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March 31, 1955 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1955-03-31

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:

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1955

( I~

Board Fights
Prejudices
Educational Pressure
Applied to Problems
By BOB JONES
Prevention of racial and reli-
gious discrimination in the busi-
ness and social activities of Uni-
versity students is the aim of the
Anti-Discrimination Board.
Diana Hewitt, '55, a member of
the board, explained its purpose
and procedures.
Authorized by Student Legisla-
ture last Spring, the board uses
"educational persuasion" as a le-
ver, Miss Hewitt said. Action is
taken when complaints concerning
discrimination in the Ann Arbor
area are received from students.
Nine-Membcr Board
At present, the board is com-
posed of nine persons interested
in the discrimination problem. The
four community representatives
are Vice President of the Univer-
sity James A. Lewis; Bob Marshall
and Robert Maten, Ann Arbor
businessmen; and Thomas Harri-
son, a member of the Ann Arbor
Civic Forum. The other five mem-
bers are SL appointed students.
When a complaint of discrimi-
nation is received from a student,
the board goes into action, Miss
Hewitt explained.
Reliable Witnesses
The situation which caused the
complaint is set up again in the
establishment where it happened.
The board makes sure reliable wit-
nesses are at hand. This assures
both parties of fair play.
If the complained actionre-
curs, the members of the board
question the person involved. They
ask him why he has the discrim-
ination policy. Reasons given vary
greatly.
Talk "Out"
Board members try to talk him
out of continuing the policy. Other
Ann Arbor businessmen and stu-
dents are asked to talk to him as
well. A steady educational pres-
sure is applied.
Since November of 1954, the
board has handled six or seven
complaints, Miss Hewitt said. ,
The board is under no auspices1
since the demise of SL, but hopes
to be incorporated into SGC. It
was given a go-ahead from the
SGC Steering Committee.

WEEKEND JAUNT:

Aeronautical Engineers
Tour Connecticut Factory

A;
s

By GAIL GOLDSTEIN
Students in the aeronautical
engineering department did their
homework in an unusual way last
weekend.
Thirty-five students and faculty
members were guests of Pratt and
Whitney Aircraft, a division of the
United Aircraft Corporation in
East Hartford, Conn.
On a trip entirely free of charge,
participants were picked up at 6
p.m. Sunday at Willow Run by a
twin engine plane and arrived by
8:10 p.m. at Rentschler Field, a
United Aircraft's airport.
Main Plant
From there the students went
to the Statler Hotel. Monday
morning the students and faculty
members went to the main plant
of Pratt and Whitney where a
meeting was held describing the
functions, problems, and facilities
of the plant.
Frank Powers of the plant's en-
gineering department was host to
the guests and Frank Sprogell,
'39E, spoke to them on the plant's
functions.
From there the students went on
a tour of the production, assembly,
experimental testing areas of the
plant. Three groups were set up,
according to interest, in aerody-
namics, combustion, and propul-
sion.
Test department engineers dis-
cussed the area with the students
relating the plant's problems to
their interests.
Testing Plant
After lunch the guests went to
Willgoos Turbine Laboratory, a
twenty million dollar Pratt and
Whitney investment. Here all the
tests necessary to get an engine
into production are carried out.
Engines such as turbo jets, ram
jets, and turbo prop are tested.
"We were able to see exactly
how and where each part of an
engine fits," Richard Phillips, '56E,
said. "We also were able to freely
question the guide about any point
that we didn't understand or want-
ed to know more about."
Four Phases
Students in the field of aero-
nautical engineering take up four

