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April 13, 1955 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-13

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PAGE SIX

THE MCHIGAN DAIL'Y'

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 13

PAGE SIX TUE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 1955

PON"

TURNS INTERVIEWEE:
Murrow Talks on Polio, World Affairs

G&S

Society

The tables were turned on in-
terviewer Edward R. Murrow yes-
terday, as he answered questions
on world affairs, gesturing fre-
quently with an omnipresent cig-
arette.
In Ann Arbor to cover the Salk
vaccine story, the reporter com-
mented variously on baseball, aca-
demic freedom and the Fifth
Amendment. He expressed excite-
ment over the new vaccine.
Murrow, one of the few remain-
ing 'personal' journalists, consid-
ered the Salk story to be among
"the best pieces of news" he has
covered.
He noted the coincidence of
baseball season's opening day and
the announcement of the vaccine's
success.
Good-bye to Wheel Chairs
"Now more kids will be able to
go out and play baseball, instead
of being confined to a wheel-
chair," he said.
Murrow expressed strong feel-
ings .on the question of academic
freedom, with an analogy. "Just
as scientists had to study the dis-
ease of polio to develop the vac-
cine," he said, "so too must stu-
dents have the opportunity to ex-
amine communism to fight it." He
doesn't believe, however, that a
member of the Communist Party
should be allowed to teach.
Communist investigations and
the Fifth Amendment also came
into Murrow's sphere of discussion.
"The Fifth Amendment is de-
signed to save people's necks," he
said, "not their reputations." Mur-
row called anonymous informa-
tion "the most vicious aspect of
Communist investigations, and
cited the Matusow case as an ex-
ample.
No Chance to Cross-Examine
"Wherever Communist accusa-
tions are made, one must first an-
swer the question 'who suspects'
and then 'what is the evidence',"
Talk To Consider
Creditor's Rights
Rosemary Scott, practicing at-
torney, will address the Student
Bar Association at 7 p.m. tomor-
row in Rm. 120, Hutchins Hall,
on "Execution, Attachment and
Garnishment."
Miss Scott, '46L, will cover these
three remedies at law available to
creditors in collecting debts..
Besides private practice, Miss
Scott has done research work for
Judge Thomas F. McAllister of the
sixth circuit, United States Court
of Appeals.
The lecture is open to the pub-
lic.

4 __ _ _ _>

EDWARD R. MURROW
... Salk vaccine, baseball, and trout
Murrow said. "The weakness of told Sen. McCar
the Fifth Amendment is that a that he could ma
man doesn't have opportunity to "Senatorial imi
cross-examine or make reply to thing, even thoug
an accusation." Murrow added."

thy in advance
ke a reply."
miunity is a good
gh it is abused,"
It is important

Referring to his battle last year
with Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy
(R-Wis.), Murrow remarked on
the danger of using monopolized
opportunity to display opinion.
"Since radio and television pre-
sumably hold no editorial policy,"
he said, "I wanted to be fair, and

for senators and congressmen to
speak without constant awareness
of civic action."
Although the threat of McCar-
thyism seems remote today, Mur-
row said he wasn't sure if the lull
was permanent.
Nation's Morale Improved
"The morale of the nation seems

to have improved," he said. "We
aren't a country which suspects
and convicts on unverified evi-
dence. Nor are we to be terrorized
by one man."
The conversation turned to the
recent war scare. "I don't sense a
feeling of resignation on the part
of the public to war," Murrow
said. "We must remember, how-
ever, the prospect of an agreement
takes time. The American people
want decisions. But they must be
prepared to face the possibility of
never finding definite solutions to
some of our problems."
Murrow pointed to a need for
"quiet diplomacy." Propaganda
and publicity only add to nation-
al fear, he said. "We must remem-
ber that where there is power, re-
straint is necessary.
"I think the President's re-
straint on the questions of the
Chinese blockade, the American
fliers, and his flexible defense po-
sition in the last two months was
admirable," Murrow stated.
Big Four Meeting Would Help
'As to the world situation, Mur-
row contends the basic problem is
in "dealing with Asia and Africa
more understandingly than we
have been doing. Secondly, we
must develop the ability to main-
tain a working and respectable
coalition with the free world."
Murrow feels a Big Four con-
ference could be a great help at
the present moment, but that
problems can be solved only if a
definite agenda is drawn up in ad-
vance.
"The question of reunifying
Germany, of course, would be the
basic problem of the conference,"
the commentator declared.
Murrow pointed to a comment
by David Lowe, a British cartoon-
ist, as best summing up the atti-
tude.of Europeans toward Ameri-
cans.
"Americans are going to deter-
mine the fashion style of the fu-
ture," Lowe said. "Are we going
to wear our heads on, or off?"
SDX Journalists
To Meet Today
Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalistic fraternity, will hold a
spring rushing meeting at 7:30
p.m. today in the journalism
department conference room, sec-
ond floor Mason Hall.
Art Gallagher, editor of the Ann
Arbor News, will be guest speaker.
All male students of second semes-
ter sophomore standing or higher
interested in journalism as a pro-
fession are invited to attend this
meeting.

