100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 27, 1955 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sundov Anrrh 27 1958

Ju u y, i tk, , 1
MEXICAN HOLIDAY-THHAIL:7
SHigh Level Swiss Resort
Work Camp Project Discussec
By DONNA HANSON
live on a strict budget. Transpor- young Mexican doctor from the
',ENE DAY while emptying a fation to Mexico was very inexpen- University of Mexico.
friend's wastebasket, I found si because a small group of the Tepetlixpa wss one of exic
an application blank for the Amer- vsunteers obtaini d a car for a poorest toowus, even according toa
lcan Friends Service Commt e " DU'oit dealer sd delivered it to Mexican sIandards. Main "indu -
This is vhat started Lairy Tasa. try" in the tosn -vas flowers a
ebter. '7. n a nine-s k coyok liom Texai, Miss Webber and fruit. Ecc the average wa
coo stty i Mei co. Th t' prCectthe seven otheru ivmbcisof her for the mi sas only one dollar
Was nsoid by ,he AFSC swekh ic nr jounyyd to M Br, in t to suppot tt
does soc; Isworm in domestic and on an ancient M!xiran bus. They average familycof fve children, t
forildn n nct ri rn usri ses_ tniyaf I'id
arrived in Mexico City two day, wrvk campess attempted to begi
The work camp idea originated early "in order to enjoy some typ- a new i.duvry by helping plar
i Pennsylvania in 1934 where the ical touristing." lemon tres. "Probably our niot
AFSC campers worked in a coal On the upoinird day, the lt proninent wk, though, was dg
miners' community. Since then, workea;rscc gathered and were ing 'Iitrines for the various Itaca
the program has spread all over transported to Cuernavaca for a ican families," Miss Webber co
the United Stat s, Asia and Eu- four-day orientation conference. meiuted.
rope "Many of the campers thought-
By working together on some they seie heic to do tings for thi SLATIONSHIPS between the
service needed by a community, Mexicans. Leaders pointed out to Mexicans and the campe
the work campers are able to ob- the campers that this was a side were "difficult because the moie
tain a better understanding of by side proposition with the Mex- diifered. No matter what our job
people of different backgrounds. icans with no philanthropy to be was, digging or teaching, all giils
They have the opportunity to ex- shown. They also taught those swore shirts and blouses wcitla
change ideas with these people, workers who didn't know Spanish. sleeves - never jeans and heaven
and work together with them for and that was most of thei.h forbid shorts.'
harmonious solutions to problems various gestures, phrases and As for results campers derived --Cortesy oc C. Bradt, Asa, switzer'n
encountered . words they would have to know." from working in such a setup,
The group of 250 campers were "most felt here was a chance ta AOSA, 6,000 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL. IS LOCATED
N THE work camps in Mexico, then divided into groups of 20 and avoid academic pressures and es- IN THE GRISONS, SWITZERLAND
the volunteers intend to help sent to 10 camps spread through- cape. in physical labor. This
improve the 'ealth and standards out Mexico. Miss Webber was sent couldn't be done, however, with SUN TO DEATH VALLEY:
of the Mexican people. to Tepetlixpa where they set up the group of 20 different individ-
Interested in gring abroad, Miss their work camp headed by a lead- uals who had to think and talk
Webber applied for a position in er and an assistant leader. about it.sW
France for a year's work, but "e- f'If was a simmer of resliing W estern Stat es Provide
ceived an acceptance for a year's IN EACH of the camps, work dif- one's limitations in so many ways. V
work in Mexico instead," she ex- fered. Miss Webber's group There were the frustrations of not n Of Scen ic T heme w so a c l
Ilained. worked citha a subsidiary part of being able to aetisate all The fcel--_________________
the Mexican government for whom ings enjoyed. The co-workcamp- FROM Sun Valley to Death Val-
FOLLOWING h e r acceptance, they innoculated the entire town ers, our Mexican friends, and Icy naey d mah Vt- THE austere faces of four of
Miss Webber received litera- for chicken pox. The campers also above all the children were 'high- America's Presidents are carv-
ture from the AFSC to prepare her taught townspeople and their chil- lights' of the summer. It is al- gether provided a variety of rec-
for her coming trip. Because the dren manual arts, English, some ways the people who matter in reational snd scenic attractions in ed out of the solid rock of Mount
cost of her trip would be $200, Miss health measures and introduced this type of project, and one real- the American West. Rushmore in the Black Bills of
Webber, as well as most of the oth- them to types of recreation. They izes the work is only of secondary Even summer tourists can ice South Dakota. The looking is free,
er 250 Mexican campers, had to worked under the direction of a importance." skate in an open-air rink, at the and the accommodations are
same time warmed by the sun
--- - hat gives the Idaho valley its many.
name. The North American con- Giant sequoia trees of California
tinent takes its lowest dip, some are so large that dogged engineers
280 ft. below sea level, at another have cut roads through rather
place where tourist facilities than around them. Said to be
abound-California's Death Val- among the oldest of living things,
ley. the trees dwarf their surroundings
Yellowstone's Old Faithful gey- into insignificance.
AY 5, 6, 7, 8 1955 ser has been shooting water out of California tourists often delight
the ground every hour ever since in catching grunion fish from the
the Indians came, looked and Pacific Ocean. The lively creatures
wondered. It, and other natural flop onto the beaches, and they
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS spectacles of Yellowstone, attract can be caught barehanded, an ex-
thousands of current-day tourists perience unique to the American
LOIS MARSHALL, Soprano SOL SCHOENBACH, Bassoon every year. West.
RISE STEVENS. Mezzo-soorano MASON JONES_ Hnr

