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May 18, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-18

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 18, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 18, 1955 U, a urn ,uvwu~U,
THE MICHIGAN b4fl.V

rA (.ii E THREE

G

Five

M' Pitchers

Work in

Three-Hit

Shutout

Win

Three U-D Errors, 10 Hits
Help in WolverineVictory

Wallingford Michigan's Two-Mile
Title Threat in Coming Big Ten Meet

(Continued from Page 1)

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
DON POLOSKEY, a sophomore right-hander who has turned in
some surprisingly good performances for Michigan this season,
pitches to starting catcher Gene Snider. Poloskey pitched the
first three innings, giving up no hits, in Michigan's 9-0 win over
Detroit yesterday.
Lambda Chi Alpha, SAE
Triumph in I-M Softball

ning catch of the ball with his
back to home plate, but had no
chance for a play of Benedict.
Poor Baserunning
Michigan scored one in the sev-
enth on singles by Thurston, Fox
and Cline, and then in the eighth
scored one more, unearned. Ken
Tippery and Howie Tommelein
reach third and second respective-
ly when Ursine made two wild
throws.
Poor baserunnihg broke up a
possible big rally, when Jim Vu-
kovich hit a sharp grounder to-
ward short. Tommelein was out,
as he was caught off second base,
and then when Tippery tried to
score, he too was cut down. Gene
Snider then walked, to bring up
pitcher Fagge, whose single scored
Vukovich from second.
Michigan wound up its scoring
in the ninth inning, on Fox's sin-
gle, sandwiched between Bene-
dict's and Eaddy's walks, and two
wild pitches by Titan pitcher, Tom
Hackstadt.
An oddity occurred after the
eighth, when the fans in the ball
park, and the entire Detroit team,
thinking the game over, left the
field. A hurried call by the um-
pires, brought the players back,
and the game was concluded be-
fore almost empty stands.
There was one significant
change in the Wolverine lineup
for yesterday's game. Utility in-
fielder Frank Ronan filled in for
the weak hitting Vukovich at first
base for the first seven innings.

Fox Runs
DETROIT AB J
Finn, 3b........... 4
Urnini, 2b....... 3
Knittel, ss.........4
McLaughlin, c..2
Sparrow, lb........ 4
Baumgart, if ...... 2
Sullivan, of .........3
Schram, rf.........4
Ursin, p............1
Jungworth, p .......2
Hackstedt, p........ 1
Shook*.............1
Totals ...........31
*batted for Jungworth in

Wild
R H
0 a
0 1
0 1
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o 0
0 0)
0 {)
0 3
seventh

He did not get a hit in his one
official time at bat, but did score
one Michigan run.
For Michigan, it was the last
non-conference tilt of the year.
The Wolverines meet Indiana and
Ohio State this weekend.

By MARILYN HIGGINS
He may be diminutive but any-
one who has seen him run will
agree that Ron Wallingford is a
powerhouse.
Michigan's top two miler, a jun-
ior from Ottawa, Ontario, major-
ing in zoology, has run in some
grueling competition in the past
but says that the competition the
rest of this year and next year
will be just as great if not greater.
Jim Lambert, of Indiana, and Karl
Jonsson, of Illinois, will be threats
in the Big Ten Outdoor Conference
meet.
Wallingford hopes to continue
his winning streak in the outdoes'
title meet. He placed first in the

E
0
2
4)
0
0
0
4
0
3

7
Sw
t

Big Ten Indoor Meet at East Lan-
sing with the time of 9:26.4. He
says that this is the biggest thrill
he has had since entering Big Ten
competition.

In the Ohio Relays Wallingford;
ran the one-and-a-half mile to!
lose to Harry Kennedy, of Michi-
gan State. Sixth was the best that
he could do in the tough Drake Re-
lays. In a triangular meet between
Michigan, Navy, and Penn State,
Wallingford palced first with Gar-
rett, of Penn State, coming in sec-
cond. At the Big Ten Relays he
took second in the one-and-one-
half mile run.
England is the destination for
Wallingofrd this summer as he
hopes to prepare for the 1956

Olympics by competing with some
of the best middle distance run-
ners in the world.
High School Star
When asked how he became in-
terested in track, Wallingford
said that it started by accident.
While in high school he had the
choice of joining the football team
or the track team. He chose the
former.
One day the track coach asked
him if he would like to run two
miles in a cross country meet. He
accepted and without any practice
won the event, much to his sur-
prise. He says that his winning was
due to his football conditioning.
After that he decided that track
would be his sport.