HEFLIN
Pntby
TECHNICOLOR
costarring
ANNE BANCROFT
also
PETE SMITH
CARTOON
NEWS

phases including propulsion, aero-
dynamics, structures and the me-
chanics of flight.
Phillips pointed out that dur-
ing the trip it was possible to gain
much information that would be
helpful in classroom study.
Accompanying the students were
Prof. Wilbur C. Nelson, chairman
of the aeronautical engineering de-
partment, Prof. James E. Broad-
well, Prof. John R. Sellars, and
Prof. David J. Perry of the aero-
nautical engineering department
as well as Prof. Frank L. Schwartz
and Prof. Herbert H. Alvord of
the mechanical engineering de-
partment.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the Uni-
versity. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on saturday.) Notice of
lectures, concerts and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1955
Vol. LXV, No. 17
Notices
Regents' Meeting. FI., April 15. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than April 7.
Payments for board and room for the
second half of the spring semester are
to be made in all League Houses by
Mon., April 11.
Library Hours During Spring Recess.
From Fri., April 1, through Sat., April
9, the General Library will be open
week-days from 8:00 a.m, to 6:00 p.m.
The two study halls in the building
and Angell Hall Study Hall will be1
open 10:00 a.m.-12:00m., 2:00-4:00 p.m.;
Mon. through Fri.; and 10:00 a.m.-
12m. Sat. The graduate Reading Rooms
will be open from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00m.
and from 1:00 - 5:00 p.m., except on
Saturdays when they will close at
12:00m. Library Science Library will be
open 1:30-5:00 p.m. Mon. through Fri.,
April 4-8, closed mornings and Sat-
urdays. There will be no Sunday serv-
ice on April 3 and 10.
The Divisional Libraries will be closed
on both Saturdays within the vacation
period and will be open on short sched-
ules, i.e., 10:00 a.m.-12:00m. and 2:00-
4:00 p.m. Mon. through Fri. Excep-
tions are: East and West Engineering
Libraries open 9:00 a.m.-12:O0m. and
2:00-5:00 p.m. Mon. through Fri.; Bu-
reau of Government Library open 9:00
a.m.-12:00m. and 1:00-4:00 p.m. daily,
Mon. through Fri. Mathematics-Eco-
nomics Library open 9:00-12 :0m and
2:00-5:00 p.m. Mon. through Fri.; the
Physics Library open Mon. through
Fri. 9:00 a.m.-12:00m.; Fine Arts Read-
ing Room open from 1:00-5:00 p.m.;
Mon. through Fri.; Museums Library
open 10:00-12:00m. Mon. through Fri.;
Music Library open from 10:00 a.m.-
12:00m. and 1:00-3:00 p.m.; Social Sci-
ence Library 8:00 a.m.-12:0m. Mon.
through Fri.; Natural Science and Nat-
ural Resources 8:00 a.m.-12 :0m. Mon.
thruogh Fri.
Schedules will be posted on the doors
of the Divisional Libraries, and infor-
mation regarding library service during
the vacation may be obtained by tele-
phoning the Director's Office, Ext. 652.
June Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
The Teacher's Oath will be administer-
ed to all June candidates for the teach-
er's, certificate during the week of
(Continued on Page 4)

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Brown wallet. Vicinity State
Theatre. Reward. Phone NO 3-3906.
)90A
LOST-Gold Necklace. Description; thin
gold chain with blue stone. Call 308
Mosher Hall. )91A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-- 6.88. Sox.
39c, shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
SWEATERS to formals, size 9 to 11.
Call NO 3-8153. )301B
Check These Prices!-
You can now afford to get
into the "Big Car" class,
New 1955 Dodge
2-dr. Club Sedan
including heater, turn signals,
License and Taxes
Prices Start at
$1,900
A little bit down and
payments of
$15.31 a week
or we will take your old car
in trade - AT

