mixers which will be held every
Friday evening throughout the
summer.
Music for these mixers will be
provided by Al Townsend and his
band.

HERBERiART TARE

"T'S THE
PILT£R
~YOU'LL
.SMOKE
S WITH
PLEASURE!'

KAY OLSON

SUSANNE WATT

MARJORIE CREW

TERRY CARNEY

Parents Announce Students' Engagements

+0

Wonderful things happen when you wear itI

Olson - Herreshoff
Marilyn Kay Olson's engage-
ment to Nathanael Greene Her-
reshoff III, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney De W. Herreshoff of Bris-
tol, R.I., was announced by her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred J.
Olson of Grand Haven. .
Miss Olson is a sophomore in
the literary college.
Mr. Herreshoff obtained his'
bachelor of arts degree from Wil-
liam and Mary College and his
master's degree from this Univer-
sity. He has accepted a teaching
position in Battle Creek.
The couple plans to be married
Friday, August 26, in Grand
Haven.
* * *
Watt- Pollard
Mr. and Mrs. William T. Watt of
St. Joseph announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Susanne
Jane, to Richard Allan Pollard,
son of Rev. and Mrs. Thomas E.
Pollard of Jackson.
Miss Watt is a senior in the
School of Music, and is a member
of Gamma Phi Beta.
Mr. Pollard, a freshman in the

Medical School attended Albion
College for three years where he
was a member of Phi Eta Sigma,
honorary; Beta Beta Beta, honor-
ary and Delta Tau Delta. At this
University, he is affiliated with
Phi Chi.
The couple plans to be married
in St. Joseph this August.
Chew - Gathmann
The engagement of Marjorie
Nance Chew.to Emil A. Gathmann,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark H.
Gathmann of Howell was an-,
nounced by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Russell W. Chew of Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
Miss Chew, a freshman in the'
literary college, is a member of
Kappa Alpha Theta.
Mr. Gathmann is also a fresh-
man in the literary college and is
affiliated with Beta Theta Pi.
* *
Carney -Johnson
Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Carney
of Plymouth, announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Terry
Eleanor, to Kenneth Courtney

Johnson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray-
mond K. Johnson of Muskegon.
Miss Carney is a sophomore in
the School of Education and is a
member of Collegiate Sorosis.
Mr. Johnson, a junior in the
School of Architecture and Design,
is affiliated with Delta Tau Delta.
The couple plans t4 have a
December wedding.
* * *
Friedman - Brookfield
Audrey Jane Friedman's en-
gagement to Ernest G. Brookfield,

son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Brook-
field of Jackson, was announced
by her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Louis
M. Friedman of Lakewood, O.
Miss Friedman is a junior in the
School of Nursing and is affiliated
with Delta Phi Epsilon.
Mr. Brookfield, a senior in the
Medical School, is affiliated with
Phi Sigma Delta and Phi Chi. He
is also a member of Alpha Omega
Alpha and Phi Beta Kappa, hon-
orary. Mr. Brookfield plans to in-
tern at Philadelphia General Hos-
pital.

"YOU CAN
TASTE THE
FINE
TOBACCO
FLAVORI"

ODERN

r

SIZE

NW

4 ~ -..

I

Ft"ILTER TIP TAREYTON'
with the Pearl-Gray Activated Charcoal Filter
PRODUCT OF d/a " , c/ o6

, ,
__..

American Friends' Project
jWill Help ForeignWomen

'DON'T PANIC':
Rules Can Halt Accidents
During Memorial Weekend

The inevitable choice for the special occasion-because a
fragrance is as memorable as the gown you wear. Per-
fume from $3; de luxe toilet water and dusting powder,
each $1.75 (all plus tax). Created in England, made in
U.S.A. Yardley of London, Inc., 620 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. C.
FOR ALL1
YARDLEY PRODUCTS
COME TO
i11h Q Quarr -
320 South State NO 3-4121

By HARRIETTE SIMINGTON v
Lucky students who don't have
exams scheduled for May 30 will
take advantage ofthe Memorial
Day Weekend at surrounding lakes.
However, the Memorial Weekend
is usually the beginning of num-
erous water accidents that contin-
ue throughout the summer. If a
few rules were obeyed, even the
poorest swimmer would be in lit-
tle danger of drowning.
Swimming and boating, two
ways of relaxing prior to finals,
can be fun but may become dan-
gerous past-times.
Swimming Rules Stated
Swimming rules are simply stat-
ed and simpler to follow. Swim-
ming areas should always be in-
vestigated before a group attempts
to swim or dive. Avoidance ofaover-
exertion is necessary especially at
the beginning of the season since
this over-exertion is a primary
cause ofrdrowning accidents.
Flotation devices such as inner
tubes and water wings may be fun
to use, but weak swimmers often
place too much confidence in them.
Most drownings occur close to
shore and even non-swimmers may
aid a person in trouble by throw-
ing any handy implement. Jackets,
oars, towels and boards have all
been known to save a drowning
person when tossed to him. Weak
swimmers are cautioned not to try
to save a person by going in after
someone in trouble, for double ac-
cidents have often been caused in
this way.
Advice To Avoid Panic
"Don't panic" is not an uncom-

rmon saying when speaking of
drowning accidents. The only way
to avoid panic according to Fritzie
Gareis, Michifish coach and Wo-
men's Physical Education instruc-
tor, is to know how to swim and to
always be aware of the situation
you are in.
The foremost safety rule for the
boating enthusiast to follow is for
him to learn to swim and be able
to handle himself in deep water,
before entering a row boat or ca-
noe. Ans one who has seen a canoe
turn over knows that although it
is upside down the canoe will con-
tinue to float. Rowboats will also
float when overturned and have
been known to stay afloat when
three quarters full of water.
.m .******, o..-...