RON WALLINGFORD
... indoor champ

Ti tan Neters Challenge
TT- - -Y , A " * 41 T

By AL KONOP
It took over t wo hours but
Lambda Chi Alpha finally reached
the finals in the IM first place
playoffs, yesterday.
Lambda Chi's 12-8 win from
Delta Tau Delta gives them a berth
in the finals against Sigma Alpha
Epsilon, the other semi-final win-
ner.
At the outset it looked as ifI
Lambda Chi was in for an easy
day's work. Paced by the heavy
stick work of Jim Pickard, Lamb-
da Chi built up a five run lead
in the first three innings.
Delts Rally
However, Delta Tau Delta's most
fruitful inning was yet to come.
In the bottom of the third, the
Delts pushed across six runs to
take the lead.
Lambda Chi came right back in
the next frame with two runs on
Jim Dutcher's bases loaded single.
Another Delt rally knotted the
count in the bottom half of the,
same inning.
Don Maybee's booming bat final-
ly settled things in the last inning
as his two run homer sparked
Lambda Chi's decisive four run
uprising.
Extra Innings
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fought its I

way to the first place finals with a
close 12-10 decision over Phi Delta
Theta.
The Phi Delt's Bill MacFarland
forced the game into extra innings
with a run scoring single in the
sixth frame.
In the second extra inning Paul
Brown gave Sigma Alpha Epsilon
its win with-- a powerful clutch
double that scored the winning
run.
It was nip and tuck all the way
as Beta Theta edged Phi Sigma
Grid Ducats
Beginning June 1st, students
may place orders for all home
and away football tickets at
the athletic ticket office. This
does not pertain to the regular
student tickets which will be
issued in the fall.
Delta 6-4 in a second place play-
off game.
In other IM contests, Pi Lambda
Phi drubbed Delta Sigma Phi 14-1,
Trigon took an extra inning game
from Tau Delta Phi, 7-6, while
Chi Psi defeated Alpha Tau Ome-
ga, 8-1.

IHIA AB R H E L I/
BeneditFssr.......3e3 2f 4o ' I1U fr td IV ic,
Fox, cf.... ......... 5 1 4 0)
Cline, rf ...........4 0 1 0
Eaddy, 3b..........4 0)04 0 1 By HAP ATHERTON
Tippery, 2b.....4 04 0 0){4)
Tommelein, if ..... 4 0 0 o This is the lull before the storm.-
Ronan, lb......... 1 1 0 0 The Wolverine tennis squad, aft-
Vukovich, lb....... 2 1 0 0 er smashing Michigan State Mon-
S niderski, ......... 3 1 1 0 day aftern oon 9-0, for its six teen th !
Polosky, p.......... 1 0 0) 1 consecutive victory, should make.
Thurston, p........ 2 1 1 o short work of its battle with the
Fagge, p1........... 0 1 0 University of Detroit in Ann Ar-
Peterjohn, p ...,.. 0 0 0 0 bor today at 2 p.m.j
Clark, p. . 0 0-0"" The storm comes on Friday aft-;
Totals ...........34 9 10 1 ernoon when Michigan takes on
Indiana's great team at Blooming-,
Detroit .......... 000 000 000-0 3 3 ton. The Hoosiers, holding on toI
MICHIGAN......100 030 113-9 10 1 the Big Ten crown for the lasti
three years, have been the squadi
that Michigan's been pointing for.,
Brothers
The Titans' Head Coach Ches-
ter Murphy, brother of Michigan's
own Head Coach Bill Murphy, has
been faced with a rather serious
situation thus f ar this season. His I
T itle A teet !team lacks depth in all but the,
number one singles slot. He canI
;boast of only three returning let- I
termen, one of whom played regu-
season has been John Schubeck, lar, last season.1
who has averaged in the mid-sev- Earl Clark, number one man and
enties. On occasion, however, his captain for Detroit, carries thel
performance has fallen short of ex- brunt of its attack. The other re-i
pectations. In the short time that turning lettermen for Detroit areZ
remains, his main efforts will be Sandy Kaplan, and Tom Geiger.i
directed toward ferreting out the It was Kaplan who spoiled a per-c

