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February 11, 1955 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-11

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PWAGE SIB

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1955

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1955

Unbeaten 'M' Tankers Face MSC at Lansing

Tonight

3id i 3a E ait
SPIOUITS
PHIL DOUGLIS
Nigbt Edito

COLLEGE BASKETBALL SCORES
Notre Dame 87, Bradley 63
LaSalle 76, Manhattan 62
Wayne 78, Omaha 67
Calvin (Mich) 71, Alma 57
Oklahoma 59, Oklahoma A&M 50
NBA
Fort Wayne 105, Philadelphia 97
Syracuse 85, Minneapolis 81
LATE HOCKEY SCORE
Boston 4, Chicago 2

Chamberlain, Williams,
Shoes Are Cage News

Stager Fears Spartans;
Battle Wildcats Saturday

Harvey Williams, ineligible for"
Monday night's game against Il-
linois will not see action against
Purdue this Saturday. Williams.

to play pro basketball, is still un-
decided
* * *

Advertsement by HENRI, HURST & MCDoNAML, INC.

t'A U +10 kaoi a . uj l,
who received an incomplete in a Two experiments were given a
Zoology course, will attempt to trial in Michigan's recent game
make up a deficiency by taking with Los Angeles State. The game
an exam which he missed earlier was played under the twenty-
in the year. four second rule which is now be-
i yr * ing used in pro basketball.
Wilt Chamberlain, the seven- The coast players also demon-
foot center from Overbrook High strated a new type basketball shoe
School in Philadelphia, who has: which is designed to enable the
been offered as much as $12,000 i player to get greater spring.
NEW SHIPMENTS OF
NEW and USED TEXTBOOKS
ARRIVING DAILY
For that Hard-To-Find Textbook
Try Follett's .. .
FO LLETT'S
322 S. State St. Bob Graham, Manager

MSC'S SWIMMING COACH, CHARLES McCAFFREE, READIES
HIS STAR NCAA RECORD SMASHING BACKSTROKER JOHN
DUDECK FOR TONIGHT'S CLASH WITH MICHIGAN'S UN-
BEATEN WOLVERINES IN EAST LANSING.
Dolphin Kick Legalized;
Swim Records Collapse

By SOL ROSEN
Michigan's undefeated swim-
ming team will meet two Big Ten
opponents this weekend, facing
Michigan State at vast Lansing
tonight, and then travelling to
Northwestern for ^ dual meet with
the Wildcats tank squad tomorrow
afternoon.
The Michigan - Michigan State
clash will be the 32nd annual
meeting of the two squads, with
the Wolverines emerging victor-
ious 29 times. The Spartans, who
trailed Ohio State and Michigan
in last year's Bir Ten meet and
finished eigh*h in last year's NCAA
meet, will nevertheless provide stiff
opposition for the "ichigan swim-
ming squad.
The Green and White have won
four meets this season, while drop-
ping only twi. The;, split a home-
and-home series with Iowa State,
and conquered Bowling Green,
Wisconsin, and Illinois. Ocuio State
handed them their other defeat.
Dudeck Leads Spartans
The Charles McCaffree coached
squad lost only three members of
last year's squad through gradua-
tion, while retaining several out-
standing natato-s.
Heading the current Spartan
squad are Tflm Payette and John
Dudeck. Payette, who ;r captain of
the Michigan Ltatp squad, earned
All-American honors in 1952 and
1954, and is one of the top sprint-
eru in the Big Ten.
Dudeck, a junior from Detroit,
recently set an NCAA record in the
200-yard breast stroke, with the
sizzling time of 2:27.6. The two-
time All-American won the Big
Ten crown last year' in the 100-
yard breaststroke, posting a :59.7
time, and also came . third in the
200-yard breaststroke race. He
trailed )ave Hawkins in the NCAA
100-yard breaststroke e v e n t,

chalking up a :60.2 clocking,
while Hawkins covered the pool
in :59.4 seconds.
Stager Sees Trouble
Michigan swimming coach Gus
Stager feels that Michigan State
has the necessary depth to give
the Wolverines a stifr battle, de-
spite his team's six-victory no de-
feat record.
Stager believes that the top race
of the evening will be the 200-yard
breast-stroke race, where Michi-
gan's Jim Thurlou and Joe Hassel-
by will meet Dudeck, the Spartan's
ace. Thurlow, a sophon. ore from
Jackson, Michigan, has posted a
2:32 time in that event.
The 50 and '.00-yard freestyle
race can also develop into a close
affair, as Ron Gora and John
O'Reilly of Michigan will vie with
Payette for honors.
"Michigan State can give us
trouble in the 300-yard medley
relay," Stager added. "If Dudeck
and Payette can Ain their events,
MSC also has some fine freestyl-
ers who can clinch victory for
them."
Wildcats Woefully Weak
Northwestern, the Maize and
Blue's other Big Ten foe, has the
weakest squad in the Big Ten. The
Wildcats have yet to win a meet
this season, and their prospects of
downing Michigan are not bright.
Barry Burdick is the Wildcats'
outstanding threat. The burly
backstroker has hit 1:01 for the
100-yard backstroke and 2:30 for
the 200-yard backstroke. He will
probably meet Bert Wardrop in
the backstroke events.
Northwestern's other top swim-
mer is Bill Stbtson, who swims the
220 and 440 freestyle, and he will
probably be meeting Jack War-
drop, Tom Prunk and Harrison
Wehner.