n ,e1TGN, mz aprn mla[ c, morn
NELL RANKIN, Mezzo-soprano GRANT JOHANNESEN, Pianist
LESLIE CHABAY, Tenor RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist
WILLIAM WARFIELD, Baritone EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
MORLEY MEREDITH, Baritone THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor
JEANNE MITCHELL, Violinist MARGUERITE HOOD, Youth Chorus Conductor
JOHN deLANCIE, Oboe UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ANTHONY GIGLIOTTI, Clarinet FESTIVAL YOUTH CHORUS
PROGRAMS

THURSDAY, MAY 5, 8:30 P.M.
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor
Rudolf Serkin, Painist
Prelude and Fugue in C Minor . . . . oBach
(transcribed for orchestra by Eugene Ormandy)
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 . . Beethoven
Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83,
for Piano and Orchestra ... . Brahms
Rudolf Serkin
FRIDAY, MAY 6, 8:30 P.M.
Thor Johnson, Guest Conductor
Uivsersity Choral Union
Lois Marshall, Soprano
Nell Rankin, Mezzo-soprano
Leslie Chabay, Tenor
Morley Meredith, Baritone
Missa Solemnis in D major, Op. 123 . , Beethoven
University Choral Union and Soloists
SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2:30 P.M.
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor
Jeanne Mitchell, Violinist
Festival Youth Chorus
Marguerite Hood, Conductor
Overture, "Donna Diana". . . Reznicek
Sinfonia Concertante in E-fiat major,
K. 297b.. ..... Mozart
John deLance, oboe; Anthony Gigliotti, clarinet;
Sol Schoenbach, bassoon; and Mason Jones, horn
Viennese Folk and Art Sngs
Feotival Yo th Chorus
Symphony No 8 in B minor (Unfimshed) . Schubert
Concerto No, 5 in A major . . . . . Mozart
Jeanne Mitchell

SATURDAY, MAY 7, 8:30 P.M.
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor
William Warfield, Baritone
Overture and Allegro from LaSultane . Couperin
(arr. for orchestra by Darius Milhaud)
"Thy Glorious Deeds" from Samson . . Handel
Two songs from "Vier Ernste Gecange" . Brahms
Wiiiiam Warfieid
Epigraph... . . . . . . Dello Jolo
Five Old American Songs . . . . . . Arr. Copland
Mr. Warfield
Concerto for Orchestra. . . . . . . Bartok
SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2:30 P.M.
Thor Johnson, Guest Conductor
University Choral Union
Lois Mitchell, Soprano
Leslie Chabay, Tenor
Morley Meredith, Baritone
Grant Johannesen, Pianist
"Carmina Burana" . Carl Orff
University Choral Union and Soloists
Concerto No. 3 in C molarme.e. . . Prokofiev
Grant Johanesen
SUNDAY, MAY 8, 8:30 P.M.
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor
Rise Stevens, Mezzo-soprano
Concerto Grosso No. 2 for String Orchestra . Bloch
"Gods of Eternal Night," from Alceste . . Gluck
(English text by John Gutman)
Adieu, forets," from Jeanne d'Arc . TchaIkovsky
Rise Seens
"Mon coeur," from Samson et Dalila . Saint-Saens
Habanera from Carmen . . . . . . . Bizet
Seguidilia from Carmen . . . . . . . Bizet
Miss Stevens
Symphony No. 4 in F minor . . . Tchaikovsky

I'

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD S
A BOON FOR TRAVELEIS ...
and All Wives 11hIo Dread Ironinug
N y F~

i
,

is

I ............ - - ----------- --------- --- ------------- -

-
trh
N
ho
ni
1
as
vs
w i
b3
Er
del
ti
fr
$
sc
se
st
sh

OUR DACRON AND EGYPTIAN COTTON
BROADCLOTH SHIRT
NEEDS NO IRONING
A finer broadcloth shirt that combines the absorption
qualities of Cotton with the easy laundering, quick
drying magic of Dacron. The luxury shirt that
stays fresh all day.
SPECIALLY PRICED , .8.95
J {i'
Mail Orders Filled Promptly
add 3% tax
ILDS
STATE STREET ON THE CAMPUS
".1 ::!;":4V.4"J::.;"JJ!.V .:"{!:::"1::.}!Yt..} "! .}""": t.L.;}'J.":!:.} ;. tS.K.sCC1

SiNGLE CONCERTS : $3.00 - $2.50 - $2.00- $1.50
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC SYMPHONY . . (2:30 P.M.) Sunday, May 22
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
Tickets and information at University Musical Society, Burton Memorial Tower

iii

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan