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April 23, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-23

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PAGE TWO

THE MCMGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. APRTT. 22_ IONS

PAGE TWO THE MTCIITGAN DAilY ~ATTT1?~AV AIDTT 1)9 lflXK

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a

MURALS, SKETCHES:
Deceased Student's

-Daily-John Hirtzel
Above is a typical example of Euker's sketches, analyzing the emo-
tional behavior of children. Below is a self-portrait done in oils,
utilizing an impressionistic style.
SPINE-CHILLING
,THRILLER! *

Art Shown
By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
Students of the architecture
& design school have set up a
special ehibit in honor of Gordon
Euker, architecture student who
was killed in an automobile ac-
cident April 4.
The exhibit in the lobby of the
architecture building includes oil
portraits, sketches and architec-
tural work of the student that his
classmates called "a wonderful
guy.''"
Euker had been in architecture
school here three years.
Picture Selected for 'U' Exhibition
Prof. Francesco Della Sala of
the architecture department com-
mented on the "fine work" that
Euker had done. One of his ar-
chitectural projects, a summer
shelter for two, was selected for
the traveling exhibition prepared
by the University of Michigan
from seven architecture schools.
In an introduction to the ex-
hibit, a close friend of Euker's
described the sincere, intense qual-
ity of his personality. "What he
believed, he believed with his en-
tire heart," his friend said.
Everyone that knew Euker seems
to have had the same high regard
for him. "He was kind of a quiet
guy," said one student, "until you
got to know him."
"He was my friend," the author
of the preface to the exhibit said.
"One of the finest I ever had. He
meant much to me."
Wide Range of Subject Matter
The work that Euker did reflects
the unusual individual described
in the introduction. The collection
exhibits a wide range of subject
matter, but the most interesting
pieces are his more personal work.
For the most part, Euker util-
ized an impressionistic style. A
considerable amount of work in
oils is shown, including an in-
tense self-portrait, a still-life, and
a wonderful large sail-boat scene.
Several photographs of the
"summer house for two," that was
included in the traveling exhibi-
tion, are also a part of this ex-
hibit.
However, the most impressive
paintings of the show are Euker's
drawings of children. At the time
of the accident, he was working on
background sketches for a nursery
school.
One entire panel of the exhibit
is covered with sketches analyzing
the emotional behavior of children,
as a preliminary to the actual ar-
chitectural design. These behavor-
al studies exhibit an unusual un-
derstanding of children. He has
shown them energetic, confused,
absorbed--and in a few lines the
personality comes across.
Out of the children-sketches
came a large oil painting that is
displayed on the adjoining panel.
It is, the face of a small girl, done
primarily in blue with a few white
accents, and beautifully effective.

Ballet Club
"The Ocean Floor" will be
presented by members of the
Ballet Club at 3 p.m. today in
Barbour Gymnasium.
Starring E. Marlene Craw-
ford, '58, the cast includes
Sandy Bader, '58, Lyla Leipzig,
'58Ed., Gaille Valentine, '57,
Jan O'Brien, '58 and Elaine
Baverman.
Also in the cast are Judy
Barich, '57, Evelyn Jacoby, '57,
Barbara Sorscher, '58, Edith
White, '56, Margaret Heizman,
'57, Norma Gottleib and Beth
Greene, '58.
Other dancers are Eddy Ba-
vera, Judy Ellis, Madeline Con-
boy, Bernardine Bartram, '58,
and Bob Weigand, '55.
CALENDAR
PRIZE winning pianist William
Doppman, '56SM will give a reci-
tal at 8:30 p.m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater.
His program will include works
by Bach, Chopin, Ravel and Pro-
koffief.
* * *
MEMBERS of Alpha Omicron Pi
sorority from Michigan, northern
Ohio and Canada will assemble at
9:30 a.m. today in the League to
begin the group's annual District
Day program.
Morning workshops on common
sorority problems will be followed
by a luncheon at noon, with Mrs.
Leo Wolfe of Chicago, former
AOPi national vice-president, as
speaker.
FISHERMEN will have a chance
to learn more about their sport at
a fishing clinic starting at 9 a.m.
today at Yost Field House.
Sponsored by the Department of
Fisheries, School of Natural Re-
sources, the clinic will consist of
talks and demonstrations designed
to help the fisherman catch more
fish.
" s *
YEHUDA LEVINE will speak at
the Hillel Foundation, at 8 p.m. to-
morrow.
Levine will discuss professional
job opportunities in Israeli.
He is a representative of the
Professional and Technical Immi-
gration to IsraelnOrganization,
which interviews and places job
seekers in positions in Israel. Le-
vine will also be available for per-
sonal interviews tomorrow after-
noon.
The talk is being sponsored by
the Zionist Youth Organization.
Michigan produces more than 5
million tons of salt each year,
which is double the output of any
other state and 25 percent of the
national total.

