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May 10, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-10

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PAGE TWO
Prof. Forsyth
Gets Annual
Haskins Medal
Prof. George H. Forsyth, Jr. of
the fine arts department was
awarded the annual Haskins Med-
al of the Medieval Academy of
America for 1954 for his book on
medieval studies.
His book was titled "The Church
of St. Martin at Angers."
The medal was established in
honor of the late Charles Homer
Haskins, one of the founders of
The Medieval Academy of Ameri-
ca.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T DA"Y. WAY l IOKS

THE ICHIAN AILY- -,~..Aire A ,,,s a vtbO

a

ENDING TODAY

-Daily-Esther Goudsmit
AP JOURNALIST-Sigrid Arne (left) talks with Bonnie Sonne-
man at the annual Theta Sigma Phi Matrix Table Banquet.
Sigrid Arne Addresses
Women in Journalism

WEDNESDAY-
M-Q-M SPECTACLE
In COLOR and
CIN3MASC0P
Dial NO 2-2513
Mats. 5Cc - Eves. 84C
HIS PEAK
OF ADVENTURE!

By DONNA HANSON
Speaking before the Theta Sig-
ma Phi Matrix Table Banquet,
Sigrid Arne, '22, spoke on "Un-
earned Increments In Reporting."
Miss Arne, a former member of
the Michigan Daily staff, is a spe-
cial feature writer for the Wash-
ington Bureau of the Associated
Press.
She. related several anectodes
concerning many of the stories
which she had covered in her re-
porting career. Miss Arne recalled
the time a DuPont daughter be-
came engaged to a Roosevelt son.
At that time, according to the
journalist, the Roosevelts and Du-
'U' Alumni
Fund Has
$110,000
Gifts to the University Alumni
Fund received yesterday brought
the fund to more than $110,000.
Six weeks remain in the second
annual appeal during which a na-
tion-wide network of volunteers is
working to increase participation
in centers of Michigan alumni pop-
ulation.
Mail appeals are being followed
up with solicitation by telephone
and personal interview.
The fund was established in 1953
to encourage gifts from all alumni
and friends of the University.
During the first year of the new
annual giving program, contribu-
tions and gifts amounted to $109,-
984.
James K. Miller, alumni fund
manager, indicated that a substan-
tial increase in current receipts is
anticipated between now and the
close of the current appeal.
Based on a broad pattern of an-
nualgiving, the fund is used for
meeting urgent needs of the Uni-
versity, including scholarships and
student aid, research equipment,
faculty awards and special library
and museums acquisitions.

Ponts headed two opposing fac-
tions andthe engagement was
"quite a story." It was like "Ro-
meo and Juliet," crossing all po-
litical lines. Covering the story
for the Associated Press where
"nothing is ever true until we
write it," Miss Arne told of the
kindness with which she was re-
ceived by the DuPonts and the ex-
treme measures she had to resort
to to get information for the
story.
Edward VHI's Engagement
Continuing with another of her
numerous anectodes, Miss Arne
told of the time the "big" story
broke when the former King Ed-
ward VIII announced to the
shocked world his engagement to
a "commoner," Mrs. Wallis Simp-
son. Having been assigned the
story for the AP, Miss Arne set
about attempting to get the facts
from close-mouthed relatives.
She journeyed to Mrs. Simpson's
home town and approached a
cousin in an attempt to "get the
facts." The cousin "didn't wish to
speak to reporters" so Miss Arne
told her that she had procured
information from various sources
but she was not sure that it was
true. Miss Arne was then cordial-
ly invited in. "We had such a great
time, I nearly forgot about Wallis
Simpson."
"Mrs. Simpson's family," she
continued, "was greatly disturbed
that she, a member of the Monta-
gue family, was to marry a Ger-
man boy."
Washington Politicians
When working in Washington,
Miss Arne found it "a dead bore."
"There you must know the right
people and having gone to the
University of Michigan, I found
that it was very simple." Miss Arne
happily discovered that politicians
were "like parrots and loved re-
porters like they love their break-,
fast orange juice."
Working on these various stories,
however, Miss Arne related that1
she had over and over found un-
earned increments in rediscoverifig
how good people are.
Miss Arne will discuss "The
Rocky Road to Truth" at 3:00 p.m.
tomorrow in Auditorium B, Angell
Hall.
Honor Council'
Positions Open
Engineering School Honor Coun-
cil petitions are now available, ac-
cording to Bob Ilgenfritz, '56.
Petitions may be picked up in
the West Engineering Building.
Details are on the petition
blanks 'which must be handed in
before 5:00 p.m. Friday, May 13.

CAMPUS
CALENDAR
A PUBLIC HEALTH assembly,
sponsored by the School of Public
Health, will be held at 4 p.m. to-
day in the School of Public Health
Auditorium.
Prof. Samuel Wishik, of the ma-
ternal and child health depart-
ment at the University of Pitts-
burgh, will speak on "Priorities in
Maternal and Child Health Pro-
grams."
* * *
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC will
sponsor an honors convocation at
4:15 p.m. today in Aud. 4, Angell
Hall.
Prof. Marvin J. Eisenberg, of the
fine arts department, will speak on
"The Seventh Age of the Artist."
* * *
A UNIVERSITY L E C T U R E,
sponsored by the journalism de-
partment, will be held at 3 p.m. to-
morrow in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Edward Lamb, radio and televi-
sion station owner in Toledo and
Erie, Ohio, will speak on "Freedom
of the Air."
* * *
DEAN YASUZO HORIE, of the
economics department at Kyoto
University, Japan, will visit the
University tomorrow through May
20.
Participating in the foreign
leader program of the Internation-
al Education Exchange Service of
the state department, Dean Horie
will hold a conference in the Cen-
ter for Japanese Studies. He will
also visit farms and talk with
farmers during his stay.
He obtaigd his education at
Kyoto University and taught in
the economics department there
before becoming its dean. He is
president of the Kyoto University
Economic Society, a member of
both the Socio-Economic History
Society and the Japanese Academ-
ic Council.
Dean Horie has travelled in
Manchuria and Korea and speaks
English. His primary interests are
economic history, historic sites and
rural life.
PHI KAPPA PHI honor society
initiation dinner will be held at
6:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Union
Ballroom.
Prof. George H. Forsythe, Jr.,
chairman of the fine arts depart-
ment, will speak on "Archeological
Explorations in Turkey."
Reservations are to be made with
J. M. Jimenez, NO 3-5508, before
noon today.
THE 23RD ANNUAL Adult Edu-
cation -Institute will be held to-
morrow and Thursday, sponsored
by the University Extension Serv-
ice and the Michigan State Feder-
ation of Women's Clubs.
The first general session will be
held at 9:45 a.m. tomorrow in
Rackham Amphitheater. D e a n
Willard C. Olson, of the education
school, will discuss "Our Surpris-
ing Children" and Prof. Leo Gold-
berg, chairman of the astronomy
department, will speak on "Radio
Waves from Space."
At 2 p.m., Dr. Franklin D. Johns-
ton of University Hospital, will talk
on "Living with Your Heart" and
Dr. Ralph D. Rabinovitch, in
charge of children's service at the
Neuropsychiatric Institute, w i ll
speak on "Treatment Needs of1
Emotionally Disturbed Children."
Thursday at 9:45 a.m., Prof.
Marvin J. Eisenberg, of the fine
arts department, will speak on
"Art as a Mirror of History." At
10:45 a.m., Prof. John W. Lederle,
director of the Institute of Public
Administration, will speak on "Is-
sues in State Government."

Workshops on television tech-
niques, program planning, and the
projected Girlstown will take 'place
in the afternoon.
* * *
"THE FAR SIDE of Politics:
American Parties in Transition"
will be discussed by Prof. Malcolm
C. Moos, of the political science
department, at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Auditorium C, Angell Hall.

--Daily-John Hirtzel
PREPARING THE MISSAAH

International Students
To Serve Native Dishes

(4: _

By MICHAEL BRAUN
Passports, visas and travelers
checks will not be required for
partakers celebrating Internation-
al Week with a culinary grand-
tour of the world tonight.
The trip will begin and end at
the VFW Hall, 314 E. Liberty St.
Starting time is 6:30 p.m.
Diners will feast on the delica-
cies of 12 countries without leav-
ing Ann Arbor. The International
Dinner is sponsored by Interna-
tional Students Association and
The Junior Chamber of Commerce.
Egyptian Missaah consisting of
eggplant, ground steak, ground
lamb and tomato sauce will be the
main dish of the buffet dinner.
Chilean Meat Pie
Empanada, a Chilean meat pie
will also be served. Students from
India, Pakistan and Burma are
preparing native curries that will
be served with chicken.
Two rice dishes from Iraq will
be served. Taam, consisting of rice,
almonds, lamb, raisins, Timman-
rice, and mushrooms. In addition,
rice dishes from Turkey and the
African Gold Coast will be on the
table.
Salads will be prepared by
French students. A less conven-
tional salad from Lebanon called
Teheneeh will also be served. Te-
heneeh consists of sesame seeds,
oil and lemon juice.
Near Eastern Dishes
Liquid refreshment will be pro-
vided in the form of "King Tut"
lemonade. Typical of the refresh-
ment served in Cairo during the
summer, it consists of tart lem-
onade garnished with an orange
slice.
Desserts will be from Turkey
Ad Convention
To Hear Talk
Prof. Samuel Stouffner, director
of the Laboratory of Social Rela-
tions at Harvard University, will
deliver the opening address at a
one-day advertising conference
here Friday.
Prof. Stouffner, author of a
forthcoming book on "Commu-
nism, Conformity and Civil Liber-
ties," will speak on "Social Chang-
es Affecting the American Con-
sumer," at 9:15 in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
University students and faculty
members are invited to attend
sessions of the conference, which
will be held during the day in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Tickets for luncheon and din-
ner sessions at the Michigan Union
Ballroom may be purchased in the
journalism department offices,
1447 Mason Hall.
Sponsors of the program on
"The Changing Consumer" are the
journalism department, College of
Architecture and Design, and
School of Business Administration.

SCLASSIFIEDS

and Syria. The Turkish contribu-
tion is Baklava consisting of a
thin pastry with fruit filling. The
Syrian dish is called Kunafel and
is like German strudel.
Dinner will be served until 8
p.m. according to General Chair-
man, Salah El Dareer. Music will
be provided by Don Bailey and his
orchestra.
Tickets, priced at $1.50 for
adults and 75 cents for children
will be available at the door.
WEEKEND
ROUNDUP
SOUTH VIET NAM Premier
Ngo Dinh Diem Sunday urged the
Western Big Three to reject Chief
of State Bao Dai's efforts to re-
tain power.
In a radio broadcast aimed at
the free world, Premier Diem
warned the Vietnamese people
would allow no revival of coloni-
alism in their war-torn land.
Bao Dal is reportedly hoping to
gain Big Three support for a plan
to return to Viet Nam from the
Riviera as a constitutional mon-
arch. Diem insisted however that
free elections determine the na-
ture of any future government.
PAKISTAN will join the Irigi-
Turkish-British pact, according to
a top Iraqi official.
Fadhil al Jamali, his country's
Ambassador at Large, said Sunday
Prime Minister Mohammed Ali of
Pakistan told him of the plan at
the Bandung conference. The pact
is considered the nucleus of a pro-
Western Middle East defense sys-
tem.
TWELVE INDIAN SOLDIERS
were killed Sunday in an encounter
with Pakistani police on the bor-
der of Kashmir State and West
Pakistan.
It was the first serious incident
since a cease-fire in Kashmir was
declared six years ago.
* * *
JOSEPH FLACK, American Am-
bassador to Poland, died Sunday
returning to Washington for reas-
signment.
Flack had spent 39 of his 60
years as a career diplomat, serving
in several European and Latin
American posts.
* * *
CELEBRATING his 71st birth-
day, former-President Harry S.
Truman Sunday broke ground on
his pet project, the Truman Li-
brary.
More than a million dollars has
been contributed to the Library, to
house the thirty-second President's
mementos and documents of his
Administration.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Watch-Silver with four dia-
monds. Black cord band. Reward. CallI
NO 2-0018, ask for Henrietta. )113A
LOST-Silver, abstract design medal-
lion on black leather throng. 404
Mosher. )114A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox
39c, shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
SWEATERS to formals, size 9 to 11.
Call NO 3-8153. )301B
25' HOUSETRAILER. Completely furn-
ished. Must sacrifice. NO 5-2902. )262B
FOR SALE--Two high-fidelity speakers:
Jensen 12" co-axial (list $55.00 for
$35.00. Electro-voice 12" extended
range SP-12B (list $30.00) for $20.00.
Both inperfect condition. Gordon
Mumma, 214 8. Thayer, Apt. 2, NO
3-3007. )271B
FREE TICKET to Scio Drive-In Theatre
with any purchase of $1 or more.
VAN DYKE'S GIFTS
East Liberty between 4th and 5th Ave.
)272B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS - APARTMENT FOR MEN.
Furnished. Private baths. Available
June. $105 for 3. $140 for 4 men.
Phone NO 3-8454 after 1 P.M. )31C
LARGE sixteen room house for lease
for fraternity annex on Oakland and
Monroe. Furnished, good condition.
NO 2-5184. )32C
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH. Campus Tour-
ist Homes. 518 E. William. Student
rooms also available. NO 3-8454. )66D
ROOMING HOUSE-Furnished. Univer-
sity approved. Available at the end
of the term. Phone NO 2-0567 be-
tween 10 and 9. )73D
ROOMS FOR RENT-Male students--
summer and fall, half block from
campus. Cooking privileges, 417 E.
Liberty. )83D

HELP WANTED
YOU CAN EARN $945 T1IS SUMMER
$400 GUARANTEE
Pleasant, profitable summer work for
college men and women with a Mar-
shall Field Co. Openingsin Michi-
gan. Ask for Mr. Gibson, Wednesday,
May 11, Room 3B-Michigan Union,
1-4:45 P.M. )67H
BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments. Accessories. Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
TYPIST - Specialty thesis with an
Elite typewriter. 21 inch carriage. Ref-
erences. Call Saline 665J. Can often
pick up and deliver materials.
RADIO - PHONO - TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service -- Reasonable Rates
Telefunken HI-FI AM-FM Radio
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University Phone NO 8-7942
1%1, Blocks East of East Eng. )261B
USED CARS
1938 CHEVROLET SEDAN. Excellent
transportation. $75. Fitzgerald-Jor-
dan, Inc., 607 Detroit Stret, NO
8-8141. )28N
1951 BUICK CONVERTIBLE. Dynaflow
Power seats and windows, whitewall
tires. Radio and heater. Phone NO
2-0224. )38N
1950 OLDSMOBILE club coupe. 88. Blue.
Radio and heater. One owner. Sharp.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )49N
1954 NASH RAMBLER. Two-door, radio
and heater. 11,000 actual miles. Like
new. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )48N
1953 OLDSMOBILE Hard-top. Low mile-
age. Two-tone blue. Radio and heater.
Power brakes. Real nice. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. 5ON
1940 PLYMOUT, excellent condition.
1955 plates, $75, NO 2-9733. )62N
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments.
Prompt service. Call NO 2-2678 A.
Graves. -)12J
TRAVEL
WANTED-One traveling companion to
rough it through Mexico, Central
America and the Caribbean. Will leave
15th of June for the entire summer.
Call Al Williams, NO 2-3173. )28
Dedicated to the discerning ear
Ouality Strings
Expert Repairs
and Adjustments
FINE BOW
RE-HAIRING
STRING SHOP
211 South State
Phone NO 3-3874

t.

:,,

I I

CLEAN, AIRY accommodations for
summer for 5 boys; 2 doubles, 1 sin-
gle. Everything furnished; including
refrigerator and use of large sun
porch. Campus location. Phone NO 8-
7391; would like to have reservations

MALE STUDENTS
Going to summer school? Working
in AA this summer? Need a good
place to live? Call NO 8-7683 or come
to 1412 Cambridge Road. . )84D
ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER SESSION roomers and/or
boarders wanted. Rent $35 for eight
weeks, board $112.80 with refunds for
uneaten meals. Call Jim Burnett, NO
2-9431. )22E
HELP WANTED
FULL OR PART-TIME male cab driver.
Apply A.A. Yellow and Checker Cab
Co. 113 S. Ashley, Phone NO 8-9382.
)64H
SUMMER JOB, waiters, waitresses,
cooks, chefs,caretakers, handy men,
janitors. Beautiful resort area, good
pay. Write M. A. Huey, 906 Lake St.,
Roscommon, Mich. )65H
SPARE TIME money-maker. Summer
work or year around. Sell airplane-
type spark plugs to car, truck, tractor,
outboard, power mower owners. Fast-
est firing, hottest plug on the mar-
ket. Proven performance. Repeat sales
assured. No stock to carry. No in-
vestment required. Samples furnish-
ed. Big commission. Write Luthy
Aeronautical Sales, 302 Cooper St.,
Jackson, Michigan, Give phone num-
ber for appointment. ) 66H
Read Daily Classifieds
I F etj eP4

(4

:;
,_I
('

GERMAN
RESTAURANT

OLD-FASH IONED
GERMAN DINNER
Steaks - Chicken-i n-the-rough

I

Carry Out Orders
Imported Beer and
Wine
203 E. Washington
Open 4 P.M..12 P.M.
except Sunday

. t,/jam p
i
111I I ^N 1.

For a Career

.1#

I

Abroad

- . -

Enlightened American busi-
ness demands that its repre-
sentatives be s p e c i a l ly
trained to handle foreign
operations. For a remun-
erative and satisfying career
in
FOREIGN TRADE
or
FOREIGN SERVICE
give yourself the advant-
age of a year's training at
the American Institute for
Foreign Trade. Graduate-
level work. Advanced de-
grees offered.

iii
ii
ii
fii

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OPTOMETRY
Serving an
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Doctor of Optometry
DEGREE
IN THREE YEARS
Professional Recognition by U. S.
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Two Large Eye Clinics
University Environment. New
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adjoining I. I.T. Campus.
Your Liberal Arts Credits Ap.
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ter Credits in Specified Courses.)
CHICAGO COLLEGE of
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SENIORS!
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I I PiiklickeA n;it ontioty n t rnrin f. FWDATIC)\l 11

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