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March 13, 1955 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MARCH 2A, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE REWPM

SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY P A i~U! EPWV

X f%"JP or, v Gib

41

SECOND WOMAN SL VEEP:
'Machine-Like' Ross ner Ends Career

By DAVE BAAD
"Ruth is just like a machine, al-
ways working and always there
when SL needs her."
To some who have observed
Ruth Rossner's attachment to Stu-
dent Legislature and student gov-
ernment in general, this seemed an
apt appraisal of her fine work over
the past three and a half years.
From the time she was first
elected to the Legislature in April,
1953, until she arose to adjourn
SL's final meeting last Wednesday
her diligence in working fo stu-
dent government has been seldom
surpassed.
Holds Many Positions
In two years she advanced
through various positions includ-
ing SL recording secretary, mem-
ber at large, Student Affairs Com-
mittee representative, D e v e 1 o p -
ment Council representative and
last December became only the
second woman -n SL history to be
elected vice-president. The other
was Adele Hager, '49, elected in
1949.
However, close attachment to
student government is only part
of Miss Rossner and she dislikes
being so closely associated with SL
as to be termed a machine.
Anxious For Free Time
When her student government
responsibilities are over March 16,
she can't wait to start attending a
few concerts and plays and begin
going to all the sports events
again.
Although her avid sports inter-
est hasn't been overly evident
since her University days began,
Miss Rossner was once assistant
sports editor of her high school
paper and played basketball and
field hockey with her high school
team.
Movies have been her favorite
entertainment at college and she
seldom' misses Hollywood produc-
tions passing through Ann Ar-
bor. Like some other campus lead-
ers have mentioned recently she
wants to write a few movie reviews
for The Daily before she leaves
Michigan.
Always prominent in high school
activities, Miss Rossner couldn't
make up her mind between. The
Daily and Student Legislature
when she first entered the Univer-
sity.
Tries "Something Different"
"I had worked on our high
school paper so I decided to try
something different and ran for
Student Legislature. Even after I
Joined SL I kept thinking I would
go to The Daily and at least give
it a try.
"About this time I was made

-Daily-Lynn Wallas
RUTH ROSSNER
... terminates dilligent SL career

40 Students
Keep Guild
Life Active
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
in a series of articles on Lane Hall
Student Religious Association spon-
sored Student religious organizations.)
By CAROL PRINS
The Roger Williams Guild of
the First Baptist Church of Ann
Arbor is a student organization of
approximately forty members.
Glen Howell, '55E, president of
the student organization, said the
group is close-knit and many ac-
tivities of the Guild are participat-
ed in by All the members.
He said that among the educa-
tional activities of the group are
the weekly Bible study groups and
small discussion groups which are
called Yoke Fellowship groups.
Sponsors Weekly Party
The Guild sponsors a weekly Fri-
day night party which is usually
an open house or a type of organ-
ized party, and another social
function of the group is a weekly
tea designed to bring members to-
gether during the week.
The Guild articipates in the
Intramural sports program as well
as sponsoring educational and so-
cial meetings.
In cooperation with the Lane
Hall Student Religious Organiza-
tion, the Guild, along with many
other student religious groups,
participates in a "Work Weekend"
designed to clean up sections of
Ann Arbor in need of painting and
cleaning. The group has planned
"Work Weekends" for sections of
Chicago and Toledo this spring.
Spring Retreat Planned
The Inter-Guild, another group
in which the Roger Williams Guild
participates and which is a com-
bination of all Protestant student
religious groups on campus is
planning a Spring retreat for In-
ter-Guild members in the spring.
"The aims of our group are pri-
marily to provide a Christian at-
mosphere for social functions, ed-
ucational and education needs,"
Howell said.
Other club officers are Fern
Woodard, '56, vice-president; Vir-
ginia Lund, '55Ed, secretary; and
Robert Stenger, treasurer. Advisor
of the group is the Rev. Chester H.
Loucks, pastor of the First Bap-
tist Church.
UMW Hits Policy
WASHINGTON (P)-The United
Mine Workers Union said yester-
day the President's Committee on
Fuel Resources policy had failed
to "meet squarely the' realities" of
problems facing the coal industry.

