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February 12, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-12

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PAGE TWO

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1955

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1955

VISITING PROFESSOR:
Edgerton Views Soviet Literary Scene
0~

Wingo Sees
School Role

: =
- <
t

By HARxLY STRAUSS
Socialist-realism is the official
standard by whicn the values of
Soviet literature are measured to-
day, according to William B. Edg-
erton, visiting professor of Slavic
languages and literature.
On leave during this school year
from Pennsylvania State Universi-
ty, Prof. Edgerton is teaching both
Russian language and literature
here.
Increased Nationalism
Russian novels today are marked
by gretter nationalism, he said,
and they are more puritanical and
conservative. He observed family
life plays a larger part in literary
works than formerly and there is
a reduction of sexual freedom.
"Omissions and revisions of ear-
lier classics is being done today,"
Prof. Edgerton continued, "with
certain topics eliminated altogeth-
er. Most of the works tampered
with are those dating after the
revolution but a few rare instances
have been found where works of
the last century were edited."
In many cases, he ioted, the au-
thors themselves do the changing.
References to the United States
and other parts of the West are
usually dropped, as well as any-
thing critical of Mother Russia.
All changes are made, Prof. Edg-
erton added, with a definite idea
in mind not merely randomly,
Writings Today
Russian literature since 1946 has
been static because of a general
tightening-up of the political line,
he stated, resulting in more rigid
works.
"While the interesting modern
literary period is the twenties,
some later writers are read even
now for their works are interesting
in spite of rather than because of
the conditions," he remarked.
Reports about the writers' con-
gress teat met late in 1954 are now
appearing ,he continued, and they
show somewhat the dissatisfaction
on the part of the writers since
increased government control has
made "boredom prevalent in to-
day's Russian novels."
This, he said, seems to lead the
Russian reader to prefer the old
classics, especially Russian works,
rather than more modern ones.
The non-artistic concerns on
Russian literature today Prof.
Edgerton likened somewhat to
United States commercial restric-
tions in television plays and slick
magazine stories, though "of

New Social
Must Begin

Services
in Future

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
PROF. WILLIAM B. EDGERTON
". .. today's Russian literature is static"

course, the Russian limitations are
political rather than commercial
and far more rigid."
Russian Master
How would he explain the many
great literary figures of Russian
literature?
"I venture to say that all coun-
tries have geniuses that never de-
velop--who knows how many nev-
er get the chance because of fami-
ly or poverty or prejudice?
"In the society before the revo-
lution, energy was concentrated on
literature which might under dif-
ferent circumstances have been
scattered in other fields."
Last semester Prof. Edgerton's
classes included one on Turgenev
and this semester cne on Dostoiev-
sky in addition tb the survey of

Russian Literature in English
translation class.
Prof. Edgerton was teaching
both French and Spanish before he
became interested in Russian. He'
once taught English on an assist-
antship in France's Lycee de Bel-
forte. During World War II he did
relief work in Germany and Po-
land where he learned some of the
Slavic languages.
Following the war "I found I
couldn't resist Russian anymore
and took my P..D 4n it at Columbia
and then went on to Penn State
which was expanding their Rus-
sian division."
In Ann Arbor with his wife and
15-year-old daughter and 11-year-
old son, Prof. Edgerton will return
to Penn State in June.

ISA Helps Foreign Student
Adjustment to Campus Life
. .

. By MARGE PIERCY
The school of the future will
have to take on neglected social
sarvices or lose its important role
to some new institution, according
to Prof. G. Max Wingo of the
School of Education.
Discussing controversial prob-
lems largely by-passed by existing
institutions, Prof. Wingo listed
four questions as examples of is-
sues schools will have to deal with
in the near future:
1. Who is going to give instruc-
tion in the physiological, emotional
and ethical aspects of sex beha-
vior?
2. Who is going to take syste-
matic responsibility for maintain-
ing the health of the younger
generation?
3. Who is going to be respon-
sible for systematic religious in-
struction?
4. Who is going to help chil-
dren develop worthwhile avoca-
tional interests and skills?
Resisted Every Effort
In the last generation, the
school has resisted almost every
effort to increase its responsibili-
ties, Prof. .Tingo charged. "It
balked at feeding children at noon,
at driver's training and at offer-
ing recreational programs. As-
sumption of these responsibilities
was forced on schools by a great
groundswell of social necessity."
It's a matter of evolution, Prof.
Wingo remarked, that if the school
fails to respond to social needs
some other now unknown institu-
tion would develop. This institu-
tion, he predicted, would be pub-
licly supported, as the Civilian
Conservation Corps were during
the Depression.
Give Vocational Skills
"It would aim at giving young
persons certain kinds of vocational
skills and the opportunity to do
useful work, as well as furnishing
recreational facilities, at present
served by the corner drugstore and
roadhouse. The school in this case
might well find itself a minor in-
stitution, competing for public
funds," he continued.
tainous Monroe McIntyre, Maneu-
vering Mayer Moulthrop, Prissy
Pitts Pyrros, Sterling Stewart
Scott, Sideburned Stanwyck Seltz,
Tantalizing Taylor Thomet, Wob-
bling Wilson Webb, Windy Welles
Weinberger.
Mimes Elect
lN ew Members
In the morning, in the night,
Sons of Thespis show their might,
With chimes of Mimes,
They came a tapping,
Broke down the doors
With noisy rapping.
In their quest for tragedy and
mirth,
Selected those who showed their
worth.
Enacted a drama in two parts
In honor of the actor's art.
The play is cast,
The curtain falls,
The chosen few have heard their
call!
Mimes have spoken!
Thus Thespis looked with favor
upon:
Buxom Bankhead Bahor, Bud-
ding Barrymore Boasberg, Bounc-
ing Boswell Booth, Brawling
Brando Bradfield, Cunning Car-
son Christiansen, Cantankerous
Clooney Coates, Carnivorous Cor-
bett Cobb, Corny Como Cooke,
Cuddly Cornell Cohodes, Caroling
Cooper Cotton, Frivolous Fields
Frymer, Galloping Garrick Gil-
low, Groaning Grable Gordon,
Lugubrious L i b e r a c e Lerman,

