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April 17, 1955 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-17

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SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGN. V

SUNDAY, APRIL 1'1, 1955 THE MTCTITGAi flAtLY PAt~W N~YI!Va~i

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Wisconsin Nine
Top Title Threat

Tigers Trim A's
Indians Routed

:v ; Restaurant and Pizzeria.
PIZZA IS OUR SPECIALTY
1204 South Uniyersity
10:30 A.M. to 11 P.M. Closed Saturdays
OPEN DURING SPRING VACATION

By The Associated Press
Big Ten baseball teams wind up
exhibition activities this week be-
fore heading into the 1955 Confer-
ence race and Wisconsin appears
to have the best chance of de-
throning Michigan State's cham-
pions.
The two teams clash Friday at
East Lansing in a full Conference
schedule. Other games pit Illi-
nois against Minnesota, Ohio
State at Indiana, Purdue at Iowa
and Northwestern at Michigan.
Wisconsin, finising one game
behind the Spartans last year, will
field a veteran lineup including
three .300 hitters Lacked by a pair
of fine right-handed pitchers.
Centerfielder Ron L ocklin,
Catcher Carl Wagner and Third
Baseman Dick Hrlevich all batted
over .300 last year, with Locklin
and Wagner hitting at a .375 clip.
Soccer Club,
Indiana Tech
Play 5-5 Tie
The. Michigan soccer club's first
game of the season, played yester-
day afternoon at the soccer field
against Indiana Tech, ended in a
5-5 tie.
The first quarter gave Tech a
2-1 edge over Michigan, with Tony
Wallwork kicking in the only
Michigan goal and Butillos and
Arauso racking up the enemy's
tallies. The Wolverines tried hard
to score again in the closing min-
utes of the quarter, but the wind
A. was against them.
At half time, the Maize and Blue
had climbed to the lead with two
goals. The first Michigan counter
was booted in by Wallwork, and
the second by Chan Tha, who took
a kick from Don Barclay and hit
the ball between the posts with
his forehead.
In the third quarter, Tha made
a beautiful kick that escaped the
Tech goalie and glided in between
the goal posts, giving Michigan a
two-goal lead, but the visitors ral-
lied with two markers by Preju-
das and Teresca to tie it up. The
final goal of the quarter was scored
for the Wolverines by Wallwork.
Action slowed down in the
fourth stanza, and it looked as if
it were Michigan's match, when
Fabio Castro kicked in a Tech
goal with one minute left to make
it a 5-5 standstill.

In addition, Coach Art Mans-
field has pitchers Sheldon Rusch
and Bill Robichaud back. The two
won seven conference games last
year without a loss.
Losses Hurt State
Michigan State will be without
some of the sluggers who carried
the club with a team average of
.317 last season. Also missing is
Pitcher Bud Erickson, who won
five games against no losses.
Spartan Coach John Kobs has
had some pitching problems this
spring which may remain a sore
spot early in the campaign.
Ohio State and Michigan may
cause trouble to the leaders. They
finished in a tie for third place
last year but the Bucks looked ex-
ceptionally good on their Southern
tour.
Bob Schnabel led Ohio State
hitters with a .438 average and
three others --- including football
All - America Howard Cassady -
clipped along over .300. Pitcher
Hal Northrop is off to a blazing
start with three straight victories.
Michigan has been running into
pitching difficulties except for
Mary Wisniewski, who had a 3-2
record last year. The Detroit
southpaw hurled 26 scoreless in-
nings on the Wolverine swing
through the South this spring.
NU Banks on Hurlers
Northwestern is banking on the
strong pitching arms of Ziggie
Niepokoj and Don Zitek to remain
Cancelled
The Michigan-Detroit base-
ball game, scheduled for yes-
terday afternoon in Detroit,
was cancelled because of wet
grounds. The Wolverines, next
encounter will be Tuesday aft-
ernoon, when they travel to
Kalamazoo to meet Western
Michigan College.
in the first division. Another
promising hurler is Dale Pienta,
who tossed footballs for the Wild-
cats last fall.
Indiana is without batting
champion Bob Robertson, but
Coach Ernie Andres is banking
heavily on a deep pitching staff.
Hoosier hurlers gave up only 16
runs on a nine-game Southern
trip in which Indiana won eight
games.
Illinois hopes to pull out of a
last place 1954 tie with Purdue on
the strength of veteran pitchers
and a sophomore-studded lineup.

