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February 11, 1955 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-11

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PAGE EIGHT

TH MCHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 11, 1955

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. FEBRUARY U. 19~5 '~

-- _-__, ._.. _ e,_

Sorority Women May Now
Apply for Panhel Grants

INFERIOR TRAINING:
Rise in Foreign Medical
Students Seen by Dean,

Museum Exhibits Flora, Fauna

Panhelenic Association's newly-
created system of-grants for af-
filiated women will go into effect
this semester.
Awarded on the basis of need,
the grants will come from Pan-
hel's emergency fund. The fund
was set .lp to put additional grant
money into circulation according
to Marlene Jaffa, '55, Panhel
Public Relations chairman.
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon
pointed out that proportionally
fewer sorority women get Univer-
sity grants because there is less
need in sororities than among
other groups.
In certain cases Dean Bacon
said the University will suggest to
a woman applying for a grant
that sorority living is a way of

life beyond her financial capabil-I
ities. .
There is however no University
policy on grants, she explained.
Each case must be considered on
its individual merits.
Panhel grants may be obtained
by petitioning to the organiza-
tion's financial committee which
interviews all applicants.
IHC Open House
Intei'-House Council will hold
an open house in their office, Rm.
3D in the Union 3 to 5 p.m. today
and 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow.
All IHC officers will be on hand
to answer questions about the or-I
ganization. Anyone interested may
attend, Stan Levy, '55, IHC presi-
dent said.

TAX
RADIO DISPATCHED
VETERAN'S CAB
NO 2.4477

Graduates from American medi-
cal schools may soon be outnum-
bered by foreign-trained medical
students, according to Dean of
the Medical School Albert C.
Furstenberg.
Speaking at the annual Con-
gress of Medical Education and
Licensure Tuesday, Dean Fursten-
berg estimated the United States
may have between five and 10
thousand foreign medical men
seeking opportunity to practice
here in 1955.
The Dean pointed out this num-
ber is increasing every year. Amer-
ican medical schools, he said,
graduate between six and seven
thousand students annually.
Cites Challenge
"What is to be done with the
foreign-trained medical student?"
Dean Furstenberg asked, com-
menting, "Here we have a real
challenge shared alike and un-
avoidably by our medical schools
and the State Boards of Regis-
tration in Medicine."
Claiming that no U.S. medical
Research Funds
Given to Faculty
Grants of more than $78,000
have been made to faculty mem-
bers for research and research
equipment, Dean of the Rackham
School of Graduate Studies Ralph
A. Sawyer announced recently.
Included in the grants are re-
search projects on such subjects as
the structure and functioning of
farm families, child rearing and
adult pathology, microscopic in-
vestigations of fossil plants and a
book on Gothic structure.
All grants were effective Jan-
uary 1 with funds being available
through the school twice yearly.

school seeks to discriminate un-
fairly against foreign medical stu-
dents, Dean Furstenberg declared
that reports from educators who
have visited foreign schools are for
the most part unfavorable.
Reports show, the Dean said,
that foreign schools .often offer
curricula inferior to those of
American schools and the vast ma-
jority of foreign graduates in
medicine are "no match intellec-
tually" for American graduates.
Foreign Doctors Obstacle
Dr. Furstenberg said entering
foreign-trained doctors are "in
most instancesĀ° so inferior they
constitute a definite obstacle to
the progress of American class-
mates with whom they are. asso-
ciated."
Language barrier 'was listed by
the Dean as one of the problems
faced by foreign medical students
and American professors.
Dean Furstenberg set up a four
point list of recommendations: 1)
Set up screening boards which
would give oral exams to the for-
eign-educated doctor;
2) Passing such an exam, the
doctor would qualify for ftrmal
examination by the State Board
of Registration;
3) Rejected candidates would
take a minimum of one year in a
basic science course in a class A
medical school;
4) The candidate would then be
re-examined by the screening
board.
The Medical School Dean said,
"It should be incumbent upon the
foreign doctor to accept our phil-
osophy of education, acquire the
knowledge essential to medical
practice, and meet our standards
of competence if he is to be grant-
ed the privilege of practicing medi-
cine in the United States.

