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March 31, 1955 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-31

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THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1955 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

I
...No

PRO-CON FEELINGS:

Little Red Laboratory

Available Lit Facilities
Evaluated by Counselors

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a series of four articles reporting
the findings in surveys of the literary
college counseling facilities by James
D. Shortt, Jr., which were done in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Doctor of
Philosophy.)
By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
According to a recent survey of
literary college counselors, all but
one counselor feels that the pre-
sent set-up is necessary.
The literary college counselors,
58 in number, for the most part,
indicated that "opportunity to help
the students work out their prob-
lems" was the most satisfactory
aspect of their job.
Other "satisfactory aspects" in-
cluded getting . acquainted with
students in a way which teaching
does not permit, a chance to be-
come aware of student problems,
and a chance to work with the
better student.
Indifferent Students
As for dissatisfaction, those list-
ed included working with the in-
different student, contacts with'
students are too few and far be-
tween, and not being able to solve
students' problems because of
lack of time and understanding.
A small group of counselors re-
gistered dissatisfaction abqut poor
counseling during registration,
when many students wait to have
their elections approved.
Better than half of the counsel-
ors indicated pro-con feelings
about their jobs. And the same
TTRT'IAnd1!l 'N "Pd

number reported they preferred
the present set-up of working with
a student for only two years.
Allied Services
For the most part, counselors
see their counselees rather infre-
quently. Most of them do not rely
upon allied services for aid in
student problem-solving.
In answering a question on opin-
ion of basic distribution require-
ments for graduation in the liter-
ary school, only seven percent re-
vealed ignorance of such require-
ments.
In addition, about three-quar-
ters of the counselors liked or were
satisfied with the basic require-
ments for graduation.
'Personality'
One-third of the counselors felt
that no special training is neces-
sary to do their work satisfactorily.
Another third thought that only
those instructors with a "parti-
cular kind of personality" should
counsel..
Four-fifths of the counselors
said that their teaching experience.
was the best possible preparation
for academic counseling.
Suggestions for improvements
and additional facilities by the
counselors included orienting stu-
dents to existing counseling facil-
ities and encouraging them to use
them and greater availability of
counselors and improvement of
the present services.

Union Heads
To Be Named
The Union's senior appoint-
ments for president and executive
secretary will be. announced April
11.
The five men petitioning for the
top Union positions are: Robert
Blossey, '55BAd; Mark Gallon, '56;
Merrill Kaufman, '56E; Todd Leif,
'56; and Keith Pohl, '56BAd. They
are currently serving on the Union
executive council.
The new officers will replace
outgoing president Tom Leopold
and executive secretary Dick Pink-
erton.
The_ appointments will become
effective immediately, and the
new officers will make junior ap-
pointments to the executive coun-
cil April 18.

SPEED-O-WEAVE
Small weaving frame for mak-
ing doilies, piece mats and
centerpieces. Use with cotton
yarn. Good summer hobby.
Tuft rugs, perfect for bath-
rooms and bedroom.
STRAW YARN
FOR SUMMER
COLONIAL
YARN SHOP
324 E. Liberty NO 2-7920
Open 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Closed Saturday
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

-Daily-Esther Goudsmit
UNION PRESIDENT LEOPOLD PRESENTS
LIFE MEMBERSHIP CARD
Union Life Memberships Now
Available to Eligible Students

"GOOD OLD DAYS"-The University's first engineering building,
this mechanical laboratory was built in 1881 on the southeast cor-
ner of the campus. The photograph is from the collection of
Mrs. C. B. Green of Ann Arbor and appears in a history of the
engineering college now being distributed.