HIT FOR CIRCUIT-Shortstop Harvey Kuenn (left) and Out-
fielder Jim Delsing clouted homers for the Tigers yesterday as they
trounced Kansas City, 8-3.
FaeSlapping, Splunkings
Bull-Running Call 'Athletes'

By DAVE GREY
The Russian sport of face-slap-
ping has never quite been able to
achieve national status.
Nor has the average sportsman
of the worldhbeenable to get par-
ticularly enthusiastic over other
unusual but legitimate sporting
events such as bull-racing or spe-
lunking.
Slap for Over 30 Hours
But such "sports" have existed
and, in some extraordinary cases,
still do exist today. Take, for ex-
ample, the first official contest of
face-slapping held at Kiev, Russia,
in 1931. The object of the two-
man game was to see who could
slap and take being-slapped the
longest.
The original participants, Wasly
Berbordny and Michalko Goniusx,
swung palms at each other for
over 30 hours. After tiring out
three referees, the game was final-
ly declared a draw.
Bull-racing is another "athletic"
performance with the spectator
playing a large part. Its brief his-
tory reached a peak just before
World War I in the Netherlands
and the East Indies.
The object was to get the bulls
into a highly pitched state of ex-
citement. This was accomplished
by placing a brilliantly dressed
dancer at the finish line and hav-
ing a band play spirited music
during the running.
Perhaps the most unusual of
the non-competitive sports might
be that of spelunking, semi-popu-
lar in the 1930's in New England.
According to Frank Menke in
his "The New Encyclopedia of
Sports," "The object of the spe-
lunker is to find caves, and more

and more caves, and to explore
them to the utmost. The big thrill
comes in discovering a new and
bigger and more fantastic cave
than associate members have
found, and to discover, also, many
underground forms of life or rel-
ics, of former life."

Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
WV L Pct.
Cleveland .............3 1 .750
Boston ................3 1 .750
New York ............3 1 .750
Chicago...............2 1 .667
Detroit ............2 3 .400
Washington ...........1 2 .333
Kansas City ..........1 3 .250
Baltimore.............0 3 .000
TODAY'S GAMES

By The Associated Press
Harvey Kuenn and Jim Delsing
hit home runs and Ray Boone
broke his early-season slump yes-
terday as thr, Detroit Tigers trim-
med the Kansas City Athletics,
8-3.
Their hitting backed up right-
hander Ned Garver, who had trou-
ble in the first and last innings,
but was strong enough in the mid-
dle frames to get even for his
opening day loss to Kansas City.
WHITE SOX 9, INDIANS 4
Walt Dropo came through with
a grand-slam homer that broke a
fifth-inning stalemate and pow-
ered the Chicago White Sox to a
9-4 triumph over the champion
Cleveland Indians.
The 425-foot smash into the up-
per reaches of the left centerfield
stands by the big first baseman,
who was part of the Ferris Fain
deal with Detroit last winter, plas-
tered the Tribe with its first de-
feat of the campaign after three
straight victories.
DODGERS 6, PIRATES 0
Russ Meyer pitched a two-hit
ball game for the Brooklyn Dodg-
ers Saturday, giving them a 6-0
victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
It was the Dodgers' fourth
straight win, and the third loss in
a row for the Bucs.
GIANTS 8, PHILLIES 3
Jim Hearn's pitching and a bar-
rage of home runs by Davey Wil-
liams, Whitey Lockman, Don
Mueller and H e a r n himself
brought the New York Giants an
8-3 victory over Philadelphia, the
first victory of the season for the
world champions.
CARDINALS 12, CUBS 11
Wally Moon smashed a 12th-in-
ning two-run home run and a
14th-inning game-winning single
to lift the St. Louis Cardinals over
Chicago, 12-11, and overshadowI
six homers by the Cubs in a free-
swinging game that saw 40 play-
ers in action.
The loss -- Chicago's first this
season-gave Brooklyn undisput-
ed possession of first place in the
National League.
YANKEES 5, SENATORS 2
Effective relief pitching by Tom
Morgan, who replaced a shaky
Tommy Byrne in the seventh in-
ning, helped the -New York Yan-
kees defeat Washington, 5-2, last?
night.
Morgan retired the final eightl
batters in order after supplanting
Byrne when the Yankees were
nursing a 3-2 lead.
RED SOX 6, ORIOLES 5
Faye Throneberry, successor toI

