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April 15, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PAGE MX

'TARE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMAY, APRIL 15, '1855

FAGE NIX FRmAY. APR!! 15 1911

+waar<s a. s.' s ,awA, iVf +R 7R/Ms

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EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 28 to June 8, 1955
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the -time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates with a scheduled exam falling on June
6, 7 or 8 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening -time for each such
period. The instructor may arrange an alternate time with no-
tice to the scheduling committee.

CAMPUS CALENDAR

ENGINEERING CONFERENCE
-Great Lakes Section of the Soci-
ety of Naval Architects and Ma-
rine Engineers will meet at 1 p.m.
today at the Naval Tank in West
Engineering Bldg.
Following a short meeting the
group will meet at 2:45 p.m. Rack-
ham Amphitheater to hear three
student papers.
The group will meet for dinner
at 6:15 in the Union. Speaker will
be Dr. F. Clever Bald, assistant Di-
rector of Michigan Historical
Collections.
MIDDLE AGES TALK-Taylor
S. Starck, professor of Germanic
languages and literature at Har-
vard University, will lecture on
"Chivalric Complacency and
Bourgeois Impatience in the Mid-
dle Ages" at 4 p.m. today in the
Rackham Assembly HpIl.
The lecture is sponsored by Ger-
manic Languages and Literature
Department and open to the pub-
lic.
* * ,
TROTT FISHING (How To)-
Fishermen after that "big one"
when the 1955 trout season opens
can pick up some hints from an
expert on "Michigan Report"at
5:15 p.m. tomorrow over WWJ-TV.
Prof. Karl F. Lagler, of the

school of natural resources, will
bring viewers the latest scientific
information about trout - where
they are most likely to be found
and what their habits are.
He will also tell what kind of
bait the fish eat during their life
cycle and what kind of lures are
most likely to be successful.
VISITOR'S NIGHT STARS -
The first in a series of four visi-
tors' nights to be sponsored by
the astronomy department will be
held tomorrow.
Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin will
speak on "The Planet Mars" in
Rm. 2003 Angell at 8 p.m. After
the talk the fifth floor observatory
will , be open for observation
through telescopes.

EQ Taps
Qu'adrants
The following were tapped Wed-
nesday night for East Quad
Quadrants:
Chuck Straayer '57, Mary Jo
Park '56, Bob Warrick '7E, Gary
Boe '57, Stan Cool '56E, Jerry Moh-
rig '57, Carl Peterson '56E, Pete
Knoblock '56, Ralph Goldberg '56,
Ralph McCormick '57E, and Judy
Jennis '56.
New Honorary Members are:
Walter B. Rea, Dean of Students;
Frank X. Braun, Asst. Prof. of
German; James Shortt, Resident
Advisor Cooley House; Leonard A.
Schaadt, Business Manager of Res-
idence Halls; John Nixon '55Med
and Martin Holtgrieve.

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and Martin Holtgrieve~'.

Tues.
June 7
AM

REGULAR
Wed. Wed.
June 8 June 8
AM PM

EXAM TIME
Mon. Mon.
June 6 June 6
AM PM

AGE GROUP CHART ON POLIO-A page from the full report released by the Poliomyelitis Evalu-
ation Center here Tuesday. It shows the number of reported cases of polio by age groups in Salk
vaccine trial areas for 1952 through 1954.
YOUTHFUL SUCCESS:
Polio Vaccine Salk's Career Peak

at home, at work

5o million
times a day

Tues.
June 7
PM

SPECIAL PERIOD FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat.
May 30 May 31 June 1 June 2 June 3 June 4
7-10 PM 7-10 PM7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM

Each student should receive notification from his
as to the time and place of his examination.

Monday
Tuesday

REGULAJ
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 12
(at 1
-(at 2
(at 3

Ft SCHEDULE
Monday, May 30
Wednesday, June 1
Saturday, May 28
Tuesday, May 31
Thursday, June 2
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Monday, May 30
Wednesday, June 1
Saturday, May 28
Tuesday, May 31
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4

instructor
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12'
0-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

SPECIAL PERIODS

LITERATURE,
English 1, 2
Sociology 54, 60
Psychology 31, Group A
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Chemistry 4, 8, 23
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32,
61,62
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 2
Political Science 2
Psychology 31, Group B
Botany 1, 2
COLLEGI
M.-I. 135
EE 5
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
M.-I. 136
Chemistry 4, 8, 23
CE 21, 22
Drawing 2 Group A, 3
PE 31, 32
EM 1, 2
CE 151
Ch.-Met. 113
PE 11, 13
Drawing 1, 2x
English 11
Ch.-Met. 1
Ch.-Met. 107
Drawing 2 Group B

SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
Thursday, June 2
Thursday, June 2
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Monday, June 6

Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Wednesday, June
Wednesday, June

8
8

OF ENGINEERING
Monday, May 30
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Saturday, June 4
Saturday, June 4
Monday, June 6
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Wednesday, June 8
Wednesday, June.8
Wednesday, June 8
Wednesday, June 8