PERSONAL
SMALL CHILD for day care in licensed
home. NO 3-5830. )78F
GRADS-Tired of it all, but stuck with
it? Serious, attractive grad, thirtyish,
is too. Seeks study dates. Write Box
20. )77F
DON'T MISS OUT. Call Student Per-
iodical Agency. NO 2-3061. )79F
TRANSPORTATION
FLORIDA-Riders wanted, share ex-
penses. Call NO 5-3393. Leaving April
1 at noon. )51G
HELP WANTED
FEMALE HELP WANTED-Two capable
cooks for National Music Camp in
units serving 400. Excellent working
and housing facilities and good pay'
to qualified persons. June 24-August
22. J. W. Turner, Dir. Food Service,
923 Citrus Ave., Sarasota, Fla. )46H
MALE HELP WANTED-Head baker and
baker's helper for National Music
Camp in unit serving 1200. Must be
well qualified in college dorm type
of food service. Excellent working
and housing facilities and good pay
to qualified persons. June 20-Aug-
ust 29. J. W. Turner, Dir. Food Ser-
vice, 923 Citrus Ave., Sarasota, Fla.
)47H
WANTED:, Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Good Salary, early morning
hours, available now and for sum-
mer. Call The Michigan Daily. Cir-
culation Dept. NO 2-3241. )49H
RELIABLE male student to clean rooms
and supervise children in return for
meals. Call NO 2-6422, Mr. Wentz. )50H
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING, Editing Manuscripts, Paperq
Theses. 831 Tappan Court, NO 3-0708
)301
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments. Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
RAD1IO - PHONO - TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )28I
TYPING-Thesis, Term Papers, etc.
Reasonable Rates Prompt Service, 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )1J
HELD OVER
THROUGH SATURDAY!
ALL THE GUYS
r ALL THE GnLS...ALu RTE
GLORY OF
"aflhi

USED CARS
1950 NASH, two-aoor, heater, good
paint, good tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)283B
1947 CHEVROLET four-door, good tires,
radio and heater, good transporta-
tion. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )282B
1951 STANDARD CHEVROLET. Four-
door, black, real nice. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )11N
1950 HUDSON, Two-door. New motor.
Radio and heater. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)14N
1948 CHEVROLET two-door. Radio and
heater. One owner. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)9N
Low Priced Cars
FOR STUDENT TRANSPORTATION
1948 Chevrolet Convertible white
side walls, excellent condition,
$350.
1949 Plymouth, 4 door, Gray, one
owner car, $395.
1941 Ford Tudor, $99.
1951 Chevrolet, 4 door, Powerglide,
$695.

USED CARS
1950 OLDS, 2 dr. sedan, radio, heater,
Hydramatic, new seat covers, special
price this week, $375.
1950 FORD 4 dr. sedan, radio, heater,
$275.
1937 DeSOTO 4 dr. Sedan, good running
condition, $125.
AL GROSS
Ford Sales, Inc. Dexter, Mich.
Call Dexter HA 6-4411 or HA 6-5441
for evening appointments. )N
BARGA IN
1951 Ford 2 dr., radio ,and heater,
8 cyl., $495.
PALMER MOTOR SALES
Your Ford Dealer in Chelsea
GReenwood 5-4911 )12N
1950 CHEVROLET Sedan, radio and
heater, $425.
1936 FORD, A-1, $75.
Fitzgerald Jordan, Inc.

A

607 Detroit Street

NO 8-8141
)14N

PONTIAC-late 1949. Hydramatic, radio
heater. One owner. Car in good con-
dition. Give offer. NO 3-5224. )15N
VACATION SPECIAL-1951 Ford Tu-
dor. Good condition. Must sell fast-
$350. Phone NO 2-0286 after 6 p.m.
)13N
Read and Use
Daily Class ieds

Doug Gregory
Your Saline Ford Dealer
Ph. Saline 301 or 302
Open Evenings 'til 9.

I

)6N

Benz Motors,

Inc.

"Your Dodge-Plymouth Dealer"

331 S. 4th Ave.

NO 2-5523
)322B

Any Lady With Gentleman Escort
Always Eats for One-Half Price
at
The HOME of GOOD FOOD
928 South State Street
When you care enough to eat the Very Best.
PHONE NO 8-9717