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
EVEN A BABY'S ENTITLED TO ENTER THE DERBY
(Continued from Page 1) 1

Colorful Cars.Delight Derby Spectators

head of the new SL administrative
wing and this kept me tied to the,
Legislature for good, although a
little more attention to my studies
wouldn't have hurt either," Miss
Rossner reflected.
She has never regretted stick-
ing with SL. "Student government
places you in situations that condi-
tion you for the rest of your life."
The best thing that ever hap-
pened to her was losing her first!
Legislature race. "I considered sui-
cide but instead I ran the next
spring and was elected on the first
ballot.
"This was the greatest thrill I
Kite Records
Several enthusiastic Univer-
sity kite-fliers yesterday set a.
new record in the favorite
March sport.
Breaking the 2,000 - foot
m a r k e r established several
weeks ago by two Sigma Nu
men, seven Medical students
sent their 15-cent stock kite
soaring 3,940 feet above Mich-
igan Stadium.
The students, all members
of Alpha Kappa Kappa, medi-
cal fraternity, claimed their
success lay in the use of 25-
pound test nylon cord and a,
17-foot terrycloth tail.

have received at the University, for
it proved I could overcome defeat.
When I went to bed at 10 a.m. the
next day I still didn't feel the least
bit tired."
Little ofste bitterness evident
in many senior campus leaders
shows up in truth's thinking.
Favors Criticism
She is primarily worried that
many students at the University as.
well as administrators have for-
gotten what criticism is. "Criti-
cism is not synonomous with de-
struction and student government
by its very nature should be criti-
cal."
Although Miss Rossner thinks
SGC's small elected body will prove
detrimental in a representative
sense, she isn't dooming the new
student government to failure.
Likes Last Legislature
She provided an optimistic note
by terming the group sitting on the
last Legislature one of the best
since she became a member. "One
of my biggest regrets over SL's de-
mise was that so many promising
sophomores and freshmen were
having their Legislature terms go
relatively to waste."
Although she has many "beauti-
ful" recommendations behind her
in case she wants to go to work
Liter graduation, present plans
call for a four month trip to Eu-
rope.

lined up the cars at the starting
platform and kept the racers go-
ing.
Part of the Union and Wom-
en's Athletic Association's Spring
Weekend project, the Derby was
another activity of a fun-packed

weekend that began Friday night
with Skit Night in Hill Auditorium.
Judges for the derby included
Prof. Marvin J. Eisenberg of the
tne arts department, Prof. George
A. Peek of the political science de-
partment and Ron Fidler, instruc-
tor in design.

Third Attempt Finally Puts
Charter Revision on Ballot

--Daily-Dick Gaskill
BETA THETA PI'S BEER CAN (OR BARREL?)
SENIORS
CIVIL ENGINEERING
We are an old, well established firm of steel work-
ers who fabricate and erect structural steel and
miscellaneous iron.
Personnelwise, however, we are young and have
young ideas.
The firm is growing rapidly and has great future
growth potential.
We Need Trained Personnel for
Estimating, Design, and Sales
If you are interested in structural steel and would
like to be associated with a highly respected yet
smaller firm (150 employees) and grow with
it ...S
'Send a complete resume with picture to
WILLIAM W. MOYER
501 Front Ave. -- Grand Rapids, Mich.