Terrifying I
Adventure!

JAM S lmARr
6.ALFMD WMHCOCK's
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l/haim Ii fAThlER ROWN SEtoies
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CRWiA I lM A fAM PRODUCTION

Labor, Topic
For Lecture
By MURRY FRYMER
"Labor has come to realize its
own basic problem," Prof. Selig
Perlman, University of Wisconsin
labor expert said yesterday.
Discussing the development and
program of American labor, Prof.
Perlman said the American wage-
earner is not cemented by class
consciousness. Labor must then
be tied together as the only way
of insuring its rights, Prof. Per-
man continued.
Factors Up To Organization
Co-author of "The History of
American Labor," Prof. Perlman
discussed the factors first leading
up to labor organization.
The fluctuationa factor of busi-
ness cycles, which continually
place wages behind costs, the
structural factor, which with the
advert of modern machinery forc-
ed down the bargaining power of
the skilled laborer and the ideolo-
gical factors stemming back to the
Declaration of Independence were
outlined.
"In the early years," Prof. Perl-
man said, wage-earners desiring
to begin self-employment began a
cooperative workshop movement.
"But it failed in not giving the
managers enough power and au-
thority" over the workers who
could fire them, he said.
Beginning of Unions
Prof. Perlman also spoke on the
beginnings of trade unions, the
ideology for which was introduced
by German immigrant groups in
the 1870's.
"It was a socialist movement,"
Prof. Perlman said, "but trade
unionism was emphasized."
Samuel Gompers, leader of the
American Federation of Labor,
learned his principles in this per-
iod, according to Prof. Perlman,
George Meany, who he believes
will head the new labor merger,
"swears by Gompers."
Dinner Honors
'U' Students
(Continued from Page 1)
Patricia A. Marx, David E. New-
ton, Donald T. Olson, Clara E. Op-
penheimer, Donald E. Potter, Rob-
ert W. Raz, Sandra L. G. Silver,
Harry A. Smith, George Sperling,
June H. Stone, Patricia J. S. Ta-
vidian, Benjamin Uchitelle, Arthur
J Vander, Nathaniel J. Wansker,
Thomas R. Winquist and Barbara
L. Wood.
Among February graduates are
Lillian Bickert, Elizabeth C. Co-
hen, Emery N. Eaton, jr., Mari-
anne L. Flack, Barbara R. Glaser,
Raymond K. Rowley.
August graduates are Peggy A.
Brainard, Herbert B. Huffman,
Roger A. Law and Sylvia M. C.
Leathers.
June graduates include Henry
H. Crapo, Thomas B. Gilmore, jr.,
Mae B. Guyer, Barbara G. Matti-
son and Arthur J. White, jr.
Seniors in the School of Educa-
tion include Shirley R. Baylis, El-
len L. Benson, Margaret L. Blunt,
Priscilla DeForest, Phyllis C. H.
DeSwarte and Dorothy E. Ham.
,}arjorie A. Wright was gradu-
ated in February. Hilda R. F.
Hamburger was graduated in
June.
School of Music seniors include
Nancy L. Bartholomew, Camilla
D. Heller, Carolyn M. Lentz, Joyce
Noh, Alice A. Pletta, Linda M.
Reck, Sylvia Y. Sherman, Jane E.
Stoltz, David L. Tice and Anne
Young.
June graduates include Sylvia
Biorn-Hansen and Mary A. Tink-
ham.
In the graduate school, Robert