Lovable Llewellyn Lewy, Moun-

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3,23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified leadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Red Wallet at Yost Field House
Monday afternoon. $5 reward if wallet
is returned with money. Ext. 230,
NO 2-5553. )66A
LOST--One D.U. pin over J-Hop week-
end. Call 306 Mosher. )67Aj
LOST - Maroon wallet containing
month's allowance Feb. 8. Must leave
school if not returned. Generous re-
ward. Call Robert Burns, NO 2-2790.
)69A
LOST-Gold pin (preceding in caps)
"Place Vendome" reward. Phone NO
3-2613. )68A
LOST - Green Parker pen. Initials
L.L.C. 5060 Alice Lloyd. )70A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,'
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B'
TUXEDO, size 40-42, excellent condi-
tion. Also 3 dress shirts, 16-33, 2--
151%-34. NO 3-3821. )215B
1950 CHEVROLET-Deluxe Club Coupe
privately owned, two-tone grey. Ex-
cellent upholstery, exterior, mechan-
ical condition. Radio and heater, good
tires, '55 license, $495 cash. NO 2-8644.
)228B
KLIPSCHORN. Perfect condition. Call
NO 2-1291, after six. )229B
1946 FORD-Radio, heater, $150. 1947.
Buick sedan, radio and heater, $150.
Fitzgerald-Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit
St. NO 8-8141. )232B
ENGLISH RACER, hardly used. $35.
Call W. Bucci at NO 3-8684 after 6.
)240B
1951 FORD VICTORIA. Two-tone green.
Radio and heater. Overdrive. 30,000
miles. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )235B

FOR SALE
1946 CHEVROLET. 30,000 actual miles,
radio and heater. Two-tone blue, a
beautiful car. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)238B
1949 JEEP Station Wagon. Six cylinder
with overdrive. Radio and heater.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )239B
FOR SALE Royal portable, elite type.
Call Patricia Cooper evenings, NO
3-1511, Ext. 544. )225B
1946 FORD four-door; radio, heater,
a very nice car. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)244B
1948 DODGE two-door green, radio,
heater, new tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )245B
FOR THE FINEST hi-fidelity music,
hear the new Telefunken; Opus AM,
FM radio. Truly the Cadillac of
radios. Ann Arbor Radio and TV,
1217 S. University, Ph. NO 8-7942, 112
blocks east of East Eng. 243B
SKI BOOTS, 8D, $8; Women's ski suit
size 34, $25. Women's English Bike,
All gadgets, New in Sept., $45. Call
NO 2-5955. )246B
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. Student rooms.
)23D
DOUBLE ROOM, modern furnishings
near campus. 1111'White, NO 2-9625.
)39D
STUDENT ROOM, men, on campus.
Double at $6.50 each. Single $9. NO
8-9402 or NO 8-6087. )43D
GOOD LOCATION-Two room suite for
two girls. Students, nurses. Quiet
redecorated house with aparatments
and rooms. Coffee making, guest priv-
ileges. $7 per girl. Phone NO 8-7486.
)47D
MODERN 5-room apartment conven-
iently located near campus. Two
male.students desiring a third to
share. NO 3-8607. )49D
NEAR CAMPUS and with or without
kitchen. Double and single rooms.
Call evenings, NO 3-3003. )48D

ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Any arrange-
ment of meals. Breakfast 30 cents,
lunch 60 cents, dinner $1.20. Call NO
3-5806. )9E
REASONABLE BOARD at a professional
fraternity. Good food. Call House
Manager at NO 2-8312. )11E
BOARDERS WANTED. Good food, Rea-
sonable rates. For information call
NO 8-8400. )l1E
17 MEN renting large house. Want one
more. Large attractive room. Eating
facilities available. $100 a semester.
927 S. Forest. NO 8-8400. )12E
PERSONAL
STUDENTS-begin or continue your
piano playing while at college. Artist
teachers-practice facilities. Robert
Dumm Piano Studios, call NO 2-3541.
)54F
J-HOP PICTURES on sale at Adminis-
tration Bldg. Sat. 9-12, Mon. 9-5.
After 5 call Bob Lorey at NO 2-6436.
)59F
OPEN ARE WE, AUJOURD'HUI. Stu-
dent Periodical, NO 2-3061. )58F
HELP WANTED
WANT SALESMEN for Michigan. Jacket
emblems. Nord, Box 92, Forest Hills,
N.Y. )30H
WANTED-Enterprising young man to
operate sales agency for our na-
tionally advertised collegiate neck-
wear. Styling, sales aids and value
enable our distributors to earn over
$50.00 a week on campuses through-
out the country. Write 153 Grand
Avenue, Rockville Centre, N.Y. )33H
WE HAVE a few openings for women
21 to 45 who would like to earn extra
dollars evenings. Earnings are un-
limited, work is pleasant. Write Mrs.
Dean, 702 E. Ganson, Jackson, Mich-
igan. )32H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
sox washed also, )81
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
BABY OR SMALL CHILD for day care
in licensed home. NO 3-5830. 231

Daily

CI,

assifieds

Bring
Quick
Results

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING WANTED-reasonable rates.
Mrs. Muliet, 726 S. Main NO 8-6883.
)22I
TYPING--Thesis, term papers, etc. Rea-
sonable - rates, prompt service, 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )251
WANTED TO BUY
BACH CORONET, used First Line In-
strument. Call Collect Royal Oak,
Lincoln 2-4135. )2228
ALTERATIONS
DRESSMAKING, ALTERATIONS, HEMS.
Prompt service, Call NO 3-0783. )4N
ALTERATIONS. LADIES' GARMENTS.
Prompt Service. Call NO 2-2678 Alpha
Graves. 241
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALTY
NO 2-7787
for 2-3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

WUERTH
NOW SHOWING
Shudder and Like It!

"We try to aid the foreign stu-
dent in everypossible way, and
promote better relations with
Americans."
Placing equal stress on both
parts of his statement, Turker
Karamizrak, '55E, president of the
International Students Associa-
tion, outlined the major purpose
of the organization. Established
over a decade ago, ISA is a student
operated and strictly non-profit
organization which does a great
deal to aid the visiting student in
his adjustment to life on a Mid-
Western campus.
The ISA's governmental system
is simple and effective. A House of
Representatives comprised of stu-
dents from the various countries
elects : President and Vice-presi-
dent. These officials then appoint
other officers with the approval of
the House. At the present time stu-
dents from China, Turkey, Leba-
non and England are among the
ISA execu, ive officers.
New Orientation Program
Personal relations between ISA
and the new foreign student are
begun even before he reaches cam-
pus. Informative, helpful letters
CC Upholds Mayor
On Tag Day Issue
Mayor William E. Brown's refu-
sal to support additional tag day
sales was supported today by the
Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce
Board of Directors.
A request by Alpha Phi to hold
a Valentine Day tag sale for
American Heart Association had
been previously denied by Mayor
Brown.

are sent to prospective students,
and many times a irrember of ISA
will be at the train or bus station
to meet them.
Actual orientation poses a diffi-
cult problem. "TI- e foreign stu-
dent's problems are often more
unique and difficult than those
encountered by Americans," Kar-
amizrak explained. "Last year an
official orientation program was
initiated and through lack of ex-
perience it was rather ineffectual."
However, this year's orientations
program was more successful.
Karamizrak expressed hope that
the University would assist in the
planning and organization of the
ISA programs in the future.
Housing Problem
One major difficulty faced by
ISA is the housing of all foreign
students. Once receiving a list of
prospective addresses from the
University sponsored, Internation-
al Center, representatives of ISA
take the students around and
make sure that they are able to
secure suitable lodgings.
Asked if students were faced
with segregational problems Kar-
amizrak stated, "The statement
that there is no roor available is
taken at face value by foreign
students."
"At the present time we are also
publishing a monthly news bulle-
tin and attempting to secure a
University grant fund f r-foreign
students," Karamizrak added.
Neuberger To Address
ADA Roosevelt Dinner
Sen. Richard Neuberger (D-
Ore.) and cartoonist Herb Block
will address a Roosevelt Dinner
sponsored by the Detroit Ameri-
cans for Democratic Action at
7:30 p.m. today in the Latin Quar-
ter, Detroit.

TODAY

Doors Open 12:45
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

Matinees 50c
Eves.-Sun. 80c

OGES

. ''

...,

-1

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
a professional arena theatre invites you to
"THE COCKTAIL PARTY"
by T. S. ELIOT
Thursday thru Sunday 8:15 P.M. until Feb. 20th
Matinee Feb. 20th, 2:30 P.M.
STUDENT RATE 99c
General Admission $1.65

I

Revervations NO 2-5915

Masonic Temple, 327 S. Fourth

cinema L duild
The J. Arthur Rank Mystery
"SO LONG
AT THE FAIR"

I

Today and
Sunday

ORPHEUM

1:30 P.M.
65c

"EXCELLENT! BOLDLY ENTERTAINING" -N.Y. Post
If the one about the
birds and the bees bores you
if irate fathers
don't scare you- ,

.~rn

~UUU~3U3U3

I

I

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