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April 17, 1955 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-17

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Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, April 17, 1955
Lab UsesRadioactive Material
ARTIFICIAL radioactivity need
not be dangerous.
Most of our population has the
mistaken idea that anything as-
sociated with atomic energy is
something destructive or highly
poisonous, according to Prof. Roy
M. Chatters, a University alum
nus. He currently serves as co-
ordinator of the Radioisotopes and
Radiation Laboratory at Okla-
-r homa A&M College, Stillwater,
s , Okla.
"News and information releases
about military uses of atomic
energy have far overshadowed the
constructive potential of this same
energy source," added Chatters.
Administrators at Oklahoma
A&M are aware of the potential
value to be found in utilization of
radioisotopes and radiation for re-
search In November, 1954, the
new Radioisotopes and Radiations
laboratory opened which paves the
way for almost any type of re-
search requiring use of radioac-
tive materials and radiant energy
sources.
THE LABORATORY will be used
PROF. CHATTERS (SEATED) AND A RESEARCH SCIENTIST A MEDICAL CAPSULE IS SHOT INTO THE RUMINATING to train students in isotope
CHECK GEIGER COUNTER AND SCALER TO DETERMINE techniques as well as to carry on
STOMACH OF A SHEEP IN PART OF A STUDY ON research. Primarily for agricul-
THE AMOUNT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN THE PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCIES ON THIS ANIMAL tural research, this will be applied
SAMPLE IN THE LEAD BOX BELOW THE SHELF to chemistry and the biological
SD. STEFFEY, BOTANIST, DEMONSTRATES THE METHOD
PROF. ERNEST M. HODNETT (RIGHT) OF THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT, DEMONSTRATES O SENBOATING MOSP SLES WITH
USED IN COATING MICROSCOPIC SLIDES WITH
THE WORKINGS OF THE CLOSED VACUUM SYSTEM TO MARTIN D. KAMEN, ATOMIC PHOTOGRAPHIC EMULSION PREPARATORY
SCIENTIST AT WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, ST. LOUIS TO MAKING AUTORADIOGRAPHS.
M om~und ..w s~u.u.m~u~.....m.........m m a ... . . .f

.

SCIENTISTS EXAMINE A COTTON PLANT SHOOT CONTAINING
RADIOPHOSPHORUS TO BE USED IN BOLL
WEEVIL FEEDING STUDIES

PROF. CHATTERS AND A GRADUATE STUDENT PREPARE WHEAT
SEEDLINGS FOR X-RAY TREATMENT.

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