W. Butcher, James E. Keisler, Ky-
ung W. Kwun, Lois M. Thierman
and Burke G. Vanderhill were ini-
tiated.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 2-3241
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - Manuscript with photographs
from Japanese books. Probably in 2
yellow boxes. Notify Botany Dept. ext.
2201. Reward. )105A
LOST PARAKEET-Grey Black, Blue
Breast, answers name "Denny"; neigh-
borhood 619 E. University. Call NO
3-5583, Dawson; $10 reward if located.
)97A
FOUR CAR KEYS LOST in vicinity of
Liberty and Thompson streets. Re-
ward. Clearance J. Aprill, Ph. NO
3-8594. )100A
LOST - Black rimmed, narrow lens
glasses in grey plastic case between
Univ. Terrace and East Quad. Call
314 Tyler, East Quad. )103A
LOST-Glasses with half plastic and
half steel rims. Call Robert Adams,
NO 2-3189. )108A
LOST-pair glasses near women's dorms
Sat, evening. Metal bottoms and dark
plastic top. Contact George Warden,
5318 Scott, S.Q. 107A
LOST-Navy blue fille duster (spring.
coat) Thurs. night at the Union. If
found, please contact University lost
and found or NO 2-3235, Diana Hewitt.
)106A

FOR SALE
Purchase from Purchase
Weston Master II Exposure Meter
Like New. $18.
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University NO 8-6972
)344B
ZENITH TRANSOCEANIC RADIO. Ex-
cellent condition-reasonable. Call NO
2-4086 after 5. )342B
FOR RENT
WANTED-Girl to share apartment for
summer or summer session. NO 2-
9136. )84F
FOR MEN ONLY, furnished apartment
on campus for 3 or 4 men. Available
at once. Please phone NO 8-7615, 5:30
to 7:30 P.M. )74D
WANTED-Male to share campus apt.
with 3 college men. Call NO 3-2038.
)29C
ONE DOUBLE ROOM, large closet kit-
chen privileges optional. No drinkers
or smokers. For quiet gentlemen.
Near State and Packard-Phone NO
8-8345. )50D
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH. Campus Tour-
ist Homes, 518 E. William. Student
rooms also available. NO 3-8454. )66D
DELUXE two room apartment, com-
pletely furnished, new and clean,
electric stove, semi-private bath,
building in the rear, private entrance,
$67.50 per month. Phone NO 2-9020.
)71D
TWO SINGLE ROOMS
For young women. Near campus and
bus line. Share kitchen, bath and
laundry. Phone NO 8-9079 or NO
3-2403. )72D
ROOMING HOUSE-Furnished. Univer-
sity approved. Available at the end
of the term. Phone NO 2-0567 be-
tween 10 and 9. )73D
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS TO CALIFORNIA. Driving own
car to California at end of semester.
Share expenses. NO 2-8444. )55G0
HELP WANTED
PART TIME laboratory technician. Uni-
versal Die Casting and Manufactur-
ing Corporation, 232 Monroe St., Sa-
line, Mich., Saline 280. )57H
MAN for summer camp counsellor to as-
sume responsibility for rifle range
and riflery program at a Michigan
summer camp for boys from June 17
to Aug. 27. Call evenings, NO 2-9454.
) 56H
PORTER for professional fraternity.
Call NO 2-5695. )58H
BUSINESS SERVICES
PRIVATE LESSONS
EQUITATION . JUMPING DRESSAGE
Horses trained
Jerry Everett, 3351 N. Maple, NO 2-8026
)9J
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments. Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101

--W

'IIREflS

FOR SALE

ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords- 6.88. Sox.
39c, shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
SWEATERS to formals, size 9 to 11.
Call NO 1-8153. )301B
$15.00 PARKER 51 PEN going for $9.95
while they last during our pen close-
out sale.
VAN DYKE'S GIFTS
215 E. Liberty NO 3-1319
)336B
MEN'S ENGLISH BICYCLE, excellent
condition. Always kept indoors. Call
3-2038. )364B
Brides and
Grooms
See our selection of gifts for the
bridal party. All can be engraved.
From ... ..................$1.79
Engraving Free!
SPECIAL PURCHASE-A paper of
%-carat diamonds (5 stones) aver-
age weight 40 points; your choice,
while they last..........$175.00.
They are all top color and fine
gem grade.

BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIO - PHONO - TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service -- Reasonable Rates
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University Phone' NO 8-7942
112 blocks east of East Eng. )281
USED CARS
'46 BUICK-well kept with all extras.
See Orhan, 1450 Wash. Hts. or call
NO 3-8177. )32N
1949 CHRYSLER, New Yorker. Black,
four-door, very good condition. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Wash-
ington, NO 2-4588. )24N
1951 CHEVROLET, two-door, light green,
one owner, sharp. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)25N
1951 STUDEBAKER, four-door Cham-
pion, radio and heater. Hydramatio.
Perfect transportation. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )23N
1951 FORD Custom 8 four-door, radio,
heater, Fordomatic. Spotless inside
and out. Drive this and you'll buy it.
Palmer Motor Sales. Your Ford
Dealer in Chelsea. Greenwood 5-4911.
)29N
1938 CHEVROLET SEDAN. Excellent
transportation. $75. Fitzgerald-Jor-
dan, Inc., 607 Detroit Street, NO
8-8141. )28N
1951 CHEVROLET, styleline deluxe.
Two-door, heater, seatcovers, and
Powerglide.
1952 PLYMOUTH hardtop, radio and
heater, two-tone paint.
1950 MERCURY, four-door sedan, radio
and heater. Overdrive. $475.
AL GROSS
Ford Sales, Inc., Dexter, Mich.
Call Dexter HA 6-4411 or HA 6-5441
for evening appointments.
)31N
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS - Ladies' Garments -."
Prompt Service. Call NO 2-2678, Alta
Graves. )3P
For RESULTS

-Daily-John Hirtzel
Officers Elected
Four Architecture and Design
seniors were elected class officers
yesterday. Chosen were Carl
Bradley, president; Larry Kirsten,
vice-president; Judy Rankin, se-
cretary, and George Beckman,
treasurer.
A1

Profit by use of
DAIELY
CLASS IFlIEDS

00

. .

BAYS JEWELERS
Nickels Arcade

=NNW= M 1

Top Off Your Evenings
at the

TYPING - Thesis, Term Papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service, 830
)333B South Main, NO 8-7590. )1J

S

IF-F-I

MILK MAID DRIVE-INN
RESTAURANT
Open 11 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.
3730 Washtenaw Near Pittsfield Village
ORDERS TO GO-NO 8-7146

ENJOY

Carry-Out z Beer & Wine
Service PiZZA Served
at the
Del Rio Restaurant
122 West Washington
Hours 4-12 - Closed Tuesday Tel. NO 2-9575

_,

I

ISRAEL INDEPENDENCEDAY

I I

DANCE

ORPH EUM

1:30 P.M.
80c

PAUL BRODIE'S BAND

Saturday, April 23
9:00-12:00

35c per Person
Hillel Building

Sponsored by
STUDENT ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF HILLEL

-Ii

"A piece of movie wizadry!. . A treat
for eye and ear!" - N.Y. Times
SQPHIE LOREN LOIS MAXWELL
in the grandest of all grand operas!
HELD OVER! TODAY through Tuesday.
S. HUROK
presents
VERDI'S
SAFEGUARD YOUR MONEY
Carry your cash by means of
TRAVELERS CHEQUES

I

Chew SL uJId
Saturday at 7 and 9
Sunday at 8 Only
SCOTCI ON THE l
I'tmpudent, gay farce...
the audience is sent into
writhing delight!"-word-Ter.
"Frothy entertainment.... in the
same tradition as 'Tight Little
Island'I" -Cue Magazine

I

I

I

. CONVENIENT

. SAFE

I

o PRACTICAL

Inquire NOW at

x

I

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