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February 09, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-09

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PACE TWO

TH MICMGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1955

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1955

'U' Fraternity
Inspections
Underway
Inspection of sanitary condi-
tions and possible fire hazards in
local fraternities is now being done
by Thomas A. Ford, Grad., Inter-
fraternity Council coordinating
committee chairman Keith Coates,
'56E, said yesterday.
Every fraternity will be checked
at least once a year, Coates said.
During Ford's inspections wiring,
conditions in kitchens and fire
hazards are checked while the fra-
ternity house receives a thorough
going-over.
Ann Arbors housing inspection
department currently does not
check conditions in fraternity
houses, Coates continued.
If violations on safety or sani-
tary conditions are found by the
inspector recommendations for im-
provements will be submitted by
him to the individual house, the
IFC and Health Service, Coates
added.
Individual fraternities will then
take steps to remedy, the defects
during the following two weeks,
sending a report to the IFC execu-
tive committee when they have
finished.
While Ford is technically re-
sponsible to Health Service, any
action taken to bring negligent
houses into line with acceptable
standards will come from the IFC,
the committee chairman asserted.

-AFROTO Photos
STANDING ABOVE are three of four AFROTC students who
received special honors at a commissioning ceremony held Friday.
They are, left to right, William Laney, John Munn and Larry
Pfeiffer.
Distinguished ROTC Students
Earn Air Force Conunissionus

Read Daily Classifieds

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
a professional arena theatre invites you to
"THE COCKTAIL PARTY"
by T. S. ELJOT
Thursday thru Sunday 8:15 P.M. until Feb. 20tH
Matinee Feb. 20th, 2:30 P.M.
STUDENT RATE 99c
General Admission $1.65

Seventeen ROTC students re-
ceived their commissions as Sec-
ond Lieutenants in the Air Force
in ceremonies held Friday at the
University.
Included in the group were four
graduates: Leonard J. Kuj awa,
Grad; William B. Laney, '55BAd;
John S. Munn, '55E, and Larry C.
Pfeiffer, '55NR, who are Disting-
uished AFROTC students.
To be eligible for selection as a
Distinguished AFROTC Student, a
cadet must have completed his
last year of air - science training
with an academic standing among
the upper third of the course.
He must also have an accumula-
tive academic rating among the
upper third of all students in the

University pursuing the same
major and graduating the same
year. Leadership abilities shown in
extra-curricular activities and
summer camp and the possession
of a high moral character are fur-
ther qualifications for the title.
Other cadets receiving their
commissions at Friday's ceremony
were Albert H. Burchfield, '55,
Charles W. Dawson, '55, Peri Ga-
galis, '55, Mike W. Gural, '55E,
David L. Heinzman, '55, Ronald
H. Herr, '55BAd.
Also Clarence A. Kostrzewa, '55
BAd, Henry S. Lang, '55, Norvard
N. Nalan, '55Ed., Kenneth H. Ross,
'55A&D, Richard J. Strozewski,
'55E, Ronald M. Williams, '55 and
Carl E. Lindow, '55E.