Ted Williams in left field for Bos-
ton, drove in two runs and scored
three as the Red Sox defeated the
Baltimore Orioles 6-5.
BRAVES 9, REDLEGS 5
Seven different Mlayers hit a to-
tal of eight bases-empty home
runs in a slugging 9-5 victory by
the Milwaukee Braves over the
Cincinnati Redlegs.
Golf Score
Intcacies
Explained
By JUDIE CANTOR
With activity now in full swing
on the Michigan golf links, the
spectator might find it helpful to
be informed of the conference
scoring method, and how it works.
Two Types of Scoring
There are two types of scoring
used in golf, match play and medal
play, the latter being used for Big
Ten competition. This means the
total number of strokes is con-
sidered in the scoring, rather than
the total number of holes wvon. A
player may contribute a maximum
of six points to his team.
The men who compete for each
team are ranked in order from
one through six. The number one
man on a team competes against
number one on the opposing team,
number two against number two,
and so on down the line. However,
the first two duos combine to form
a foursome and the remaining
players follow suit.
The person garnering the lowest
total on the first nine holes earns
one point for his team. In the case
of a tie, each player receives one-
half point.
Best Score Earns Point
The same procedure is used on
the following nine holes. In other
words, a player taking both rounds
earns two points toward his team's
final tally. Also, when the scores
for all 18 holes are computed, the
player holding the edge captures
an extra point for his team.
The maximum number of points
a team can earn under this sys-
tem is 18, if all of its players de-
feat their opponents on every nine.
1However, in reading a cover story
of a golf match, the score may
read Michigan 23, Illinois 13. This
is due to the fact that now in all
Big Ten competition a total of 36
holes is played.

JUST THE THING FOR SPRING!
MICHIGAN
WINDBREAKER JACKETS
in Blue, Gray, Oyster, or Maize,
only 5.95
at
FOLLETT'S
State Street at N. University .

K

I

l

Hillel

2nd Annual
MATZO BALL
Paul Brodie's Band
Refreshments
Tonight. 8:00-10:30
HILLEL... 1429 Hill

b --m

GB
I i
1
1?/z
2
2tf,

Cleveland at Chicago (2) - Houtte-
man and Lemon vs. Harshman a n d
Trucks.
Kansas City at Detroit - Gray vs.
Gromek.
New York at Washington - Ford VS.
Schmitz. s-
Baltimore at Boston (2) - Rogovin
and Byrd or Kretlow vs. Sullivan and
Kemmerer.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
IV L Pei;.
Brooklyn..............4o 1 o0
Chicago. ...........3 1 .750
Philadelphia -............1 .667
Milwaukee..............1 .667
St. Louis............2 1 .667
New York ............1 3 .250
Pittsburgh............0 3 .000
Cincinnati ............0 4 .000
TODAY'S GAMES

GB
1'
1 '4
11z
3
3a,
4

FIELD REPRESENTATIVE TRAINEES
We are looking for outstanding men for employment in SALARIED
POSITIONS as Field Representatives handling Casualty and Surety lines.
The AEtna Field Representative is a salesman with specialized training
who is responsible for the sound growth and development of the terri-
tory to which he has been assigned. In this work, he makes regular
and frequent calls on present agents and, where desirable, secures new
agents and develops them. Each mal-selected will be thoroughly trained
and will be paid while in training.
The position is permanent and there are excellent opportunities for
advancement to supervisory positions. Many of our present executives
started their careers in a similar capacity. Anyone interested in per-
sonnel supervision and development as well as in meeting the public
will find this work very interesting.
Interviews will be conducted irAnn Arbor on April 21st. Apply to the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Administration Building for appoint-
ment.
THE AETNA CASUALTY AND SURETY COMPANY
10th Floor, Guardian Building
Detroit 26, Michigan
READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Philadelphia at New York (2) - Ro-
berts and Dickson vs. Antonelli and
Liddle or Maglie.
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh (2) - Pod-1
res and Labine vs. Thies and Kline.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (2) - Crone'
and Spahn vs. Fowler and Staley.
Chicago at St. Louis (2) - Perkow-
ski and Minner vs. Jones and Jackson.

7

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M Mm w - , w- -r -

r. .. ..

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