higan Here
fect whitewash for Michigan last
year when he took the first set,
6-3, but his opponent, Bob Sas-
sone, grabbed the next two, 6-1,
6-0. Geiger lost both his sets in
the same meet to Bob Moore, 7-5,
6-4.
Coach Bill Murphy will be rest-
ing up two of his starters in prep-
aration for the Hoosier tilt. Mark
Jaffe and Dick Potter will relin-
quish their singles positions to Bob
Nederlander in second slot and Bob
Mitchell in third. Dick Cohen will
take over Nederlander's vacant
fourth position.
Barry MacKay, winner of 10
consecutive matches since he
started varsity competition at the
beginning of the season, will start
in his usual number one spot. In
the other singles matches, Al Mann
will start in fifth spot, and Pete
Paulus will, see action in sixth
place.
Despite the switch in the singles
lineup, Coach Murphy plans to
start his regular doubles teams.
MacKay and Potter will team-up
in the number one match, with
Mann and Nederlander following,
in second, and Jaffe and Paley will
combine in third slot.

NINE DAYS LEFT:
Golf Team i
For Big Ten
By JUDIE CANTORI
The heat's on as the Big Ten
golf teams prime for the annual
Western Conference meet nine
days hence.
Although still crying over its
past four defeats, the Maize and
Blue links squad is practicing with
vengeance. With only twelve days
left, the team is hitting mighty
hard to iron out all the kinks in
its play.
The steadiest Wolverine this

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air.condit fl etrain coaches .
mony and visit.
S ithd' ots of space o roO' vacatiafl.
AA ,homefor summer
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Al arfriends.
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room fr weather ugh dr ieqng§
Or heaps nht do
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rognd-terCon "Yo and twag e
hom es p co h f r s ve 2 5 etravel,
FA * Or by u most osngG trips o r t>
h't ,gther 2 ROUP C 00
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soe each esaeme in same eadn
epo e e28%, eye edirectinas enifyu n S9
Wa*pt o oca tretur
"Nsos * ew York.
'.+... Lancaster, pt ,
EASTERN RAIROADS r y
By appointment purveyors of soap to the late King George VI, Yardley & Co., Ltd. London

THESE GUYS ARE 'BUMS'?
Brooks Startle Baseball World with Fast Start

By ED SALEM
"Dem Bums" have the whole
baseball world talking.
Certainly no one could have pre-
dicted that the Brooklyn Dodgers,
a team with virtually the same
starting lineup as last season, when
they finished a poor second, would
get off to such a fast start in the
National League pennant race this
year.
Yet the prides of Brooklyn, in
compiling winning streaks of first
10 and then 11 straight ball games,
have broken many modern major
league records for early season
.rplay.
Improved Pitching
The greatest single factor which
can account for the Dodgers 26-6
record thus far, is their revitalized
pitching staff. The Dodger huilers,
under the tutelage of pitching
coach Joe Becker, have finally liv-
ed up to the potential which Man-
ager Walt Alston always predicted
was there.
Leading the mound corps once
again is reliable Carl Erskine. Ers-
kine, an 18 game winner last sea-
son, has won five games for the
Brooks without a loss, and cur-
rently is leading the National Lea-
gue with an earned run average
of 1.33 per game.
1a~

