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September 24, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1954

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Huskles Trounced
In Lone 'M' Clash
Lederman Plots Washington Victory;
Bran off, Baldacci To Lead Gridders
(This is the first in a series of
season long feature stories on Mich- The Huskies were never as poor
igan's various gridiron rivalries.) as that Sept. 27th afternoon, nor
By PHIL DOUGLIS the Wolverines as lucky.
Tony Branoff and Ted 'Kress each
One doesn't have to look long to raced for two touchdowns, while
view the complete Michigan-Wash- Lou Baldacci, Ed Hickey, Dave
ington football rivalry, for it is Hill, and Bob Hurley each dented
only one year old. paydirt once.
The two teams that collide this Michigan, as expected took ar
Saturday in Seattle played for the ;early first quarter lead, wher
first time only last year, and when Branoff swept into the Husky end
the dust had cleared the Wolver- zone at 10:09.
ines were on top by a lopsided 50-0 Huskies tSopped
count. , The fans then settled in their
One of Michigan's smallest open- seats to see if the Huskies would
ing day crowds in history, a mea- open up through the air, and as ex-
ger 51,233 (small for the Michigan pected, they did. Lederman begar
Stadium, that is) was on hand to a barrage, and half way through
watch the execution. the second period, Jim Hustor
The tilt was boomed to be some- snared an apparent touchdowr
thing of a contest . . . with Wash- pass, but it was ruled caught out-
iagton throwing Sandy Lederman's side of the end zone, and Washing-
passing ability and the catching of ton's big chance of the day was
end John Black at the Wolverines .ruined.
But the big duel never came off. From here on it was Michigan's

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TEN YEARS AGO:
Wolverines Copped Big Ten Titles

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-Daily-Dean Morton
THE MICHIGAN GRID SQUAD RELAXES BEFORE TAKEOFF FROM WILLOW RUN AIRPORT
ENROUTE TO SEATTLE. THE TEAM FLEW IN A CHARTERED PLANE FOR THE OPENER
WITH THE HUSKIES.

By DON LINDMAN
From riches to rags in ten years
- that's the story of Michigan's
amm mpionship achievements during1
the past decade.
When the 1954 Wolverine tennis
players hung up their rackets and
it ended the biggest seasons in
Michigan athletic history. Maize-
and-Blue athletes fought for Big
Ten titles in eleven sports, but
failed to gain a single team crown.
Only once before, in 1951, had the
Wolverines failed to gain a con-
ference title since the school re-
entered the Big Ten in 1917.
Tenth Anniversary
Ironically enough, the thwarted
efforts of last season. marked the
tenth anniversary of the greatest
performance by one school in the
history of the Big Ten -- the an-
niversary of Michigan's greatest
The 1943-44 season saw the Wol-
verines, loaded with navy trainees,
capture eight of the nine confer-
ence titles for which they fought.
Sparked by such Wolverine grid
greats as Bob Nussbaumer, Bob
Wiese, Bill Daley, and Elroy
"Crazy-Legs" Hirsch, the football
team romped to an undefeated
son in conference play in addition
to capturing two non-conference
tilts. Sharing the crown with Pur-
due, the Maize-and-Blue gridders
rolled up lop-sided scores in all
Big Ten encounters.
six Big Ten encounters.
Cindermen Blast Illini
With the end of the football sea-
son the Wolverine cindermen went
to work, climaxing a spectacular
season by grabbing the indoor
track title with a record 75%!
points, 35 more than runner-up Il-
linois.Elmer Swanson, now assist-
ant track coach, paced the win
with victories in both the high and
SPORTS
ALAN EISENBERG
Night Editor

low hurdles, besting the great
"Buddy" Young, of Illinois, in the
latter.
In outdoor track the final re-
sults were the same, although the
margin wasn't so great. Once
again the Wolverines finished on
top, scoring 70 points to 58 for
the Illini.
The Wolverine swimmers an-
nexed the conference title with
ease, winning five of the nine
events. But the wrestlers found
the going much harder. After plac-
ing every man in the semi-finals
and recording five falls in the pre-
liminary bouts, the Maize-and-Blue
matmen managed to edge the Pur-
due grapplers, 28-27, to annex the
crown.
After opening with runaway 7-0
and 20-2 wins over Iowa, the Mich-
igan baseball team entered the
final double-header of the season
still needing one victory to clinch
the Big Ten crown. The diamond-
men fought two tight battles with
Purdue, winning the first, 4-2, to

take the title, and capturing the
second game, 3-2.
The' Wolverine golfers routed
conference foes in capturing the
links crown with a 27-stroke mar-
gin over second-place Purdue.
Climaxing the Maize-and-Blue
assault, the tennis squad edged
Ohio State for the net title in an
18-17 thriller. Wolverine hopes
looked dim after the first day of
title competition when the Buck-
eye netters led by two points and
placed five men in the final round
to only three for Michigan. The
Wolverines were equal to the oc-
casion, however, as all three men
conquered OSU opponents to win
titles and give Michigan its eighth
conference title, a record un-
matched in Big Ten history.
MAJOR LEAGUE
Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh 6
completition of suspended
game)
Philadelphia 4, . Pittsburgh 2
(only games scheduled)

(4:: _.

