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April 27, 1955 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-27

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE F

I

WEDNESDAY. APRIL 27. 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE IWE

I

. Lawyers To Sponsor
Annual Formal Dance

Big Cities, Home Towns Lure Senior Coeds

(--

Crease Ball, annual springy
dance for law students, will be
held from 9 p.m. to midnight Fri-
day, May 6 in the Union Ballroom.
A special feature of this event
are invitations, issued to the law-
yers' dates, in the form of sub-
poenas. A policeman delivers the
subpoenas to the coeds at their
residences the week before the
dance.
The dance, which is sponsored
by the Barrister Society, law
school senior honorary. Founded
in 1904, the society has been put-
ting on the Crease Ball since 1947.
'Raw Review'
When couples arrive at the
dance they will receive a copy of
the "Raw Review," a humorous
publication modeled after the
Michigan Law Review.
This review is one of the long,
historical traditions of the law
school's formal.
Law school students contribute
humorous articles to "Raw Re-
Education Majors
To Select Officers
For Coming Year
Candidates for the School of
Education Council and Senior
Class officers have been announced
by the present council members.
For the office of president,
Claudia Smith is opposing Bob
Alexander, while Joyce Lane, Peg-
gy Hubbard and Emy Schlageter
are running for vice-president.
Nina Katz, Sylvia Leach and
Carol Brumbaugh have been chos-
en to run for secretary. For the
office of treasurer, Shirleyan
Chennault, Kathy Gemvenden,
Noreen Hillwill and Muriel Schos-
tak will compete.
From a general petitioning of all
juniors in the Education School
interested in running for an office,
present council members, serving
as an interviewing board, select
the slate for the final elections.
Additional council members will
be selected next fall in order to
give students just entering Educa-
tion School, a chance to join the
council.
An important project of this
year's council has been the pub-
lishing of a student-teaching pam-
phlet, which lists different schools
with teaching positions available
and how these schools vary as to
policies.
Past officers of the council have
been Delores Messinger, president;
Marcia Lubeck, vice-president; Co-
leen Campbell, secretary and Sally
McKeighan, treasurer.

view," which is edited by the Bar-
risters.
Psurfs To Perform
Featured entertainment of the
event will be several song selec-
tions by the Psurfs, law school
male singing group.
General chairman of the event
is Stewart Dixon, Chancellor of
the Barristers. William Jentes is
in charge of publicity.
Entertainment is being arrang-
ed by Charles Corey while How-
ard Downs is taking charge of pro-
grams for the dance.
Dance Decorations
Decorations of Crease Ball are
under the direction of Roger Wil-
kins. Richard Dailey is in charge
of invitations to patrons and
guests.
Tickets for the dance may be
bought from any Barrister or at
the dance. They will also be on
sale Friday and all next week in
Hutchins Hall.
Tickets may be bought in ad-
vance for $3.30 and at the dance
for $3.85.
English Tradition
The dance receives its name
from a tradition of 19th century
England. At that time, the law-
yers, then called barristers, were
forced to save their pennies %nd
struggle for a living.
With near-empty pockets, the
men of law walked the streets in
torn, unkept clothes. Noticeably
lacking was a crease in their
trousers.I
It is said that these lawyers
could afford to have their trous-
ers creased only once a year. This
was a big occasion for a celebra-
tion and hence, the tradition of
the Crease Ball began.
In former years this dance was
held the same night as the en-
gineers held their Slide Rule Ball.
According to tradition, the cam-
pus lawyers used all their legal
(and illegal) ingenuity to dis-
cover where engineers hid the
huge eight foot slide rule.

--Daily-Dick Gaskill
SUNPORCH CONFERENCE-Fred Williams, chairman of the
Union Social Committees, and Mark Sabin, chairman of the Hat-
cher Open Houses, discuss plans for today's open house with Mrs.
Harlan Hatcher. Second of the semester, the affair will be held
from 4 to 6 p.m.

Coed's Shoe Size

Increases

In Proportion to Enrollment

By MARJ BLUTTMAN
This is the time of year that the
undergraduate, after renewing her
housing contract and planning her
program for next semester, will
turn to the mellowed senior and
wistfully ask, "And what are you
doing in the fall?"
Contrary to this starry-eyed
coeds' belief, her '55 graduate
friend will not head for Holly-
wood and Vista-Vision. Neither
will she rent a little garret on' the
Left Bank to write poetry and
drink vin chaud.
Majors in speech and English
will "teach" speech and English,
and if they venture from home,
they don't go very far away.
Homebody Types
Many seniors insist that they
are the "homebody" types and will
head straight for their own towns
after graduation.
Among these are Debby Shavel-
son, who plans to be an elementary
school teacher in her home state
of Connecticut and Ruth Grick of
Cleveland Heights, who will fol-
low that same career.
Joan Randolph, a Michigan na-
tive, will enter the dental profes-
sion here in the state.
Dotty Philip and Mary Vanker
both hope to teach in their home
town of Detroit or in a surround-
ing vicinity, while Grand Rapids'
Mary McParlan will be a vocal
music teacher in her neighbor-
hood.
Mom's Cookin'
One coed gave her reason for
staying home after graduation.
"There's no getting around it," she
stated. "I like my mother's cook-
ing."
Although Mama may turn out
better pie crusts than the dorm
staffs, most seniors want to get
out into the world and be on their
own rather than live at home.
Changing geographic location
will be Shirlee Diamond who plans
to go to San Francisco to get a
job in her major field, dental hy-
giene. Ellen Snader, also studying
dental hygiene, will leave for Bos-
ton sometime in June. Miss Sna-
der will also follow her profession.
"I definitely won't stay home,"
emphasized political.science major
Greenfield Tour
Reservations for the Interna-
tional Center's tour of Green-
field Village and Henry Ford
Museum should be made on or
before April 29. The buses will
leave the Center at 8:30 a.m.
May 8 and return at 4:30 p.m.
Tickets, priced at $2 per per-
son, cover transportation and
entrance fees to the village and
museum. There may be obtain-
museum. They may be obtained
by calling the program office,
NO 3-1511, Ext. 358.

tot

Eunice Coleman. "Work in an in-
ternational organization or for
civil service outside of Michigan is
on my agenda."
Wedding Bells
A history major, Patricia Ward
"won't be working in the field"
as far as she knows. Miss Ward,
from Detroit, plans to be married.
Another Detroiter, Henrietta
Hermelin, will go to New York to
study dancing because of lack of
facilities in her home town.
New York will also be the desti-
nation of Lynn Rundell after grad-
uation. "I'll work in the advertis-
ing office of a national concern,"

the psychology student from Penn-
sylvania remarked, "away from
home."
Away From Home
Concentrating in education,
Joan Hyman "definitely will not
go home to Ohio for teaching."
Sharing the same opinion is
Marilyn Shoares who will teach
away from her native state. Miss
Shoares, a Massachusetts resi-
dent, will be a Spanish instructor
in Indiana after she receives her
degree.
Mary Sue Fleming from Esca-
naba will follow the lure of the
big cities when she pursues an

executive or production job in
radio or television in Chicago,
Cleveland or New York.
More Studies
A chemistry major, Helen
Schwarz hopes to get a fellowship
in the fall for graduate school in
either California or Illinois where
she will work towards her master's
degree.
Although seniors' plans may not
sound especially romantic to most
undergraduates, when their own
graduations are near, they may
change their attitudes. Paris is
still Paris, even though it may be
the Ohio or Kentucky version!

your favorite
OPERf4 PUMI

I'.

By MERRILL MARTIN
Since gramma's day the size of
University coed's feet have easily
kept pace with the rapidly growing
female enrollment.
Now the coed who wears a size
71/2 shoe needn't feel self-cons-
cious, since she has an average size
foot according to a survey of local
shoe merchants.
This figure is slightly larger than
the national average which is 7C.
However, University men perfectly
comply with the male average, a
9D.

Foot
gional
United

sizes, however, show
trends throughout
States.

re-
the

e

In the New England states, the
average foot size is from one to
two sizes smaller than those worn
by the rest of the country. But
people living in the midwest or
deep south are apt to have larger-
than-average feet.
The smallest men's feet are
found in Vermont and New Hamp-
shire with an average size of seven
while Rhode Island women garb
their feet in size fives.
If we go further south, sizes be-
gin to increase. In Mississippi, Ala-
bama and Georgia, feet are a full
size above the national average.
Champion Sizes
The largest male feet belong to
a North Carolinian who wore a
pair of 16EEEs while a woman
from West Virginia who honors
for the largest female feet with
a sie 141/EEEE.
In Metropolitan areas where the
population is composed of people
of many different nationalities,
the "average just about approxi-
mates the national norm."
But particular nationality com-
munities such as the Scandinav-
ian groups of Minnesota, where
the people are usually larger and
bigger boned, have larger feet.
It is no wonder that in Ann
Arbor where so many countries
and states are represented felt
sizes are so similar to the average
size of the nation.

ACROSS CAMPUS

i ..W hiteIi E
and
High and ;cy:
medium "
heels
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gather

TENNIS TOURNAMENT . . .
Entries for the all-campus wom-
en's tennis tournament must be
turned in before 5 p.m. today to
Barbour Gymnasium. Coeds may
also register through their house
athletic managers today.
* * *
GOLF CLUB ... Members of the
golf club will meet at 5:10 p.m.
today in the WAB.
* * *.
MICHIFISH .. . Regular prac-
tice of the Michifish City-Shop-
per number will be held at 7:20

p.m. today at the Women's Pool.
Members not able to come, should
make arrangements for a substi-
tute.
* . *
JGP ... There will be a meet-
ing for central committee mem-
bers of the 1956 Junior Girls Play
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the League.
* * *.
CO-RECREATION.. . The I-M
Building will be open from 7 to
10:30 p.m. Friday for students to
participate in co-recreational
sports.

. . $7.95
. . $8.95

Leather .

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ALL-WEATHER FASHIONS
OILSKIN SLICKERS
with S'wester Hats
Oilskins at $8.95
Plastics at $5.00
Tweeds and gabardines
corduroys, cottons
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Coats that make wonderful Dusters
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