Not far behind him are burly1
Don Newcombe, Billy Loes, and
lefty-Johnny Podres. Newcombe
has finally lived up to his pre-1
army form, with a record of 5-0.
The unpredictable Loes seems to
have "found himself" at last, and
along with Podres, a curve ball
artist who has fully recovered from
his apendectomy operation of last
year, gives the Dodgers four frontt
line starters.
Backing these men up, and thus
giving the Dodgers some of the
best pitching depth in the major
leagues, are spot-pitcher Russ
Meyer, and reliefers Jim Hughes,
Ed Roebuck, Clem Labine, and
Joe Black.
Dodger Power
The Dodger batting, always a
source of terror for opposing pitch-j
ers, has been better than ever thisE
year.
Catcher Roy Campanella, whose
average hovered around the .200
mark last season, is leading the!
team with .356. Duke Snider and
SandyAmoros are also above the
.300 mark. Furthermore, Snider is,
leading the league in runs scored
with 31, runs-batted-in with 34,
and home runs with 11.
Dodger power is evident in that
Snider, Campanella, and Carl Fur-

cause.
Second to Schubeck is Co-Cap-
tain Bob McMasters. While his av-
erage has also been somewhere in
the seventies he has fluctuated
constantly, and is trying to steady
his game before the big meet.
Low Man I
Hopes ride high on Henry Loeb,
who showed a great deal of im-
provement as the season pro-
gressed. Loeb's only appearance on
the fairways in the early weeks
was during the southern jaunt.
Then, in a match with MSC. he
was the only man on either team;
to break 80 on the first round,
carding a 77.
Skip MacMichael, Ken Meyers,
and Fred Micklow, although shoot-
ing fairly low, still left lots of
room for improvement as the
scores were posted of the team's
most recent match, a triangular
against Purdue and Ohio State.

i

W L
Cleveland ..20 10
Chicago ....18 10
New York ..18 11
Detroit......16 15
Boston .....15 18
Kansas City 12 18
Washington .11 18
Baltimore ..10 20

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Pet.
.667
.643
.621
.516
.455
.400
.379
.333

GB
1
11,4
41/:,
61
8
8%
10

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Brooklyn ...25 6 -.806
Milwaukee ..17 14 .548
New York ...15 14 .518
St. Louis ... .14 13 .518
Chicago ....16 15 .516
Cincinnati .11 18 .3791
Pittsburgh . .11 19 .366
Philadelphia 9 19 .321

Major League Standings

8
9
.9
9
13
13%
142

illo have knocked in 94 runs be-
tween them. Furillo, known more
for his accurate arm than for
hitting although he won the league
batting title two years ago, has hit
in 29 runs himself and slammed
10 homers.
Although veterans Jackie Rob-
inson and PeeWee Reese appear to
have slowed down considerably
this year, they have been ably re-
placed in a number of games by
Don Hoak and Don Zimmer.
The Dodgers may not continue
their hot pace, but after finishing
in the first division every year
since 1946, losing the pennant
twice in playoff games, and once
on the last day of the season, they
are well aware that every game
they win now means one less need-
ed in September.
IN A HURRY.
Stop in for a
"sip-.f"
Quick haircut in our
"cutting corner"
-----AIR-CONDITIONED--.--
The Baseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 1, Washington 0
Baltimore 3, Detroit 2
Boston 10, Cleveland 3
New York 1, Chicago 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Baltimore
Kansas City at Washington
Chicago at New York
Cleveland at Boston

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 3, Brooklyn 0
Cincinnati 9, Pittsburgh 2
Philadelphia at Chicago, cold
Milwaukee 9, New York 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Chicago, 2
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
New York at Milwaukee (N)
Brooklyn at St. Louis (N)

; ,.
it
r
"-
i
,,Al
,,
r

r a ,
.r -
When the first
gasoline buggy began to chug.
Budweiser
led all beers in
sales. And,...

-
k

^
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-..,
==.
, .....
,
..1
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4..."+
.
a

Don't you forget
to buy the
1955 'ENSION
Less Than Two Weeks
Remain
Come to the
Student Publications Bldg.
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The way to arrive at this happy state, gentlemen, is to use
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a cooling, masculine body powder-conceived in England
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A NH E U SER - BU SC H,I N C,
ST. LOUIS - NEWARK - LOS ANGELES

p rr mr A

.............

6

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