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May 15, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-15

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SUNDAY, MAY 15, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Blues Whip Whites in Spring GridPractice

Finale

C«>

Barr, Pace, Maddock Star
In Intrasquad Scrimmage

'

By TOM BEIERLE

JIM VANPELT, JR.
... most improved gridder

Award Goes
VanPelt
Jim VanPelt, Jr., of Evanston,
Ill., rugged freshman quarterback,
was named winner yesterday of
the Meyer W. Morton Trophy, pre-
sented annually to the most im-
proved player in spring practice.
The award was announced by
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan as the
Wolverines concluded their an-
nual spring drills with a game
scrimmage in the Michigan Sta-
dium.
Commenting on the selection
which wai made by the Wolverine
staff, Oosterbaan said, "VanPelt's
improvement has been outstand-
ing and his attitude is excellent.
If he continues to develop as stead-
ily next fall his contribution to
the team should be most outstand-
ing."
VanPelt is the 30th athlete to
receive the award since it was es-
tablished in 1925 and succeeds Ron
Kramer, the award winner last
year.

A tremendous offensive effort
yesterday gave the Blue team a 31-
7 victory over the White team in
the Michigan Stadium.
The two and a half hour intra-
squad scrimmage, witnessed by
nearly 5,000 fans, marked the clos-
ing of the spring football practice,
sessions.
Leading the attack for the Blue
team were left halfbacks Terry
Barr and Jim Pace and quarter-
back Jim Maddock. Pace and Barr
had a touchdown apiece, and be-
tween them accounted for most
of the Blue ground yardage.
Maddock's passing arm saw a
lot of action in the second half
and in the extra fifth quarter as
he connected with Larry Faul on
two long ones and on several short
tosses. His option play around left
end proved to be the bread and
butter play of the day as it was
good for sizeable gains four times
and also the final touchdown.
Rotunno Scores
Mike Rotunno, playing fullback
after his switch from end this
spring opened up the scoring for
the Blue as he took the ball the
last six inches to paydirt. Barr and
Maddock had moved the ball from
the Blue 43 yard line in a series
of seven plays.
Mike Shatusky, Jim VanPelt and
Jim Byers then took over for the
Whites but couldn't do a thing
against the strong Blue defenses.
Rotunno and Barr teamed up
again in the next quarter as the
Blue this time rolled 60 yards to
their second touchdown. Rotunno
hit the middle for five yards twice.
and Barr moved the ball the rest
of the way to score his only
touchdown of the day.
New Teams
After this, Coach Bennie Oos-
terbaan put in new teams for both
squads, but the White team fared
no better.

The Blues scored the second
time they. got the ball after the
team switch. Jim Pace did most of
the work in moving the ball in
from the 25 yard line to score.
It took only five more plays for
the Blue to score again. White's
Jack Lousma's pass was intercept-
ed by Bill MacPhee and two plays
later George Corey scored from 24
yards out on a run around left
end.
John Greenwood, who took a
back seat to Maddock last year,
took as Blue signal-caller and
reached paydirt after Larry Faul
blocked a White kick.
The White team finally came to
life in the final period and stopped
a 'Blue scoring thrust. Fullback
Mike Basford led the 40-yard drive
to paydirt.
In the final scoring play of the
day, Jim Maddock kept the ball
on an option play and went 24
yards for his touichdown.
Actually, the scoring does not
tell the whole story. Jim VanPelt,
Mike Shatusky, and Jim Byers
Soccer Loss
Michigan State kicked in
four second half goals to defeat
Michigan's previously unbeaten
soccer team here, 7-3, yester-
day.
Art Southan scored four
goals for State while Michigan's
scoring was done by Kuo-Chiew
Quan and Chan Tha.
all shone on both offense and de-
fense for the White. Byers re-
ceived a healthy round of applause
when he left the field.
Ed Shannon turned in a very
steady performance as he played
both fullback and the familiar
right halfback positions and kept
hacking out four and five yard
gains.

Tracksters
'Run Away'
ith Relays
(Continued from Page 1)
Michigan State, Minnesota, and
Iowa each captured one relay ti-
tle. The Spartans won the 880 yard
relay in 1:26.7, only a tenth sec-
ond off the best Big Ten mark.
Minnesota tied the relay record
in the 440 sprint relay, with a time
of :41.8.
The Hawkeyes took the final re-
lay event of the meet with a vic-
tory in the distance medley. The
Wolverines finished second in this
event.
Kramer Shows
Big Ron Kramer made a great
showing for himself as he showed
in three events. He teamed up with
Ken Bottoms in the discus event
to push the Wolverines to a sec-
ond place in this event. In the
shot put,the combination of Kra-
mer and Dave Owens produced a
second place and in the weight
men's dash, Kramer came in third.
In the 220 low hurdles, Jim Love,
current Big Ten indoors low hur-
dles champ, garnered a third. Ron
Wallingford took a second in the
1%/ mile run and in the high jump,
the combined efforts of Stan Men-
ees and MA k Booth produced a
third place.