(Continued from Page 1)

quested information from towns
the size of Ann Arbor containing
Universities. All ideas, however,
were "tailored to fit Ann Arbor,"
he said.
Subcommittees of the commis-
sion would talk over its ideas, and
Sidwell would draft a section em-
bodying the decisions reached.
After over a year of study the
commission was able to assemble
and publish its tentative conclu-
sions. In September of last year
they again consulted with city offi-
cials and explained what the com-
mission had done. They asked how
the new charter would operate in
individual departments and got
appraisals of the revised document.
More study was given the find-
ings, and public hearings on the

tentative conclusions were held in
December and January.
"We had pretty much made up
our minds as to what we were go-
ing to do," Quimet said. However
several minor changes were made
to make the charter more palat-
able to all segments of the popu-
lation.
The three law school professors
formed a drafting committee un-
der the chairmanship of Dean
Stason.The committee worked in-
tensively in the last few months,
making some 300 corrections in
for mand punctuation.
By the end of January, the char-
ter was completed. It was sent to
Lansing for approval by the gover-
nor and the attorney general. Aft-
e ra few technical changes needed
to conform to state law, the char-
ter was ready to present to the
voters.

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

ote

for CO

0

SE

SE

P

RTY

Candidates-
9 BOB LEACOCK
* JANET NEARY
. DONNA NETZER

THE UNIVERSITY MUST PROMOTE AN ATMOS-
PHERE IN WHICH STUDENTS HAVE THE OPPOR-
TUNITY TO MEET AND LIVE WITH OTHER STU-
DENTS OF DIFFERENT RACES, RELIGIONS, AND
NATIONAL BACKGROUNDS. This contact on an
equal basis is the best means of alleviating the
misunderstandings that exist among people, and is
a significant part of the educational experience.
THEREFORE, THE CSP PLATFORM STATES:
We believe that no racial, religious, or ethnic con-
siderations should be used in placing students in Uni-
versity housing units, except on the request of the in-
dividual student (CSP has already instigated some

changes on University housing applications to imple-
ment this policy.)
We do not believe that the need for new housing is an
excuse for allowing new groups with discriminatory
clauses to be established on campus.
The need for new housing could be solved by the
establishment on campus of fraternities and sorori-
ties without discriminatory clauses. The problem
could also be alleviated by allowing more students
to live in off-campus housing, and by the utilization
of more private homes as University residences for
men and women.

Candidates
Candidates-
" BOB LEACOCK
. JANET NEARY
" DONNA NETZER

Vote
cSP

A mutual interest in responsible student government led to the form-
ing of the Common Sense Party, a student political party organized to
promote its goals through united efforts. CSP offers candidates who
are pledged to a practical platform. If elected, they must work together
for the achievement of these specific objectives.

Vote
cSP

IT IS THE UNIVERSITY'S RESPONSIBILITY TO
PROMOTE THE FREE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS AND
THE INDIlVIDUAL'S OPPORTUNITY TO DISCOVER
HIS OWN TRUTHS. To this end, it must make avail-
able to students all points of view, and must resist
those pressures that insist the unorthodox must not
be heard. It must .allow students and faculty their
rights as citizens, so long as they do not claim to
represent the University in their activities.
CSP believes that these principles are vital to the
meaningful existence of the University and must be

national unity is confused with national unanimity.
THEREFORE, THE CSP PLATFORM STATES:
We believe that political, economic and religious be-
liefs should not be criteria for the hiring and firing
of a faculty member, so long as he does not attempt
to influence others through his position as a teacher.
We believe that students should be free to hear any
speaker or speech of their choice.
OTHER CSP GOALS:
To seek extended closing hours in women's residences,

the student governmental groups within the housing
units
To improve. the position of the student judiciary so
that it will have more freedom and authority
To pressure for a "dead" weekend prior to the final
evamination period although this may exclude the
possibility of a "meaningful" commencement
To obtain a reappraisal of University regulations in
order to produce realistic and respected rules
To add a representative of the ISA (International

elected representative to maintain the balance be-
tween organizational and elected representatives
OUR GOALS CAN BE ACHIEVED BY AN INTELLI-
GENT HANDLING OF SGC SO THAT:
SGC consults with Ann Arbor, administration, faculty,
and student groups most concerned with desired
change.
SGC obtains complete factual infornation on which
to base a decision prior to making that decision.
SGC continually presses for realization of its view-
point, rather than allowing a single setback to deter

I!

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