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11

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11

&omedting flew & 2);//hent~
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By BOB JONESv
A swimming rule change which
made legal the dolphin kick may
well lead to a violent change in the
Ltructure of the sport.
The dolphin, or fish-tail, as some
enthusiasts call it, was long known
to be a faster kick than the con-
ventional breast-stroke leg motion.
Only in recent months has it been
discovered that the kick is as fast,
if not faster, than the flutter kick
used in the free-style and back-
stroke.
Since the collegiate swimming
season began in December, the
record for the 100 yard butterfly
has been broken so of ten as to be
getting confusing. At present it is
held, still unofficially, by Al Wig-
gins of (.)SU at :54.6. This time
represents a 2.7 second drop off
of the original butterfly record.
Tumpek Triumphs
Perhaps the fastest time turned
in with use, of the dolphin was
that recorded by Hungarian speed-
ster Gyorgy Tumpek at Budapest
last summer. He lowered his own
world mark by 1.4 seconds with a
clocking of 1:02.3 for the 100 meter
butterfly. A good indication of the
speed lent by the kick is shown

when it is realized that any time
under a minute for the 100 meter
free-style is considered excellent.
A recent rumor has it that back-
strokers are using the fishtail
along with a simultaneous. over-
arm struke. A time in the vicinity
of :54.0 has supposedly been re-
corded by one of the nation's top
backstrokers. This method is en-
tirely within the NCAA rule for
backstroke, which states only that
contestants must push off with
their feet and swim the entire
race on their backs.

'KIEGLE RS' KEPT 'KEGELS':
Bowling Originated in Ancient Germany

Bowling, ,America's number one-
indoor sport, with up to 15,000,000
participants, had its origin quite
illogically in the religious cere-
monies of ancient Germany.
Over the period of years many
people have felt that bowling
stemmed from lawn bowling, when
in actuality there is no basic re-
lation between the two sports.
The beginning of modern bowl-

ing can be traced back to an In-
dian club-like "Kegel," which
served as a general-all-around im-
plement and was carried about by
many Germans. The pin func-
tioned in strengthening the wrists
or the forearm, as a hammer, and
even on occasion was used in com-
bat, replacing the fist.
The user of this club was a
"Kegler," from which the modern

!S!!11} ilAl Sf i--IAA!!!!!!---! o!! ---A!!----r -Oi!-- 0! s-----i!----l----fit! i r-

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A Campus-to-Career Case History

.1
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SALES OPPORTUNITIES
with
The Dow Chemical Company
The Dow Chemical Company is presently looking for sales
trainees, men to represent Dow in the fast-growin chemical
industry. These men may be graduates in any field of study who
have one year or more of college chemistry.
All those employed would be given six to nine months thorough,
training in Midland, Michigan, prior to placement in one of our
many sales offices located in principal cities. The positions are
most suited to those not subject to Selective Service, since they
in no way provide exemption from military call.
If interested, write Technical Employment Ofice,
The Dow Chemical Company,
Midland, Michigan.

term to describe a bowler is de-
rived. No German in the early days
around the time of the beginning
of the Christian age was ever
without his "Kegel."
Religious Use
The "club" was also used to
test the religious status of an in-
dividual, to prove whether or not
a person was leading an honor-
able life. The old churches had
cloisters with long runways, sim-
ilar to the bowling alleys today.
The candidate to be tested placed
his "Kegel" topside up at the end
of the runway.
He was then handed a roundish
pebble, which he was to roll
against the "Kegel." If the pa-
rishioner struck it, he was lead-
ing a pure life; but if he missed,
he had to return until successful.
After the 5th Century the prac-
tice was abandoned with the ex-
ception that many of the church
clerics in their leisure time took
up the sport of knocking over the
"Kegel." Modern bowling had its
earliest competitive beginnings at
this stage with the one knocking
over the pin the most times declar-
ed the winner.
Starts To Spread
Larger pebbles soon were used.
The game began to spread out-
side the confines of the churches
and monasteries, although still
played only by the upper class of
laymen. Wooden balls and newly
shaped pins also came into usage.
iOverlife

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Encouragement (including financial assistance)
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Jim O'Hara (left) works out a problem with a member of his crew
His territory:
TWO CITY BLOCKS

James O'Hara, Stevens Institute of Tech-
nology (M.E.'51),is an installation fore-
man for the New York Telephone
Company. His present assignment is
two city blocks between 45th and 47th
Streets in the middle of Manhattan.
"It doesn't measure very big horizon.
tally,"Jim says." But vertically it makes
up a lot of telephone business- 7500

"I've got to know about each of these
jobs that my men do. My training with
the telephone company took me through
the installation, repair and testing of the
various types of telephone equipment
and service for which I am responsible.
I even had a chance to do a little experi-
menting of my own-and developed a new
way of preventing oil seepage on auto-
matic switching equipment. I under-
stand it's being written up for use
throughout the Bell System.
"That's what I like about telephone
work. Even two city blocks are full of
opportunity."

CIBARER T TEO I

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See what a difference Vitalis Hair
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telephones to be exact. My eight-man
crew does everything from installing a
single telephone to working on complete
dial intercom systems for some of the
nation's biggest businesses.

~h (hEM SIZE I

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