Join

for

Members
}Production
"Is it injudicious to marry a mortal?"
No, say the winged chorus in the Gilbert and Sullivan Society's
production of "Iolanthe." In the operetta, the British House of Lords
falls in love with Phyllis,'a shepherdess and a ward of the court, Deter-
mined that she will marry one of them, the Lords re shocked to dis-
cover that her "heart is given" to another. The other, Strephon,. is
the son of a mortal and a fairy.
One day, Phyllis and the Peers find Strephon talking to his moth-
er Iolanthe who ,because,,she Is a fairy, has eternal youth and looks
like "a maid of 17." Phyllis, deciding Strephon is faithless, informs
him that she will marry "the richest and the rankiest of the Peers."
Strephon is unable to convince anyone that Iolanthe is his mot4-
er, so, he calls the Fairy Queen and all of the fairies to his aid. This
winged band, in turn, puts Strephon in the House of Lords, giving him
magic powers to put through any bill he chooses.
To add to the confusion, the Lord Chancellor reveals his love for
Phyllis though it doesn't seem proper "to give my own consent to my
own marriage with my own ward."
Work Together
Confusion may reign in the G&S Society's productions, but in or-
der to present a good performance all of the members must and do
work smoothly together. Stage crew, production workers, directors and
members of the .cast work hand in hand throughout everp operatic
production.
Heading the production crew is Dave Morgan, '56, who oversees
the set building, painting, makeup, and stage work. The scenery Is 4
designed by Al Seter, '57, who In turn supervises the painting of them.
John Montgomery, '57E, supervises the building of sets and manages
the back-stage work during the productions. Richard Booth,.'57, does
all of the publicity work for the presentations.
Since the Society has no permanent location for their production
work, they have been forced to move from building to building.,They
began building sets in the basement of the old journalism building but
"had to give way to progress" when it was torn down to make room
for the new Union wing.
Obstacles Overcome
Their next work shop was the basement of the rifle range. There,
the production, workers encountered other obstacles preventing i.ll-
time work. They could only work when the army wasn't having tar.
get practice because the danger- of ricocheting bullets was constant.
Finally, the basement was condemned as a fire trap. The staff was
forced to move to their present location in the attic of Lane Hall, The
Society still uses the rifle range basement for storing the scenery.
The G&S Society was first originated in 1946 by a group of eight
students who wanted to do the operettas themselves, and felt there
was a definite need for it on campus. The first production, however, .
was never shown. The members ended up with a chorus of three, the
costumes didn't show up and rehearsals were failures. They didn't
give up, however.
In 1947, the Society assembled a group and put on the first Gil-
bert and Sullivan show of the Society, the "Mikado." Since thit time,
there have been two shows a semester with an occasional double bill
in a semester.
"Iolanthe" will be presented today through Saturday in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater. The cast will then travel to Detroit where th*
production will be shown April 23, in the Rackham Building.

SET PAINTING IS DONE BY STUDENTS

/"

New Local Ballet Company
To Present Premiere Friday

The premiere of "The Golden
Deer" ballet, written by Donald
Harris, Grad., will be presented by
a newly-formed professional bal-
let company in Ann Arbor, Fri-
day through Sunday at Dance
Fair.
Also included in the Dramatic
Arts Center program will be a
"pas de deux" from "Copelia," by
Delibes; two dances from India;
dances to music by Scarlatti and
Handel and to several poems and
songs.
The dance company includes
Geraldine Miller, choreographer
for "The Golden Deer," who has
studied under both Jose Limon
and Martha Graham, and Dorris
Taylor, formerly of the San Fran-
cisco Ballet.
Other members of the company

include Barbara Mills and Lou
MeKush, who has studied under
Sylvia Hamer. Guest artists Rob-
in Squier and Marvin Carpenter
have both worked under Martha
Graham.
The Ann Arbor Civic Orchestra,
under the direction of Orien Dal-
ley of the music school, will play
for the ballet. Sieglinde Onder-
donk will accompany the other
numbers on the program.
Evening performances begin at
8 p.m. Friday and 7:30 p.m. Sat-
urday. Two Sunday matinees'will
take place at 2 and 4 p.m.
Tickets are available at the DAC
box office at<the Masonic Temple.
Individual members of DAC will
be admitted free to one perform-
ance.

DAILY PHOTO FEATURE

*

*

LUCKY DROODLES! ALLBRAND NEW'

WHA

T'S THIS? For solution see paragraph beow

'O44

i

TWO-" CARROT' RING
Sheila Eisenberg
University of Connecticut
CAUTIOUS BABY KANGAROO
Solomon E. Spector
University of Cicago,

RAINBOW SEEN BY MANl
STANDING ON HEAD
Duane B. Cummings
Southz Dakota State College

1 1 ll w 1 1111 I

CONFRONTED "BY THESE PUNY MORTALS!"

Story by,

DONNA HANSON

*1
t

Pictures by LYNN WALLAS

I,rl'po r o t?~0

6

s
h
LUCKY:
SIRI

r

ARE YOU METICULOUS about your choice of cigarettes?
Do you want exactly the right taste? Then take a hint
from the Droodle above, titled: Ash tray belonging to
very tidy Lucky smoker. Luckies taste neat-and for
excellent reasons. First of all, Lucky Strike means fine

..............
1 G AR ECT YES

/1i:

SHH, GENTLY, GENTLY "OH RAPTURE, HOW BEAUTIFUL! HOW DUTIFUL?"
s

f

tobacco. Then, that tobacco is toasted to
'It's Toasted" is the famous Lucky Strike
process that tones up Luckies' light,
good-tasting tobacco to make it taste
even better... cleaner, fresher, smoother..
So enjoy yourself thoroughly whenever
it's light-up time. Light up the better-
tasting cigarette .' . Lucky Strike.
DROODLES, Copyright 1953 by Roger Price

taste better

A

*

- -

SttOR
C®U!'
tactie E5-

.ini - I -

ELEVATOR STUCK
BETWEEN FLOORS
Karl D. Wright

BE

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"'",.;,G. ','tV°'}^ ,"'3w.e .'±i.t a.. ;:";ie

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