TOM HENDRICKS
... wins broad jump

--Daily--Dick Gaskill
JIM PACE OVERCOMES AN OBSTACLE IN SCORING FOR
THE BLUES
'M' Netters-hitewash
h S
Ohio Sate in .u-al eet

'Boxing Champ
Defends Title
SAN FRANCISCO (A"- - Rocky
Marciano is supposed to demolish
Don Cockell, a broad-beamed Brit-
ish hog farmer, in the fifth defense
of his world heavyweight title
Monday night at Kezar Stadium.
The sturdy champ from Brock-
ton, Mass., unbeaten in his 47-
fight career with 41 knockouts, is
such a topheavy favorite that
there is practically no betting on
the result. Even the promoters' re-I
lease mentions a 5 to 1 price. They
say it's about 8 to 5 that Cockell
won't last five rounds.

Wolverine
Marksman:
Wins Honor
Jan Gogulski of Michigan's
Western Conference championship
team recently gained a berth on
the National Rifle Association's
All-American second team.
Gogulski was informed of the
honor in a letter from Merritt A.
Edson, Executive Director of the
NRA. Membership on the team is
awarded to those men who rank
highest among the country's col-
legiate riflemen.
An Engineering School junior,
Gogulski has compiled an out-
standing shooting record in the
past five years. Competing in about
50 matches during that time, he
has won over 200 medals and var-
ious trophies.
Gogulski's accomplishments in
his team's meets this year were
instrumental in Michigan's gain-
ing the NRA's sectional champion-
ship for this area.
MAJOR LEAGUE SCORES
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Brooklyn 13, Cincinnati 2
Chicago 8, New York 0
Milwaukee 5, Philadelphia 4
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 0
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston 3, Kansas City 1 (13 innings)
Ne ork 7, Detroit 6
Cleveland at Washington (rain)
Chicago at Baltimore (wet grounds)

O.

TITLE HOPES FADE:
Michigan Nine Loses to MSC, 8-5, 4-3

The first whitewash of the reg-
ular dual meet season was execut-
ed yesterday by Michigan's unde-
feated tennis squad.
An enthusiastic early morning
crowd cheered the Wolverines to
their impressive, but unexciting,
9-0 triumph over Ohio State's out-
classed Buckeyes.
The home victory marked the
fifteenth consecutive dual meet,1
over two seasons, in which the1
Wolverines have been unbeaten. 1
Barry MacKay and Captain
Bob Nederlander set the pace for
the Wolverines with quick victories{
over their opponents in the open-
ing singles matches.
In a somewhat unusual proce-
dure, the first shift of singles
matches on the four varsity courts
did not include the second and
third singles encounters. Instead,
the fifth and sixth positions squar-
ed off along with the first and
fourth singles.
Number one man MacKay car-
ried all the play in vanquishing
Pete Hanlon, 6-1, 6-2. Hanlon's
rather weak serves and returns
were continually converted by
MacKay into blistering scoring
scashes.
Nederlander, playing sixth sin-
gles, completely outplayed Howard
Hirsch to trounce the Buckeye, 6-0,
6-3.
With Al Mann and Bob Pa-
ley easily winning their fourth and
fifth singles matches, the pressure
was on Mark Jaffe and Dick Potter
to continue the whitewash* in
their individual matches.
Jaffe, altering his serve some-
what because of his injured leg
muscle and continuing his uncan-
ny placements on o v e r h e a d
smashes, broke out of a three-
match losing streak to drub Fritz
Haring, 6-2, 6-0.
Potter, the Wolverines best serv-
er, duelled with Don Moore, pos-
sessor of Ohio State's best service.

Potter's better all-round form gave
him a 6-1, 6-3 triumph.
Although Moore and Jim Miller
extended Wolverines Mann and
Dick Cohen to three sets in the
second doubles match, all three of
Michigan's duos downed their foes
handily.
Typical of the Buckeye humilia-
tion was netterCHaring's comment
to Michigan's Coach Murphy : "I
thought they banned capital pun-
ishment in this state."
The Wolverines will attempt to
continue their massacre of Big Ten
rivals tomorrow afternoon when
they journey to Michigan State
College for another dual meet.

r

.. . .