Institute of Arts Schedules
Art Lecture, Exhibits in Detroit

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

The Detroit Institute of Arts willv
have a variety of events to offer
for students vacationing in Detroit.
A lecture on Siennese art, con-

air

STARTING FRIDAY

I I

ORPHEUM
COMING - APRIL 15TH
"This is
terrific!
'.A treat for
all ages and
both sexes!"
-Daily News
GINA LOLLOBRIGIDA
"BREAD,
.aDREAl MS n

centrating on the religious panels
of the 15th century painter Sas-
setta, will be given at 8 p.m. April
5 in the Institute Lecture Hall.
The speaker, John Pope-Hen-
nessy, is a specialistnin the field
and is now serving as guest lectur-
er at Yale.
The Institute's gallery history of
art at 8 p.m. April 6 will cover
"Impressionism and the Parisian
Scene." This is the third of four
meetings dealing with 19th cen-
tury art in Europe and America.
Institute exhibits will include a
collection of early American Jew-
ish silver and portraits and an ex-
hibition of modern sculpture. The
silver and portrait display opens
April 6 in honor of the American
Jewish Tercentenary.
The exhibition of twenty-one
American and European sculptors
opening April 5 is the annual show
of "The Friends of Modern Art."
Artists represented will include
Alexander Calder, Jacques Lip-
chitz, William Zorach, David Hare,
Henry Moore, Matisse and Picasso.
A million tourists yearly visit
the Cascades in Sparks Foundation
County Park, Jackson. The water-
falls extend 500 feet, and drop 64
feet in 11 falls. At night, over
1000 magical colored lights flood-
light the falls and spouting foun-
tains.

YOU'LL FIND the smartest costume
jewelry in town by walking a few
extra steps to
VAN DYKE'S GIFTS
215 E. Liberty NO 3-1319 )323B
LAWSON SOFA-Black naugahyde, foam
rubber cushions, ideal for study or
recreation room-Like new. Phone
NO 8-9086. )324B
EASTER SPECIAL-25 gallon stainless
steel aquarium $11. Wrought iron
stand for a 25 gallon $8.50. For the
largest selection of tropical fish aand
aquariums in Michigan visit Art Class
Novelty Company. 496 Main Street,
Dundee, Michigan. Open daily and
Sunday. )325B
FOR RENT
WANTED-Male to share campus apt.
with 3 college men. Call NO 3-2038.
) 29C
ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE DOUBLE ROOM, large closet kit-
chen privileges optional. No drinkers
or smokers. For quiet gentlemen.
Near State and Packard-Phone NO
8-8345. )50D
STUDIO APARTMENT for 1 or 2 in
Burns Park Area. Semi-private bath
Phone NO 2-3541. )68D
Rooms for Men
Clean and pleasant, near the Uni-
versity and all the best eating places.
Parking facilities. 1412 Cambridge.
Call NO 8-7683. )63D
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH. Campus Tour-
ist Homes. 518 E. William. Student
rooms also available. NO 3-8454. )66D
Completely Modern
Log Housekeeping cottages on beau-
tiful Torch Lake. Special rates
to honeymooners. Phone Plymouth
1-225 W. )67D

b

4 =f Restaurant and Pizzeria
PIZZA IS OUR SPECIALTY
1204 South University
10:30 A.M. to 11 P.M. Closed Saturdays
OPEN DURING SPRING VACATION

6

STARTING MONDAY
APRIL 18TH FOR
ONE FULL WEEK
S. HROK
presents A
VERDI'S
COMING SOON
"UGETSU'

FINAL WEEK of the Season
$X1
by Mean-Paul Sartre
WED. -THURS. -FRI. -SAT.
8:15 P.M.
SUNDAY MAT IN EE 2:30, P.M.
Student Rate 99e
General Admission $1.65
Please Make Reservations Early
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
NO 2-5915 327 So. Fourth

{

I WARNER BROS. PRESENT r IN
CINEMASCOP
WARNERCOLOR-STEREOPHOIC SOUND
STARRING
VAN ALDO MONA
HEFLIN- RAY- FREEMAN Y
NANCY JAMES RAYMOND
MON WWITMORE-MASSEY

I

I

E

TONIGHT AT 8
Department of Speech and
Program of Physical Education., for Women
Present
3rd Lab. Playbi
Pirandello's
SICILIANLIMES
Marvin Felheim's
THEY WHO WAIT
Dance Drama
WHY CHINESE BOYS
HAVE SHORT NAMES
T lfl T fi ~ w To Ao

I

' 1

11

RIDDEN
BY THE -.
TERROR
OF THE W
TOMAAK!

1-

I

I

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