Reshuffling
Likely After
Resignation
(Continued from Page 1)
the fore again since Stalin's
death?
Will Krushchev enter the gov-
ernment as a deputy 15remier or
continue as chief of the Commu-
nist party and general expediter
of everything from livestock and
grain through expanding the pop-
ulations to huge building pro-
grams?
And what new duties will be
assigned to Malenkov?
There are riddles still to be
solved here and most observers be-
lieve the full story is far from
told.
At Morning Session
Does Bulganin's appointment as
Premier mean that the: army is
coming further to the fore and
taking over in the Soviet Union?
Most people here, however, still
advise a wait-and-see attitude on
the prospective reconstruction of
the government.
Malenkov resigned at a morn-
ing session of the Parliament,
confessing himself a failure in the
field of agriculture and an inex-
perienced hand in the affairs of
government. At the afternoon ses-
sion Khrushchev nominated Bul-
ganin, and received a standing
ovation.
Then Molotov went to the ros-
trum in the great Kremlin Palace.
While diplomats listened in the
packed and tense galleries, he out-
lined the Soviet idea of what
would come from a hydrogen
bomb war.
He said the United States had
miscalculated the time it would
take the Soviet Union to develop
itomic weapons. Then he asserted:
"In the production of the hy-
drogen weapon the Soviet people
have achieved such a success that
it is not the Soviet Union but the
U.S.A. which is in the position of
laggard."
Not Weaker Party
He said a comparison of the
true strength of the United States
and the Soviet Union would show
this nation is not the weaker
party. He declared the Soviet Un-
ion wants to compete with the
United States in atomic matters
only "in using atomic energy for
peaceful aims."
He warned:
"In case of eventual war, world
civilization will not perish but
what will be destroyed is the rotten
social system with its 'blood-sat-
urated imperialism which is being
rejected by oppressed peoples."
In view of the tenor of Molotov's
remarks-obviously to be taken as
a major statement of foreign pol-
icy-Western diplomats noted with
particular interest that a man as-
sociated with the military had be-
come the new Premier. There was
some speculation here that it
meant a stronger role for the
armed forces in Soviet internal
and external affairs, even though
Bulganin is not a career military
man but an old Communist ad-
ministrator.
Older Than Malenkov
The white-bearded, handsome
Bulganin at 59 is six years older
than Malenkov.
Diplomatic quarters regarded
Bulganin as rather a dark horse
in the race for the premiership.
Some speculated that Bulganin
would be a sort of chairman of
the board-a coordinator-and
not a strong personal leader.
There was little question about

the influential role of Khrushchev,
personally identified with all the
most important events in Soviet
life the past year. He had charge
of the new agricultural program
with its stress on mechanization
and the exploitation of virgin
lands of Siberia and Central Asia.
He sparked the drive for concen-
tration on heavy industry.
Malenkov had been associated
since August 1953, with a drive
to increase light industry produc-
tion for consumer goods-a pro-
gram which Khrushchev person-
ally discredited before last month's
Central Committee meeting.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 431
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Red Wallet at Yost Field House
Monday afternoon. $5 reward if wallet
is returned with money. Ext. 230,
NO 2-5553. )66A
LOST-One D.U. pin over J-Hop week-
end. Call 306 Mosher. )67A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1951 CHEVROLET four door, radio,
heater--Green and Real Nice. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )205B
1940 PONTIAC, two door, new rubber
and clean. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)203B
1952 CHEVROLET four door, radio,
heater. low mileage. The big lot
across from downtown carport, Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )202B
TUXEDO, size 40-42, excellent condi-
tion. Also 3 dress shirts, 16-33, 2-
15234. NO 3-3821. )215B
1948 CHEVROLET Club Coupe, one
owner. new tires, real clean. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )221B
1947 CHEVROLET two-door Aero Sedan,
black, radio and heater, one owner.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588 )220B
MAKE MONEY in spare time. Parking
lotstriping machine-anyreasonable
offer takes, T. W. Tuttle, NO 2-6674.
)226B
FOR SALE Royal portable, elite type.
Call Patricia Cooper evenings,2NO
3-1511, Ext. 544. )225B
8 RED, BLACK and Beige Plaid Bates
Bedspread Lengths. Can also use for
drapes. $4.00 per bedspread length.
Call NO 2-2569. )224B
AUTOMATIC ENLARGER Focomat No.
2. Fully automatic accommodates
35mm and 2x3 negatives. Lens
equipment Leitz s cm. 1-35 Leitz
9-5 cm 1-4. Phone NO 3-2666 or NO
8-6666. )223B
1950 CHEVROLET-Deluxe Club Coupe
privately owned, two-tone grey. Ex-
cellent upholstery, exterior, mechan-
ical condition. Radio and heater, good
tires. '55 liscense, $495 cash. NO 2-8644.
)228B
KLIPSCHORN. Perfect condition. Call
NO 2-1291, after six. )229B
1948 CHEVROLET, radio and heater.
Clean. Call NO 8-9662 after 5 P.M.
)230B
DOBERMAN PINCHER, excellent fra-
ternity pet. A.K.C. registered. 5
months old. $60. NO 8-8169. )231B
1946 FORD-Radio, heater, $150. 1947
Buick sedan, radio and heater, $150.
Fitzgerald-:Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit
St. NO 8-8141. )232B