By LEW HAMBURGER
Life memberships, one of the
unique features of the Michigan
Union, are available now to all
male students having attended the
University for eight full tuition
semesters.
Those eligible may obtain their
cards, buttons, and identification
tags from Miss Elsa Staeb at the
Union Business Offices.
Life membership entitles alumni
and their immediate family to the
Gross To Address
Conference Today
The"seventh annual conference
for school board members, school
officials and laymen will be held
today in Rackham Bldg.
The conference will open with -a
welcome by University president
Harlan H. Hatcher. Dr. Neal Gross,
director of the school executive
studies at Harvard University will
speak on superintendent relation-
ships.
Pacifist To Talk
An illustrated talk will be given
by Floyd Schmoe, Quaker pacifist,
about his work in Japan and Ko-
rea at 8:00 p.m. Thursday in the
Wesley Lounge of the First Metho-
dist Church.

uses and privileges of the Union in
addition to special privileges on
guest rooms.
Membership Cards
Each life member receives a
membership card, which also
serves as an identification card.
In addition, members get a sil-
ver tag with their number on it
which is for use as identification
for keys, or other persorfal belong-
ings. The Union's up-to-date ad-
dress file on all members enables
the cards and tags to be used to
insure return of lost items.
Every member also is given a
Union life membership button, the
only external identification that a
University student receives upon
graduation from Michigan.
Union Buttons
The Union buttons are recog-
nized world over by graduates of
Michigan, and the Union gets
many requests from former mem-
bers to have buttons sent to them
for recognition purposes at reun-
ions, banquets, or other University
functions every year.
Life members are given special
favor in the reservation' of guest
rooms, and on football weekends
all rooms are reserved for life
members until the Monday pre-
ceding the game.
The Michigan Union is one of
the few Unions to offer a feature
of this sort. Life membership be-
gan here in 1920, but didn't become
automatic upon graduation until
1926. Until that time life member-
ships could be obtained only by
purchase.
'olunt he' by G&S
"Iolanthe," tLe fifteenth presen-
tation of the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society, will be presented April 13
through 16 at the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theater.

ry "

UINELCUO Gift Coupon rIan
Provides Needed Supplies

BUFFET LUNCH
for $1.00
GOLDEN APPLES

By SHIRLEY CROOG
With a goal of $25,000 for the
Gift Coupon Plan, the Michigan
Council for UNESCO is undertak-
ing its 1955 project.
UNESCO Gift Coupons is a
''money order" plan whereby
groups may send aid to schools,
libraries, and other educational,
scientific, and cultural institutions
for needed supplies in underdevel-
oped areas in the world.
Through the gift coupon plan,
UNESCO insures sending useful
items to needy areas. The donors
are relieved of packing and ship-
ping articles.
Helps Six Areas
According to Prof. William Trow
of the educational psychology de-
partment, founder of the Michigan
Council for UNESCO and mem-
Income Tax
Final Nears
The Ides of April will soon be
here.
Income tax forms are due April
15, which has replaced the Ides of
March as the day of reckoning
with Uncle Sam's internal revenu-
ers.
Students whose home addresses
are not in Ann Arbor should for-
ward their income tax forms to
the district offices for their homes,
according to Ann .Arbor's Internal
Revenue Collector.
The process has been simplified
this year with short form 1040 on
which the taxpayer writes a few
figures corresponding to his earn-
ings and exemptions.
Students and their parents ben-
efit this year from an innovation
in the tax laws that allows both
the student and the parent to
claim the student as an exemp-
tion if the parent provides at least
half of the student's support.

ber of the executive board, Michi-
gan is helping six specific areas
through the gift plan.
The money will aid the educa-
tion center at Patzcuaro, Mexico,
a community center in Israel, and
an emergency program in Korea.
Aid will also go to the Gold Coast,
Middle East, and India. Money
will be used to help set up li-
braries all over the world.
"One of the advantages of the
gift coupon plan, says Mrs. Arvid
Andresen, chairman of the gift
coupon committee in Michigan, "is
that it establishes direct contact
with the donating organization
and the recipients.
"By acknowledging the gift, con-
tact is made for the groups and in-
dividuals," Mrs. Andresen contin-
ued.
Furnishes Specific Projec*
A further advantage of the gift
coupon plan is that it gives the
Council a specific project to carry
out.
According to Mrs. Andresen, one
of the most difficult problems of
the plan is organizing a way in
which people in all communities
.in Michigan may be reached.
The State Organization has also
participated in the International
Living Experiment. People in
Michigan communities pay the ex-
penses of men and women, to go
abroad, meet people in other coun-
tries, travel, and live with families.
Establish International Contact
When they return, they speak
to groups about their experiences
and establish further internation-
al contact.
The University Council for
UNESCO existed on campus until
a few years ago. Members of the
group graduated and interest
dropped.
Petitioning Begins
For Club Positions