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5

By SUZANNE JESSUP
Dr. Jonas Salk, discoverer of the
polio vaccine, had achieved a fine
record even before headline news
earned him nation-wide fame.
At 16, he graduated from a high
school for advanced students. He
obtained his M.D. degree at New
York University after graduation
from City College of New York in'
three years.
While studying at NYU's College
of Medicine he held fellowships in
chemistry, surgery and bacteriolo-
gy. Later he interned in Mt. Sinai
Hospital, New York.
Began Pittsburgh's Lab
In 1947 Dr. Salk was chosen to
start the University of Pittsburgh's
virus laboratory. The young doc-
tor shared an interest in the in-
fluenza virus with his favorite
teacher, Dr. Thomas Francis.
Two years later the National
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis
financed Dr. Salk's project of
classifying polio viruses.
During this project he became
interested in polio vaccines and
began seriously studying the prob-
lem in 1951.
Six other men were searching
for a solution to the vaccine prob-
lem.
Dr. Salk's impressive record con-
tinued. He was the first with an
answer and announced his results
in a nation-wide radio broadcast.
Dr. 'Salk created a precedent by
making this announcement as it is
traditional to first publish finrdings
in a scientific journal.
Three Sons Tested
Dr. Salk ran several tests on the
vaccine, using his sons and follow-
ing with bigger tests in 1954. Later
that year the National Foundation
started their largest medical ex-
periment in history,
Dr. Thomas Francis, epidemiolo-
gy professor, aided Dr. Salk in the
crucial phase of the experiment.
Dr. Francis was given $850,000 by
the National Foundation to dis-
cover the value of vaccine devel-
oped by his former pupil.
Dr. Francis had complete free-
dom in evaluation of the polio
vaccine. He was the only person
able to decode the numbers of the
individual bottles used in vacci-
Five Students
Given Awards
At Convocation
Five students received awards at
the Natural Resources Honor con-
vocation held yesterday in the
Natural Science Building.
Evamar A. Myers, '55 NR, won
the Alumni War Memorial Award,
$100 check. The award, based on
scholarship, character and leader-
ship, is considered the most prized
award in the school.
The Forestry Faculty Award,
based mainly on scholarship,
went to Alfred E. Weisz, 56NR.
The Charles Lathrop Pack Prize
of $50, presented to the student
writing the best popular article
on forest conservation, was giv-
en to Malcolm Rupert Cutler,
'55NR. Henry A. Huber, G.NR, re-
ceived honorable mention.
Sharon Raymond Miller, G.NR
received $50, as winner of the Don-
ald M. Matthews Memorial Award.
The Howard M. Wight Memo-
rial Award was given to Jack Var-
ley Gwynn, GNR, for outstand-
ing scholarship and leadership.
- - '

nating 654,000 children last sum-
mer. During the summer data was
collected on 1,800,000 others who
were not vaccinated.
The final mass of information
consisted of 144,000 facts coded
on 'carefully prepared cards and
report sheets.
The crucial period started when
Dr. Francis'and two assistants be-
gan unraveling the facts. The in-

OPEN I.NG TONIGHT
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER presents
A DANCE CONCERT
featuring THE GOLDEN DEER
with the ANNARBOR CIVIC SYMPHONY
FRIDAY, April 15, 8 P.M. - SATURDAY, April 16, 7:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, April 17 -- 2 P.M. - 4 P.M.
MASONIC TEMPLE . . . 327 South Fourth
Call NO 2-5915 for reservations
Guest Admission: Children 50c - Adults $1.00
- ---- - ----- - - - -- ---- -- --- -

formation was placed in a room
adjoining Dr. Francis' office. Dou-
ble locks were placed on the doors
and heavy grilles covered the out-
side windows.
During $his period numerous at-
tempts were iade to gain infor-
mation. However, Dr. Francis re-
leased nothing until last Tuesday
when the overwhelming success. of
the project was revealed.

ji
(~

Watch the games
while sipping
cool drinks
FROM

Your first lesson is
absolutely free at any
Arthur Murray Studio
Find out how quickly and easily
you can become a popular part-
ner. Come into the studio for a
free half-hour trial lesson and
discover Arthur Murray's short-
cut to good times and popular-
ity. Studios open 11 A.M. to
11 P.M.
Arthur Murray
1311 So. University
NO 3-4143

i

1. SO BRIGHT in its honest, ever-fresh taste.
2. SO BRIGHT in its brisk, frosty sparkle.
3. SO BRIGHT in the bit of quick energy it brings you.
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY IT
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
331 S. Ashley St. -- Ann Arbor, Michigan
"Cok." te a registered trade.mark. a 1955, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

4

-'-

DRIVE RIGHT THROUGH
NO WAITING

114 East William

Phone NO 3-7191

Open 10-12 Sunday 12-7

r ------------------------ - - - - - - -
A w 'I Yi ..l.! i. ! . .,. .. .."'. s__. .
ACamp us-to-Career Case HistoryI
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4.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be, reported for ad-
Justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engi-
neering Building between May 2 and May 13 for instruction...
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCtIOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will, be indicated on the School bulletin board.
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

CW NEWSfor those,"
who want the best!.
-i
PURCASE AMERA SHOP,
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AS A LOCAL DEALER FOR...
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i
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The 221 puts more light on the
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Come in and see them all! There's a B&H for
every purpose and every budget--the finest

..

He keeps up with

e

440,000 customers

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"I used to think accountants wore green
eye shades and sat on high stools," John
Merrick will tell you. "That's before I
started working in a modern accounting
department.
"I trained for about a year and a half
in different phases of telephone ac-
counting. Then I was placed in charge
of the section which maintains tele-
phone service records. I have more
than 60 people in my group with four
supervisors reporting to me. Our job
is to keep a running record of monthly
charges for 140 exchanges in Central

Massachusetts. That comes to 440,000
different customers.
"Customers expect their bills on time
and they want their charges to be right.
So on my job my primary concern is to
maintain constant and rapid production
" and at the same time keep our work ac-
curate and reliable. One of the best ways
to do this is to be sure that 'the right
person is on the right job at the right
time,' an old cliche. But I found it works
and it gives me a chance to use my
Sociology training since it means han-
dling all sorts of personnel situations."

A.J

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RADIO DISPATCHED

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