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March 04, 1955 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-04

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PAGE TWO

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

FP.MAV. MARM A, 111AX

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY 1'PTflAV flffA~?E~U A IOEE

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STUDENTS...
Make Wahr's your headquarters
for College Books and supplies.
WAHR'S UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
316 South State Street

o

TONIGHT 8:15 - also Saturday and Sunday
"A PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT"
-Christopher Fry
"THE BOOR" Anton Chekhov
STUDENT RATE 99c GENERAL ADMISSION $1.65
Please make reservations early
- DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
NO 2-5915 327 S. Fourth

Discordances
In Economy
Noted in Talk
Inconsistencies resulting from
the complex components of our
modern economy were stressed by
Walter H. Hamilton, Washington,
D.C. attorney in his lecture "Sa-
lute to the Emerging Economy"
yesterday.
The talk concluded the eighth
series of William W. Cook lectures.
Hamilton said that the economy
had been built by the decisions of
hundreds of thousands of indi-
viduals, and as such is a mixture
which requires much more regula-
tory attention than is now given
it.
He said that sometimes a regu-
latory committee dismisses prob-
lems before satisfactory solutions
have been reached, and subse-
quently not enough attention is
paid to important details.
Emphasizing the improvements
that we have yet to make in our
technology, Hamilton said that
we should not feel that we have
reached the saturation point in
industrial perfection.

MORE BASIC COURSES:
Engineering School
To Revise Programs

By GAIL GOLDSTEIN
Program changes in the engi-
neering school are now being stu-
died due to the growing need for
additional engineers with educa-
tional backgrounds similar to
members of the medical profession.
Commenting on engineering edu-
cation during National Engineers'
Week, Dean George G. Brown of
Engineering School observed that
the complex demands of modern
technology, with its expanding
emphasis on applications of sci-
ence, calls for more men with a
sound background.
Need for Practitioners
"There is a tremendous need for
engineers as well as for medical'
doctors who are true practitioners,
able and willing to interpret new
scientific discoveries for the bene-
fit of their clients," he. said.
Dean Brown added that these
men require a background that
cannot be developed in four or
five years of a conventional engi-
neering program.
Instead the new Engineering
Science program would offer to

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NOW_ _ _ _ForProgram
Information
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IN COLOR AND
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students the opportunity to mas-
ter several basic engineering sci-
ences-such as mechanics, elec-
tricity, and thermodynamics that
are common to all fields of engi-
neering.
Similar to Medical School
This may be likened to the edu-
cational ,program of the medical
profession, Dean Brown said, dur-
ing which time doctors in training
study such basic areas as anatomy,
medicine, surgery, and pathology.
Designed to develop the crea-
tiveness and analytical power of
its students, the new program has
among its aims the development
of student versatility in the solu-
tion of engineering problems, ra-
ther than an emphasis on specific
"know-how" of present particular
industrial procedures. These fre-
quently become obsolete by the
time the student graduates.
Modern trends in engineering
are characterized by increasing
emphasis upon science. In setting
up the new Science Engineering
program in the engineering col-
lege, the school officials hope to
provide a program that will satis-
fy this trend.
Prof. Robert R. White of the
Chemical and Metallurgical En-
gineering department is in charge
of the program which is being
planned in recognition of the pre-
paration needed for post-graduate
work in engineering or applied sci-
ences as well as for immediate
employment in the expanding
fields of engineering research and
development.
New Background Work
With these facts in mind, the
Science Engineering program will
offer the students a background
in physical, chemical, and engi-
neering science as least equivalent
to that required in the post-gradu-
ate programs leading to the mas-
ter's degree in the different
branches ofengineering. The stu-
dent is not required to complete
the specialized engineering courses
required for the bachelor's degree
in other engineering programs.
Students will be encouraged to
formulate their own sequenc of
courses including a number of n-
tegrated courses covering an area
of particular interest to him with
the advice and approval of the
program advisor.
All students who are interested
in the Science Engineering pro-
gram may contact Dean George G.
Brown of Engineering School now
as only a limited number can be
enrolled in 1955.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 overage words to a tine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-CHI PHI fraternity pin on
Thompson between Liberty and
Monroe. Reward. NO 3-0521, Ext.
405. )76A
LOST-Surveyors leveling rod; make
K&E, 3 five feet sections, in vicinity
of Maynard and Williams. Reward.
Cal Univ. Ext. 2213 or Whitmore
Lake, Hickory 9-7431 after six. )75A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords--$6.88. Box,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store; 122 E. Washington. )26B
1948 DODGE two-door green, radio,
heater, new tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )245B
1948 CHEVROLET Club Coupe-radio,
heater, good tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)277B
1946 BUICK SEDAN. Radio. 1946 FORD
V-8 Sedan, good condition $150. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan, Inc. 607 Detroit St.
NO 8-8141. )286B
1951 FORD V-8, new tires, 26,000 miles.
The big iot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )281B
1950 NASH, two-door, heater, good
paint, good tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)283B
1947 CHEVROLET four-door, good tires,
radio and heater, good transporta-
tion. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )282B
FOR SALE-2 refrigerators, 6 and 20
cubic feet, also 2 gas ranges and
miscellaneous kitchen equipment.
Cheap. NO 2-8269, ask for Tim Rear-
don or NO 3-1511, Ext. 2534, ask for
Harold Wolfe. )284B
1948 DeSOTO 4 door Sedan, heater-
in excellent condition, $225. Call NO
3-8123. )289B
1951 CHEVROLET Delux Club Coupe.
R&H and Powerglide. Excellent
mechanical condition. $495. Call NO
3-2348. )290B
HEATH Ultra Linear Williamson $45.
78 RPM collection. 20 cents per Disc.
Phone NO 2-8777, 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.
)288B
FULLY EQUIPPED, light weight bicy-
cle, $39.95. Service on all makes of
bicycles. Kiddie Korner, corner of
Main and Madison.

FOR SALE
Purchase from Purchase
Keystone Olympic 8mm. Movie
Camera with f 1.9 lens, used, $75.
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University NO 3-6972
)287B
33-FT. MOBILE HOME. completely
modern, priced at little more than
a year's apartment rent. Call NO
3-1616, or may be seen at Lot 3,
Coachville. )292B
54 CHEVROLE' Station Wagon, must
go. 9400, call NO 3-2924. )291B
ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE DOUBLE ROOM, large closet kit-
chen privileges optional. No drinkers
or smokers. For quiet gentlemen.
Near State and Packard-Phone NO
8-8345. )50D
BY DAY, week, month, student rooms
also available. Campus Tourist Home,
51 E. William (near State) NO
3-8454. )62D
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED, excellent food,
no work, 927 Forest. Call NO 8-8400.
HELP WANTED
SALESMEN WANTED, Embroidered U.
of Michigan Jacket Insignia, Nord,
Box 92, Forest Hiils, N.Y. )40H
PERSONAL
$300. FIRST WEEK-$50 EVERY WEEK
-Two of us are putting ourselves
through school with this business.
You too can do this in only a few
hours a week. Free particulars. Stu-
dent Opportunities, 808 E. 13th, Uni-
versity of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon.
)64F
WANTED: for L.S.&A. Senior Class Veep
-FRED KEYWELL. (Paid political
advertisement). )66F
READ MAGAZINES? Ever know about
the $$$$ to be saved by subscribing
at our special rates? Student Per-
iodical, NO 2-3061. )65F
TRANSPORTATION
ANYONE desiring ride or to share ride
from Ypsilanti--Call Ypsi 3378M. )460
BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, uphtairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
Daily
Classifieds
Bring
Quick
Results

BUSINESS SERVICES
RADiO - PHONO - TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"tudent Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University. Phone NO 8-7942
1?' blocks east of East Eng. )281
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALTY
NO 2-7787
for 2-3 bedroom comes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20
ENDING TONIGHT
LULUr
BRENDA
0 it is, please
Stell Ruth to tell Irene "--"
to tell Pat to tell Miriam
to tell Betty to tell Mabel
to tell Lois to tell Pauline to
tell Josie to tell Margaret
to tell Shirley THAT everyone
should put on their laughing
Spants and shock absorbers
.,and see the diotous hit
that has the whole
country howlngl

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GRAND PRIZE WINNER OF THE
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"BRILLIANT"
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"RAVISHINGLY BEAUTI-
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"PACED to the HEARTBEAT
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Lawrence Harvey-Flora Robson
Susan Shentall

The Love Story of the
Beauty and the Barbarian!
Clash of Armies!
* Underwater spectacle!
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Saturday at 7 & 9
Sunday at 8 only
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
SHADOW OF A DOUBT
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HAYDN: Symphonies Nos. 88 and 93, Herman Scherchen & Vienna Sym.
BEETHOVEN: Three Sonatas: "Moonlight," "Pathetique," "Appassionat'"
Paul Badura-Skoda
BARTOK: Concertos Nos. 2 and 3, Edith Farnadi & Vienna Sym.
HOLST: The Planets, Sir Adrian Boult & London Sym.
MOZART: Requiem Mass, H. Scherchen & Vienna Chorus & Orch.
BEETHOVEN: "Archduke" Trio, Badura-Skoda, Fournier, Janigro
RAVEL: Bolero, La Valse, Valses nobles et Sentimentales, Alborada del
Gracioso, Pavane pour une infante defunte (Grand Prix du Disque
,Award)
SCHUBERT: "Trout Quintet, Badura-Skoda and Konzerthaus Quartet
HAYDN: Symphones Nos. 95 and 100 (Military) H. Scherchen and Vienna
Sym.
HANDEL: Messiah. Scherchen and London Phil. Orch. & Chorus (3 LPs)
BACH: Brandenburg Concerti, London Baroque Ensemble
SHOSTAKOVITCH: Symphony No. 1 and Age of Gold Ballet, Nat'l Sym.
FRANCK: D minor Symphony and Le Chasseur Maudit, Rodzinski and
Vienna Sym.
LISZT: Les Preludes, Battle of the Huns, Orpheus, and Mazeppa. Dixon
and London Phil.
BEETHOVEN: "Kreutzer" Sonata, Fournier and Doyen
MOZART: Concertos for Clarinet and Bassoon,"Rodzinski & Vienna Sym.
CHOPIN: Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, Badura-Skoda
TCHAIKOVSKY: Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, Farnadi
VIVALDI: Gloria CHARPENTI ER: Midnight Mass
TCHAIKOVSKY: Romeo and Juliet, Marche Slav, and 1812 Overture
Scherchen and London Sym.
SCARLATTI: Sonatas,, Valenti, Harpsichord
COPLAND: Appalachian Spring, Billy the Kid, El Salon Mexico, Mitchell
and National Sym. .
HANDEL: Concerti Grossi, Scherchen & English Baroque ensemble
VIVALDI : 4 Concerti
BACH : Cantata No. 140, Sleepers Awake, Can. No. 32
PROKOFIEV: Scythian Suite and Lt. Kije, Scherchen & Vienna Sym.
MOZART: Concerti 19, 20, 21, 24, 26, 27
DEBUSSY: La Mer, and Iberia
MOZART: Serenade for 13 Winds. Vienna Sym. Players

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