A little-known photograph of
the first engineering building at
the University appearing in a his-
tory of the engineering college is
a reminder of what the campus
once was.
Named the mechanical labora-
tory, the plain, brick structure was
built in 1881 on the southeast cor-
ner of the campus. It was built
for $1,500 and equipped for $1,000
more.
Moved in 1887
On the first floor of the 24 by
36-foot building were a foundry,
forge shop and engine room. The
second floor housed pattern and
machine shops.
The laboratory stood until 1887,
when it was torn down to make
room for an expanding "new" en-
gineering building, the automotive
laboratory of today. Its bricks were
removed and the laboratory was
transported to the southwest cor-
ner of N. University and Observa-
tory. There it became a private
residence.
Although this first engineering
building was erected in 1881, engi-
neering classes began as early as
1854. The first classroom was the
laboratory of Prof. Mortimer Cool-
ey, second dean of the engineering
college. The recently-built Cooley
Bldg. on North Campus is named
after the second dean.
Calendar of Events
The photograph is from the col-
lection of Mrs. C. B. Green of Ann
Arbor who was associated with the
college from 1907-1942.
"A Century of Engineering Edu-
cation" is the title of the publica-
JGP LP Record
Students interested in ordering
the ten-inch LP record of the mu-
sical portion of the 1955 JGP must
place their order with payment
by noon tomorrow in the League
Undergraduate Office.
Michigan ranks first in the na-~
tion in the production of calcium-
magnesium chlorides, gypsum and .
salt.
Uof M
GILBERT & SULLIVAN
Society Presents
10LANTHE
April 13-16 8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn
Tickets at Admin. Bldg.
75c, 90c, and $1.25

tion now being circulated in which
the photograph appears. The pub-
lication was prepared in commem-
oration of the engineering college's
centennial celebration last year.
"A Century of Engineering Edu-
cation" includes a history of the
engineering college, the calendar
of events of the centennial con-
vocation, and a list of recipients
of citations. The names of all reci-
pients of honorary degrees award-'
ed since the founding of the De-
partment of Engineering in 1895
also appear.

I.

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
s "
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
Kwt: y

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loom*
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FILTER, TIP TAREYTON.
Gives 'You' True Tobacco Taste
And Real Filtration; Too!

MORRI LL'S
314 S. State Ph. NO 8-7177
Open Saturday 'til 5 P.M.

HIrL LEL announces
PASSOVER MEALS
April 11-14

CIGARETTES

/

TOWER HOTEL

Phone 2-45311

Reservations Required by April

1

THE SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY
presents its program
WJR 10:45 P.M. --Thursday, March 31
WWJ 10:45 P.M. - Friday, ApriI 1
WJR 6:15 P.M. - Saturday, April 2
For Peace and a Sane Society
VOTE SOCIALIST LABOR
(Paid Political Advertisement)

PRICE LIST

Special rate for all 7 meals..
Each lunch ..... ........
Each dinner . .............
(Sorry, no cancellationsc

I HiLLEL
Non- IEnclos
Members Members Passov
.$9.00 $12.00 I Q All
. 1.00 1.35 IEMr
. 1.85 2.40 1EJTu
I Name.
or refunds.) A
I Addres!
S

L, 1429 Hill, Ann Arbor, Mich.
ed is cash or check drown to "Hillet,
er" for $ to cover cost of:
7 meals p Tuesday dinner
onday lunch Q Wednesday lunch
nday dinner Wednesday dinner
esday lunch 'f Thursday lunch
SS Phone.

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