PLANTS and animals from land
anad under the sea in assorted
shapes and sizes occupy many of
the show cases of the University
museum.
From corals and other marine
animals which flourished in an-
cient Michigan seas to models of
Michigan f u n g i diversification
seems to be the rule.
The many colored dioramas pic-
ture scenes of coral reefs, deep
sea life, the Central American rain
forest and cave adaptatidns among
others.
Models and Mounts
Models and mounts of fishes,
amphibians, reptiles, birds and
mammals are displayed in natural
surroundings and home life.
One of the largest showcases
contains mounts of about all the
birds familiar to man, from the
large nawk to the small winter
wren.
In covered cases for added pro-
tection are different birds' eggs
and Michigan mollusks. Various
fish found in and around the state
are also presented, including the
frogs, toads and salamanders.
Assorted Flora
A lighted pedastal case contains
insects embedded in Baltic amber.
Another showcase is devoted to
assorted kinds of lethal plants.
Pictured below is an amanita
verna, the most poisonous of all
mushrooms. It is a fairly common
species in the sate.
In a four-part diorama exhibi-
tion ease is pictured the seasonal
activities of the northern Michigan
Chippewa Indians.
The picture included shows their
winter season of hunting and fish-
ing. The other scenes portrayed
show the Indians gathering; wild
rice, making maple sugar and in
an initiation ceremony.

BERMUDA CORAL REEF FAUNA

24 Hours Service

We Go Anywhere

YOUR BEST BET-CALL A VET

On the third floor balcony, an
exhibit shows some of the muse-
um's techniques in preparing ar-
ticles and figures for mounts. The
matreials and processes used are
included in the descriptions.
Above the exit of one of the
halls is a quotation from Lucretius
that sum-, up the detailed exhibi-
tions of both fauna and flora in
the museum: "Nothing from noth-
ing ever yet was born."

DAILY PHOTO FEATURE
Story by Harry Strauss
Pictures by Dick Gaskill

orHr Lay Fir
.~
tii
hHster Roart GIFTS
0
312 South State Street

10% DISCOUNT
FOR MATINEE PERFORMANCE ONLY
This ad good on 1 pair of tickets-Thru Thurs., Feb. 17, 6 P.M.
BIR AND STA e5
BI U ASIE 81 11Ai
ORCHESTRA)ET
gaturday, February 19-2 Shows Only-2:30 P.M. and 8:30 P.M.
MASONIC TEMPLE AUDITORIUM-Tickets on sale at Grinnell's, Detroit

4

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OR MORE LAUGH "
M -E LUCrL**%' DROODLES!

A SNOWSHOE HAREAA LOON NEST

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Charles McGaha
Eastern New Mexico University

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C G G A R E T-T E S

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THEY'RE CLAMORING FOR THEM! Who? Students. What? Luckies. Coast to
coast, dormitory to dormitory, college smokers prefer Luckies to all other
brands, according to the greatest up-to-datest college survey. Again, the
No. 1reason for Luckies' wide lead: Luckies taste better. They taste better,
first of all, because Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. Then, that tobacco is
toasted to taste better. "It's Toasted"-the famous Lucky Strike process-
tones up Luckies' mild, good-tasting tobacco to make it taste even better.
So enjoy the better-tasting cigarette ... Lucky Strike. But don't be like
the man in the Droodle above, titled: Pickpocket acquiring Luckies. Make
sure you have plenty of your own. Buy Luckies by the carton.

BALD EAGLE AND SOME OF HIS COMPATRIOTS

MOST POISONOUS MUSHROOM

FOOTBALL STADIUM WITH ALL SEATS
ON 50-YARD LINE
Herbert V. Wilkins
University of Alabama
4 S TU
Lui
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Sm
no
Lu(
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JDENTS IEARN $25!
cky Droodles* are pouring in.
here are yours? We pay $25 for all
use, and for many we don't use.
send every original Droodle in your
odle, with its descriptive title, to
cky Droodle, P. 0. Box 67, New
Ork 46, N. Y.
ROODLES. Copyright 19s3 by Roger Price

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