Tou /(OI

FOR SALE
CAMERA WITH FLASH-Vito II-3.5
lens, 35mm. Speeds 1-500 $35. NO
2-7666. )234B
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
Halicrafters Radios and Television
1217 So. University Ph. NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )47I
FOR RENT
ONE OR TWO GIRLS to share 4-roor
furnished apt. on Arch near Packard
and State. NO 3-3472 after 5 P.M. )20C
SUITE: living, study room with fire-
place, telephone; twin bedroom:
private bath. Garage space. For two
gentlemen. References required. NO
3-5841. )24C
APARTMENT for Men Students, Cam-
pus, furnished, 2 bedrooms, kitchen,
living room, bath, $140; 1 bedroom
apt., furnished, $105. NO 3-8454. )23C
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. Student rooms.
)23D
DOUBLE ROOM, modern furnishings
near campus. 1111 White, NO 2-9625.
)39D
1, 2, AND 3-MAN ROOMS-3 blocks from
campus-$6 per week. Phone Bill Lar-
son at NO 2-3173. )41D
3 ROOM APARTMENT to share with
male student. NO 2-4221 Nights. )42D
STUDENT ROOM, men, on campus.
Double at $6.50 each. Single $9. NO
8-9402 or NO 8-6087. )43D
VERY NICE ROOM, 2 blocks from cam
pus, quiet street, 1320 Forrest Court.
NO 3-4685. )44D
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Good food. Close
to campus. Any combination of meals
desired. Call NO 3-8581 for informa-
tion. )8E
BOARDERS WANTED. Any arrange-
ment of meals. Breakfast 30 cents,
lunch 60 cents, dinner $1.20. Call NO
3-5806. )9E
PERSONAL
STUDENTS-begin or continue your
piano playing while at college. Artist
teachers-practice facilities. Robert
Dumm Piano Studios, call NO 2-3541.
)54F
ORGANIZING SIMMON TOUR to Eur-
ope, about $1,100. French line trans-
portation. Small group plans from
itinerary. For information call Ar-
lene Fineman at NO 8-9388. )56F
Atlantic Monthly ........$2 (8 mos.)
Holiday .................$3 (10 mos.)
Ladies Home Journal ....$4 (20 mos.)
*Life .........................$4 (yr.)
*Newsweek ...................$3 (yr.)
Sat. Evening Post ....$3.50 (35 wks.)
*Time .....................$3 (yr.)
U. S. News...........$2.67 (26 wks.)
*Students only. Many other specials
for a limited time only. Ideal Valen-
tine gifts. Phone NO 2-3061, Student
Periodical. )55F
HELP WANTED
WANT SALESMEN for Michigan. Jacket
emblems. Nord, Box 92, Forest Hills,
N.Y. )30H

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
sax washed also. )8
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
BABY OR SMALL CHILD for day care
in liscensed home. NO 3-5830. )23I
TYPING WANTED-reasonable rates.
Mrs. Mullet, 726 S. Main NO 8-6883.
)221
TYPING-Thesis, term papers, etc. Rea-
sonable rates, prompt service, 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )251
RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)261
WANTED TO BUY
BACH CORONET, used First Line In.
strument. Call Collect Royal Oak,
Lincoln 2-4135. )222B
ALTERATIONS
DRESSMAKING, ALTERATIONS, HEMS.
Prompt service, Call NO 3-0783. )4N
ALTERATIONS. LADIES' GARMENTS.
Prompt Service. Call NO 2-2678 Alpha
Graves. 241
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALTY
NO 2-7787
for 2-3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

#'

4

Revervations NO 2-5915

Masonic Temple, 327 S. Fourth

New 11-Point Program for

'55

Daily

DIAL NO 2-2513
for Schedule
Information

ICHGA

Matinees 50c
Nights 80c

Adopted by Ann Arbor GOP

1 <

"ALEC GUINNESS
contributes another gem
to his catalogue of
brilliant portrayals!"
-Quinn, Daily Mirror

M

By MARY ANN THOMAS

Vv

I

Ann Arbor's Republican organi-
zation adopted an 11-point plat-
form for 1955 and elected new of-
ficers at the annual meeting of the
GOP City Committee during the
mid-semester vacation period.
In the new platform local Re-
publicans recommended establish-
ment by the City Council of a bi-
partisan advisory committee on
Human Relations to deal with
such human relations problems
Out of Jules Verne's
great hwa~ advet 4~ col
The
Motion JPicture
TY3CHNICOLOR
PAUL A S. PETER LRRE
{ 1 0 N

I

that can not be handled by exist-
ing agencies.
Pledging a continuation of joint
study and mutual aid between the
City and the University, the plat-
form also expresses the desire to
develop the community's Huron
River property as a recreation fa-
cility for both townspeople and
the student body.
Study Needs of Schools
Other planks of the GOP plat-
form pledge adoption of a sound
plan of development for commun-
ity recreation purposes of the
Fairgrounds property, study of im-
provement needs of the city and
its school system, and continua-
tion of city, county and school
system coordination to avoid du-
plication and spread improvement
costs more evenly over the years.
The platform further pledges
Republicans to encourage the free
enterprise development of low in-
come group housing, to continue
study of local parking problems
and to continue the "wise finan-
cial approach to local govern-
mental problems" keeping within
budgetary limits.
Heading the slate of new of-
ficers, Florence Crane was re-
elected chairman of the city Re-
publican committee. Mrs. Crane is
the first woman to hold the chair-
manship in Ann Arbor.
Other Officers
Burdett R. Seaman was elected
vice-chairman in charge of fi-
nance; Kenneth MacDonald was
elected vice-chairman in charge
of campaign and John S. Dobson
was chosen vice-chairman in
charge of public relations.
Elizabeth Davenport and Ruth
Hobbs were re-elected to co-chair-
manship of ward organizationsa
while Helen Forsythe, Gordon Mc-,
Donald and Virginia Goddard were
selected as headquarters chairman,3
treasurer and secretary respec-;
tively.

Cl

assifieds

Bring
Quick
Results

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
offesaSecondSemesterMembership
FEB. 14-"METAMORPHOSIS"
Kafka's story as it was produced on the U. of Mich. campus
and
"ZERO DE CONDUITE"
Vigo's remarkable experimental film
FEB. 28-"THE INVISIBLE MAN"
MARCH 21-"DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE" with John Barrymore
APRIL 11-To Be Announced
MAY 2-"THE CRAZY RAY" directed by Rene Clair
MAY 16-"METROPOLIS" directed by Fritz Lang
Six Programs for $2.50 AVAILABLE AT DOOR
No Single Admissions will be sold

m w ew i

Dial NO,
Schedule1

2-3136 for
Information

- , - - s , - - - - - II

HE RBET TREYON
CIGARETTES

U_APEST QUARTET
JOSEF ROISEMAN . . . . . . Viola
ALEXANDER SCHNEIDER . . Violin
BORIS KROYT Viola
MISCHA SCHNEIDER . . . . Cello
assisted by
ROBERT COURTE . . . . . . . Viola
in
.,.CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
FE B18,1920I

i11

'rte

-7htcWof- d TmvdaW -6
Presents DR. J. GERALD HOOPER
with his remarkable color motion picture lecture
IFALIAN INTERLUDE
Featuring Venice, Florence, Pompeii, Naples, Sorrento, Milan, Vatican City, Rome, Amalfi 4

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nennrnit

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