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Welcome, Students
Freshmen, ask the upperclassmen.
Haircuts as you like them.
U. of M. BARBERS
715 North University

Huskies in Final Tuneup;
Pressbox Shut to Scout

SEATTLE (,P)-Michigan's Wol-
verines arrived here Thursday
while their Saturday opponents,
the University of Washington Hus-
kies, ended their last scrimmage
before game time.
Coach John Cherberg worked!
the Huskies squad hard mostly on
their failing ground attack. For
the most part the Huskies have
appeared strongest in the air.
Tickets sales for the game be-
tween the two teams were pick-
ing up as Michigan alumni on the
coast flocked to Seattle.
Washington was having trouble
in the middle of the line, much
like Michigan, and it was a toss-
up which of last week's starters,
Pete Arrivey and Del Jensen,
would be in center's position for
said the crowd may be better than
50,000.

The verbal battle between Bert,
Bell, Commissioner of the National
Football League and various col-
lege athletic officials, among them
Michigan's Fritz Crisler, entered'
its second day, as the commission-
er cited his charges against the
colleges to Nick Kerbawy, gener-
al-manager of the Detroit Lions.
In a long distance phone call to
Kerbawy, the commissioner was?
told by the Detroit Lions' official
of several instances where the col-
leges refused to poocperate with
the pros. One specific charge was
made against Michigan.
One of them was that Bob Nuss-
baumer, who played football for
the Wolverines from 1943-45, and
is now a Lions Scout, was refus-
ed credentials for the Michigan
pressbox.

turn. Scoring twice in the first
period, three times in the second,
twice in the third, and adding a
final marker in the fourth, Michi-
gan was never in trouble.
The Wolverines not only capital-
ized on many Husky miscues, but
also wrecked the westerners in the
statistics column. Piling up 20 first
downs to Washington's 5, and out-
rushing the Huskies 337-72, the
game was "no-contest."
Tomorrow out in Seattle, the
teams meet again. The cast is
much the same. Lederman is back.
So is Branoff, Baldacci, and com-
pany. But the scene is different,'
and with Michigan playing thou-
sands of miles away before a huge
rival crowd under the shadows of
Mount Rainier, anything can hap-
pen, as the Huskies gun for re-
venge.
Regardless of the outcome, one
thing is sure. Another page will
be added to Michigan's fabulous
gridiron recordbook come this Sat-
urday afternoon.
Next Week -- Army
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The Lady is A Tramp
I'll Be Around
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Lazy Bones
Shoo; Fly; Don't Bother Me
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I Love The Way You Say Goodnight
I Went A-Wooin'
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Keepin' Out Of Mischief
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1. Polka
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14. ROYAL PHILHARMONIC
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conducted by Sir Thomas
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Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker Suite; Op. 71a
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3. Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy

I Can't Give You Anything But Love
6. KEN GRIFFIN
Scatter-Brain
Now Is The Hour
7. TONY BENNETT
Close Your Eyes
We Mustn't Say Goodbye
8. HARRY JAMES
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Stompin' At The Savoy (Part 1)
Stompin' At The Savoy (Part 11)
9. DAVE BRUBECK QUARTET
Don't Worry 'Bout Me (Part 1)
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Massenet: The Last Sleep Of The Virgin
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2. Dance Scene (Entrance of the Fairies)
16. ALBERT SCHWEITZER
Bach: Organ Preludes
1. Ein' Feste Burg Ist Unser Gott
2. Gottes Sohn Ist Kommen;
Sei Gegrusset Jesu Gutig
17., ISAAC STERN, violin
A. Zakin, piano

Don't Worry 'Bout Me (Part II)
10. BENNY GOODMAN
and his Orchestra
Wolverine Blues
You're Right-I'm Wrong
11. LES ELGART
and his Orchestra
Josephine
Easy Pickin'
12. DUKE ELLINGTON
and his Orchestra
Primping For The Prom
B Sharp Boston
PERFORMANCES
Moussorgsky: Hopak (Arr. by Rachmaninoff)
Stravinsky: Berceuse from "Firebird Suite"
18. RUDOLF SERKIN, piano
Schubert: Moments Musicaux; Op.94
1. First Movement: Moderato
2. Third Movement: Allegro moderato
Fifth Movement: Allegro vivace
19. ANNA RUSSELL
Chlorophyll Solly
Dripping With Gore
Noisy Neighbors
Miserable
20. ZINO FRANCESCATTI, violin
Artur Balsam, piano
Paganini: Carnival Of Venice (Parts I & 11)

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Wheels who get around

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21. PHI LHAR
OF NEW
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Beethoven: Syr
Second 7Aov
(Beginning)
PHI LHAR
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MONIC ORCHESTRA Second Movement: Andante con moto 24. ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
YORK (Conclusion) Aida: Ritorna Vincitor
nsky, Conductor 22. CELESTINA BONINSEGNA , Pagliacci: Ballatella
mphony No. 5 In C Minor Soprano 25. AL JOLSON, with Guy Lom-
ement: Andante con moto Bellini: Casta Diva from "Norma" bardo and His Royal Canadians
Bellini: Bello A Me Ritorna from "Norma" CLAYTON, JACKSON
MONIC-SYMPHONY 23. MARY GARDEN, Soprano & DURANTE
rRA OF NEW YORK Jongleur de Notre Dame: Liberte Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody
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