_1

-..;A

I

I

11

(Continued from Page 1)

handle. Ken Tippery flied to right
for the first out of the inning. But
another single by Howie Tomme-
lein brought up pinch-hitter
Thurston to bat for Jim Vukovich.
Following Thurston's homer Sni-
der doubled into deep centerfield.
Tony Branoff, who came in to bat
for Peterjohn, grounded out. Moby
Benedict walked on four straight
pitches, then stole second. But
Bruce Fox ended the rally by
grounding out second to first.
Eaddy Steals Base
Don Eaddy, the Big Ten leader

in stolen bases, did it again in the
fourth inning after, he had sin-
gled. Branoff's ground out low-
ered his top ranking 1.000 batting
average.
Of the four pitchers who were in
the first game, Don Poloskey fared
the best giving up one hit in two
innings. Thurston gave up seven
hits in his five stanzas, Jim Clark
allowed three hits in one third of
an inning, and Marcus Ferrelli
gave up two hits in two thirds of
an inning.
Wild pitches and passed balls
marked the first game. Hobaugh

made three wild pitches and also
hit Benedict.
In other Big Ten games Minne-
sota took both ends of a twin-bill
with the Hoosiers from Indiana.
Wisconsin trounced Purdue in the
first game of a doubleheader 12-1,
but Purdue came back in the
nightcap to win 6-2. Illinois de-
feated Northwestern twice, 3-1 and
5-4. Ohio State downed Iowa 7-5,
then Iowa copped the second game
10-0.
BIG TEN BASEBALL STANDINGS

11

,.E

Double Trouble

FIRST GAME
MICHIGAN AB R
Benedict, ss.......3 0
Ronan* ............ 1 0
Fox, cf ...........4 1
Cline, rf ......4
Eaddy, 3b .......... 3 0.
Tippery, 2b ........5 0
Tommelein, If .,.. 4 1
Vukovich, lb....... 4 2
Snider, c............. 4 1
Thurston, p........ 2 0
Clark, pg........... 0 0
Ferreli, p......... 1 0
Poloskey, p......... 0 0
Totals........... 35 5
* Popped out for Benedict

SECOnD FA~

H
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
8
in 9t1

E MICHIGAN AB
1 Benedict, ss ....... 3
0 Fox, cf.............4
0 Cline, rf...........3
0 Eaddy, 3b ......3
0 Tippery, 2b.....,....3
0 Tommelein, if ..... 2
0 Vukovich, lb.......2
0 Thurston*..........1
" Ronan, lb.::........
0iSnider, c............. 3
0 Peterjohn, p........ 3
0 Branoff*.........1
0 Wisniewski, p...... 0
1 Totals...........28
h

R
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3

lI F
80
a 0
a 0
2 1
z 0

i

1"

Minnesota............'
-4ichigan State ........
Ohio State...........
MICHIGAN.............'
'Illinois........
Northwestern...........
Purdue..............
Iowa .......... ....
Wisconsin...............
Indiana ..............

W L
9 3
7 5
5 5
5 &
4 6
3 6
4 8
3 7

Pct.
. 750
.667
.667
.583
.500
.455
.400
.333
.333
.300

1

2
NO
1
0
0
0
6

0
0
A
0
0
0
0
0
2

Wilkinson Luggage'Shop
HOME OF FAMOUS BRANDS

it

MICH. STATE Ala
Mathews, lb........3
Smith, 2b..........4
Sack,, if............4
Collard, rf ......... 5
Powell, cf.......... 5
Luce, c............4
Matsock, ss.........5
Morrall, 3b ........ 3
Hobaugh, p........ 1
Totals ...........33

R
2
3
0
0
0
0
-0
3
8

H
1
2
3
2
2
0
1
1
13

-
a
13

Homered for Vukovich in 7th
E i"' Popped out for Peterjohn in
0 MICH. STATE AB R H
0 Mathews, lb.......3' 1 0
0 Smith, 2b.......... 0 1 0
0 Sack, if ........... 1 0 0
0 Collard, rf ......... 2 1 0
0 Powell, cf.......... 3 1 2
0 Matsock, ss......... 2 0 1
2 Costanzo, c......... 3 0 0
1 Morrall, 3b ........ 2 0 0
- Idzkowski, p........ 2 0 0
3 -
1 Totals ...........18 4 3
3 MICHIGAN .....0 0 0 0 0 0 3-3
Michigan State .0 0 0 0 3 0 1--4

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0
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