Coeds have been interviewed and
selected to participate in the "Am-
erican Friend" program which is
being sponsored by the League.
Those coeds which have been se-
lected to assist a foreign woman
student become acquainted with
American and University customs
include Lois Steinberger, Sally My-
ers, Kathryn McColl and Dina Bre-
dendiecht.
Sally Gardner; Patti Drake, Sal-
ly Kornwise, Shirley Eckwall and
Janet Burwell are among those co-
eds selected by the interviewing
committee. Also chosen were Judy
Tatham, Gerry Van Dusen, Jan
Greenbell and Margaret Moreland.
American Friends' Selected
Continuing the list of coeds who
will act as "American Friends" are
Meredith Tigel, Jean Fry, Dianne
Duncan, Hermine Weinert, Chris-
tine Culp, Genevieve Leland and
Peggy Scott.
Norma Van Tuyl, Sally Lund-
quist, Geraldine O'Hara, Ruth Ba-
sichis, Mary Frances Jones and
Mary Lee Birmingham were also
selected by the committee.
Participating in the program will
be Gloria Sparber, Nancy Wright,
Joyce Judson and Alice James.
List Continued
Included as "American Friends"
to foreign women students are
Kathy Lund, Dorothy Nevas and
Bernice Braun. Also placed on the
list are Sue Cleminson, Linda Reck
and Marjorie Barber.
Mary Rupp, Sue Doherty, Ann

McDonald, Donna Somers and
Alice Basford will also act as
"friends."
Concluding the list of coeds par-
ticipating in this program are Ruth
Haywood, Gayle Lankard, Linda
Balling, Chris Eckert and Nadya
Spassenko.
Sometime during the summer,
coeds selected by the League to
participate in the program will be
given the name and address of one
foreign student who is enrolling
in the University
Coeds To Write Students
American coeds, after obtaining
the name and address, will write
a letter to the foreign student wel-
coming her to Ann Arbor. The Am-
erican coed will also explain who
she is and will offer any needed
help or information.
During the fall semester, the
University coed will keep in direct
contact with her foreign friend.
The coed will help her friend when
she goes shopping. She will also
include her in the activities which
she has with other American stu-
dents.
This program is under the di-
rection of the International Com-
mittee of the League. The mem-
bers of the committee include
Mary Slawson, chairman, Judy
Jennis; Nancy MacDonald; Ursula
Geberd; Elaine Borkowski; Jean
Scruggs, Assembly representative;
and Andrea Snyder, Panhellenic
representative.

OUR PAINTED

COTTON
BLOUSES
are jeweled
collectors
items
3.50
Conversation-
provoking,

o ":
"'
ti )
.r
D l 0,
ZA'4/$°k o
a ,
j.+ev"""' Cfr/i,-

l

- -. ---- ---- -. .--. . . . ..

1.....J .u..uA. Ju'C :L . S. .............~...........79' ... .4. u.... _ .....u+°._ .. ....... J...S':u i:4

tititi
:"."}
.}\
:#
>."±f
; :!
:':
ti
.
''.M
1.
T{
'M1i .
ti
ti
C+;i
.'t:Y
;.;:;i

get

SANDAL WISE

with~

SANDIER

These cute little
styles are just right
for the vacation
days ahead --
a. THE WHISPER
Soft, glove leather in
Beige - Gray - Black. To
size 10.
(Both Styles-$8.95),

r:.
.G:",
:,:
F:::
2+'
jS;: a
2;:{
":"
k "%
"':'
%:
p i
3:
Sy
ti;
{ }:
s,'{:;
is
C}i
r'r>'
:^:
: :
:"J:
Z :
'il
;:§
t;:;
r. f:

1I

ff
I' Qf
To- Yf I
x SS + , .

cool sleeveless
blouses . .i.

gaily printed with
colorful scenes

and motifs.

[k

THE EYELASH

r a .
f '. "
// ;
a-,.

Top: "Treasure Ches

Quick as a wink,
and the pattern is
extraordinary too-
Handsewn moccasin
with a springy
cork wedge to
bounce on.
In WHITE or BLACK
To size 9. in narrow

Center "Pink
Elephants."
Bottom: "Cafe de ta Rue."
White, black, pink
or maize.
Sizes 10 to 16.

I

- * 7'L * 1 , A

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan