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April 30, 1955 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-30

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SATURDAY, APR 30, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE . RE

SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

GENT OF THE OLD SCHOOL:
Hatchers Call Butler 'Part of Home'

By MICHAEL BRAUN
Kenneth Brown is of the old
school; a gentleman, and accord-
ing to President and Mrs. Harlan
H. Hatcher "very much a part of
the President's home."
Brown, houseman at 815 South
University, quietly says in self
evaluation, "My happiness is in be-
ing thorough." The Hatchers' resi-
dence is mute testimony to this
fact.
It isn't in evidence to the cas-
ual visitor at an "open house" or
reception, but Brown's deft hand
adds as much to the attractiveness
of the home as those of painters
Carlos Lopez or Gerome Kamrow-
ski.
From basement playroom,
where, Brown says, the children
sometimes rollerskate, to the upper
guest room "where Mrs. Roosevelt
stayed" the house is immaculate.
Hesitates To Talk About Self
Brown, an extremely modest
man, is hesitant to talk about him-
self. He would rather discuss the
house of which he is extremely
proud.
When showing the library, he is
apt to pull out a book written by
President hatcher and ask if the
visitor has read it.
He is quick to point out the'view
from every window in the house
and particularly admires the gar-
den which his own bedroom win-
dow overlooks.
Only after a complete tour of
the house will Brown start talking
about himself.
Arrives Via West Point
Brown was born in Leavenworth,
Kansas, 52 years ago and came to
Ann Arbor via West Point.
In Leavenworth he was butler
to Fred Harvey, scion of the Har-
A, vey restaurant chain. In 1943 Har-
vey died and Brown was recom-
mended as head waiter to the offi-
cials at the military academy.
He enjoyed the work but devel-
oped wanderlust and obtained a
job on the Santa Fe "Super Chief"
running between Kansas City and
Tulsa.
His stepmother was living in
Ann Arbor and Brown decided to
visit her. That was in 1949. He has
been here ever since.
Finds College S'udents Mature
Houseman for Tau Delta Phi
fraternity was his first local job.
He became friendly with Bud Gut-
man, '49, who was the Tau Delt
house steward. He remarks that
it was Gutman "who taught me
that college students can be ma-
ture and understanding."
When President Hatcher took
office in 1951, Brown moved into
the rambling, white house as
houseman. The house and its
Y ADVENTURE
TRAVEL to every corner of
the globe , , . Europe (60 days,
$650 Including steamer), Latin
America, the Orient, Around the
World.
LOWCOST TRIPS by bioy.
e, faeitboot, motor, rail for the
adventurous in spirit.
STUDY TOUR6 with college
credit in Languages, Art, Music,
Social Studies, Dance, other
subjects. Sc oiarships available.
5 SEE M1ORE-SPEND LESS
Your TrrvIe Agent OR
g tara~nle
AItntsf6d
22nd Te Travl Ama
541 Fifth Av.M, N. Y. I y MU 2.6544

Hawaiian U
Plans Study
For Coeds
For $500 inclusive, Michigan co-
eds may spend seven weeks of
study and sightseeing at the Uni-
versity of Hawaii summer session:
The annual Howard tour, leav-
ing the west coast June 20 and
returning August 20 has been ar-
ranged so students may get full
academic credit for the subjects
they take in the islands.
The price of the tour includes
round trip air travel, living accom-
modations, tips, excursions in
Honolulu, Oahu and Pearl Har-
bor. In addition the group will
make trips in outrigger canoes
and catamarans. They will also
participate in a luau or Hawaiian
farewell feast.
Interested coeds may contact
Mrs. Edna Strachen, Alpha Tau
Omega housemother, who is in
charge of the Michigan group.
Driver Education
Driver education teachers and
administrators will meet today
from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the1
Union.
Sponsored by the University ed-
ucation school and the Extension
Service collaborating with various
state agencies, the conference is
planned primarily to aid in im-
proving the driver education pro-
grams.

Israel's Economy Making
Rapid Progress, Pratt Says

PENTAGON ORDERS:
Loyalty Oaths Required
Of All ROTC Students

Great economic progress and
population increases are now re-
vitalizing Israel, according to Sin-
cha Pratt, midwest representative
of the Israel government.
Speaking in connection with Is-
rael Independence Week at the
Hillel Foundation, Pratt explained
rapid strides are being made to-
ward complete economic independ-
ence in Israel. He noted that ag-
riculture has more than doubled
during the past seven years be-,
cause of irrigation development.
Arab Exodus Affects Agriculture
Agricultural revolution occurred
in 1948 when Arab farmers left
the country in protest against the
new state. As a result Israeli Jews
were forced to farm the land. De-
spite increased fruit and vegetable
production, Israel still must import
meat and wheat, Pratt said.
"Israel's democracy has good
and bad aspects," Pratt continued.
The country has free political in-
stitutions, he added.
Israel's neighbors are hostile,
Pratt said, because they fear the
effects of democracy on their feu-!
dal way of life.
Pratt remarked that Israel has
great industrial potential. "130,-
000 workers are employed in Is-
raeli factories now," he said. These
factories produce refrigerators, ra-
dios, and textiles.
Population Has Doubled
Population in Israel has been
doubled since 1948. "The integra-
tion of more than 800,000 refugee
Jews has exploded racial theories,"

Pratt said. In the past, it was be-
lieved that people from uncivilized
areas could not adjust to modern
lif e.
"Experience with Israel has
proven to the contrary," Pratt de-
clared. These refugees quickly ad-
justed to modern society's de-
mands and became useful, pro-
ductive citizens.
Teams To Debate
Free Trade Policy
"Resolved, that the federal gov-
ernment should initiate a policy of
free trade among nations friendly
to the United States' will be the
question in today's State Cham-
pionship High School Debates, at
Rackham Lecture Hall. ,
Teams from Hazel , Park High
School and Albion High School
will compete for the 'A' champion-
ship at 3:30 p.m'.-Detroit Country
Day School and Mecosta High'
School vie for the 'B' crown at 2
p.m.
Petitioning Open
Petitions for the Literary Col-
lege Conference Steering Commit-
tee, available from 10 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. in Rm. 1220 Angell Hall, may
be returned Tuesday, May 3.

All ROTC students are now re-
quired to take the same loyalty
oath under a new directive issued
by the Defense Department.
A recent Pentagon order states
that any student who refuses to
take the basic loyalty oath shall
be denied formal enrollment as an
ROTC cadet.
Previous to this order, Army,
Navy and Air Force have called
for different requirements in com-
pleting loyalty procedures.
Applicants Must Sign
As well as being required to take
the loyalty oath, any applicant for
an advanced ROTC program must
sign a form declaring that he is
not a member of any one of a list
of organizations declared subver-
sive by the Attorney General.
Pentagon officials said the pro-
vision requiring signing of the
subversive list form only at the
time a student has otherwise qual-
ified for the senior division of
ROTC, permits land grant colleges
to continue their normal require-
ment that students should take at
least two years of military train-
ing.
National Students Association,
New York Region, recently called
for the abolishment of the non-
subversive statement.
NSA said that the requirement,
prohibiting many students who are

members of one of the listed sub-
versive groups from attending
schools of their choices because
they could not participate in the
ROTC program, is mandatory in
land grant institutions.
Officials of all three University
ROTC detachments said that they
are now operating under the same
procedure that the recent Penta-
gon order directs and that it will
effect no change in their present
loyalty requirements.
Attitude Affects
Language Study
Attitude toward learning a lan-
guage is as important as memoriz-
ing vocabulary, John A. Swets of
the psychology department said
recently.
Fears concerning inability to
master foreign sounds and struc-
tures hinder the student, he added.
Preconceived notions about the
difficulty and strangeness of a
foreign language prevent a capa-
ble student from learning a for-
eign tongue easily, Swets contin-
ued.
According to Swets, it is a
harmful and untrue idea that
Americans are less able than oth-
ers to learn a new, language.

--Daily-Sam Ching
KENNETH BROWN . .. "My Happiness is in Being Thorough"

many rooms are now intertwined
with Brown's biography,
If the observer should miss small
details of decoration Brown will
quickly point them out. Not many
students taken on the regulation
open house tour know that the
seemingly abstract wallpaper in
Poll on Party
Loyalty Taken

the second floor bathroom is ac-
tually the initials 'HH' in a mod-
ern design. 4
His sense of neatness extends to
the symmetrical arrangement of
the articles on President Hatcher's
dresser. Nine pencils, 4 fountain
pens, 4 cigarette lighters and 2
rabbits feet were neatly arranged
like many tin soldiers.
If President Hatcher should ever
need an "efficiency expert" to keep
the University running smoothly,
he need look no further than un-
der his own roof.

!

Come to Church
Sunduy

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Tonight! Tonight!
israeli Cabaret Might4
ISRAELI ENTERTAINMENT. I.SRAELI REFRESHMENTS
ISRAELI and AMERICAN SOCIAL DANCE MUSIC
CABARET ATMOSPHERE-- CANDLELIGHT
Admission: 50c per person (Proceeds to Jewish National Fund)
Everybody Invited,
SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 8:30 HILLEL BUILDING, 1429 HILL
Sponsored by Studer,. -onist Organization of Hillel

11

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses--'
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Junior Church, Douglas Chapel, 10:45 A.M.
Public worship at the some hour. Dr. Parr's sub-
ject will be "When God Says 'No'."
The Student Guild will be quests of the Evangel-
ical and Reformed Student Guild at Bethle-
hem Church for supper at 6:00. Mr. and Mrs.
Boehm will talk on Alaska.
FRIENDS '(QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship. Visitors are
Welcome.
6:30 P.M.-Young Friends
Students will be picked up at -one Hall at 6:30
P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erlond J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "Faith's Dar-
ing Hypotheses" Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar. Study of Book of
Acts.
5:30 P.M.-Fellowship Supper
6:45 P.M.-Worship and. Program. Student
Panel "Campus Dating Problems-Dating
Around."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev, C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
Sunday, May 1-
9:45-Student class studies Jude and I Peter.
11:00-Church Worship. Sermon Topic: "The
Body of Christ"
6:45-Guild. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Copley will
speak on "Preparing for Marriage."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev. Press:
"Christian Freedom"
7:00-Student Guild

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
Sunday-
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-"Three Levels of Living"
7:30 P.M.-"Wealth, Poverty, and Riches.'
Speaker: Rev. Roger Rose.
Wednesday-
7:30 P.M.-Prayer Meeting
We Welcome You.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship services,
with the pastor preaching on "Let the Word
of Christ Dwell in You Richly!"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club,, Supper-Program: "What the Bible
Teaches on Family Life,"
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephonou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Divine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, 7:30 P.M.--Orthodox Stu-
dent Guild.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
,Sundays-10:15 A.M. - 11.00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday services at 8, 9, and 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
"Faith of the Church"lecture at 4:30 P.M.
Canterbury Supper at 6 P.M.
Evensong at 8 P.M. followed by coffee hour.

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generation

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Retailing is a fascinating field, with
the intriguing challenge of a con-
stantly changing scene. There are
more opportunities in retailing than
there are men and women to fill them.
These positions are attractive in finan-
cial reward for the imaginative and
creative person. They offer plesant
working conditions and rewarding
careers for college graduates.
Jacobson's, an 86-year-old Michigan
Fashion Institution, seeks young peo-
ple for its learn-by-doing training
program, offering salary while learn-
ing, and eventual executive positions.
Most of the important positons in
this rapidly growing business- have
been filled from this training pro-
gram.
SEE MR. WILLIAM FREDRICHS
OF OUR ANN ARBOR STORE
He wll gladly arrange an appoint-
' 1

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Spring
Issue

A three-act play
by Leonard Greenbaum
A Story by Henry Van Dyke

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
5:00 P.M.-Picnic and Program. The Rev. Rich-
ard Knudsen of Detroit, Speaker. Quests-
Wayne U. and Western Michigan College.
Tuesday-
7:15 P.M.-Continuation of the Study of Teach-
ings of Lutheranism.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Sunday, May 1-
10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group. Netley S;
Maddox of MSNC on: "Whitman and the

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CHAPEL
1432 WAashtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Edward Sue, University
Pastors
Worship Services-9:15 and 11:00-Sermon topic
-"The Follower and His Cross." -
6:45-Student Program, "Faith, Sex, and Love"

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"Prints
by

and Printmaking"
D. R. Matheson

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