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January 08, 1955 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1955-01-08

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«3AIURDAYJANUA Lk 8, 1955

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DESPITE STRUCTURE:
Members Can Make SGC
Effective Student Voice

RETURNING FROM their Christmas vaca-
tinmany students were pleased to hear
that the Regents had approved the proposed
Student Government Council on a two-year
trial basis. After all, the Dec. 18 story on the
Regents' meeting in the Detroit News opened
with something to the effect that the Regents
were bowing to the will of the students as ex-
pressed in a campus referendum.
Other students were not so happy to hear
the news, because they persist in disbelieving
that the Regents bowed to any student wills.
Somewhere in their uncertain minds is a vague
notion that the Regents passed SGC because
they thought it could more easily be controlled
than the Student Legislature. While SL may
not be the most powerful organization on cam-
pus, it did possess certain annoyance capabili-
ties.
INDEED, THE structure of SGC allows more
control possibilities. SL decisions, whatever
else can be said about them, were never sub-
ject to a Review Board. And, although SGC
has in the power of recognizing student organ-
izations something that SL lacked, student gov-
ernment as a whole has not gained in that
respect.
The power of recognizing student organiza-
tion was simply transferred from the Student
Affairs Committee, where there were seven
students out of 15 members, to SGC, where, in
the final analysis, the 7 man Review Board,
with but two student members, is supreme.
Most important of all, SGC's jurisdiction ex-
tends only into areas involving students only.
It does not include matters concerning both
students and the University. In regard to issues
on which the SL has been ineffective, SGC
is equally powerless.
Some think that SGC holds a greater promise
for effectiveness than SL could, because SGC
has been officially recognized by the Univer-
sity's highest governing body, the Board of
Regents. All this means is that SGC is now an

official agent of the Regents, which does not
at all detract from Regental power to reverse
its decisions. The Regents may not even have
to bother if the Review Board is on the ball.
BUT IS IT really as bad as all this? Even if
the Regents did have in mind an organi-
zation more easily controlled by the adminis-
tration, it does not necessarily follow that SGC
will be controlled by the administration. The
real determinant of SGC power will be the
caliber of its personnel, not its structure. The
structure may prevent its becoming much more
powerful than SL, but personnel can prevent
its becoming less powerful than SL.
It is probably true that at least one of the
reasons why the Regents approved SGC was
that they were tempted by the possibility of its
being more controllable. Yet, the really crucial
point is the reason they want a more controll-
able student government.
No doubt, the Regents want a more controll-
able student government because they hesitate
to concede that students, in the rashness of
their youth, know what they are talking about.
It is not really meanness or unscrupulousness,
but a sincere thought that the Regents know
better what's good for the students than the
students themselves.
OUR JOB, then, is to give conclusive evi-
dence that we do know what we are talk-
ing about, that we are responsible persons, and
that we are not unreasonable, or antagonistic
just for the sake of being so.
Therein lies the greatest promise of SGC:
Given its approved structure and top-notch
members, it is in an excellent position to prove
student responsibility to the Regents.
If so, there will be more cooperation between
students and the University, and more things
constructive will be accomplished. SGC would
then have proved itself very much a step i4
the right direction.
-Jim Dygert

"Can You N in Some Seats For Us Tao, Mister?"
5 R5
, 4J
;

DREW PEARSON:
Rayburn
Lets Off

MUSIC REVIEW

TODAY AND TOMORROW:
'Reliabiltiy' of Allies
And Good Diplomacy

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SYMPHONY BAND CONCERT
AS A FEATURE of the 10th Annual Midwestern Music Conference,
the University of Michigan Symphony Band, conducted by Pro-
fessor William D. Revelli, performed in Hill Auditorium last evening.
The program opened with Walton's Orb and Sceptre march and con-
tinued with the Ballet Music from Rossini's William Tell. Raymond
Young, euphomium soloist with the Band, gave a fine performance
of the Rossini' "Largo al Factotum." The first distinguished work of
the evening, Gordon Jacob's Original Suite for Band, featured excel-
lent solo playing by saxophonist Doris Anderson. The Marinuzzi Waltz
was masterfully transcribed by Dr. A. A. Harding, though the work
itself bears little merit. On the other hand, the Bach Toccata and
Fugue which followed exampled a fine musical work inadequately
transcribed. The ensemble sound of the band in the Bach was im-
pressive, though rapid passages were often obscured by inaccurate
playing.
AFTER intermission the second movement of Owen Reed's Sym-
phony "La Fiesta Mexicana" received a fine performance, but
it was regretted that the entire work was not performed in place
of three or four of the insignificant numbers. Robert Dvorak's West
Point Symphony and Glenn Osser's Beguine were of the CinemaScope
moviescore variety, but featured the more colorful sections of the
band. The program concluded with three marches; Jerry Bilik's Block
"M" March overshadowed Goldman's Michigan March in many re-
spect and the program ended loudly with the Stars and Stripes Forever.
--Gordon Mumma
CURRENT MO 0VIES

By WALTER LIPPMANN
ATTHE end of last week when Mr. Mendes-
France had just managed to push the
Paris accords through the Assembly, official
Washington let it be known that they were sick
at heart about the instability of France and
full of doubts about her reliability as an ally.
Now it may be interesting to know how these
officials feel. But it would be even more inter-
esting if they showed that they had given the
problem more serious thought. For the prob-
lem i not new, it is very serious, and it is
highly complicated. To make it known to the
world that you do not trust your ally is a
remarkably poor way of promoting an alliance.
For your ally will repay your distrust with
his distrust.
T HE BEST WAY, it seems to me, to begin
thinking about French instability and re-
liability is to realize that the French, and not
by any means the French only, have been siek
at heart about the instability of the United
States and full of doubts about our relia-
bility as an ally. The decline of American pres-
tige has been very great in the past three years.
The decline is directly related to the in-
stability of the executive in relation to Con-
gress during Truman's last year and Eisen-
howere's first two years. We are shocked, and
rightly so, at the irresponsible destructiveness
of the French Assembly. But we must realize
that our friends throughout the world have
been no less shocked by our own version of
this same kind of irresponsible destructiveness.
Our own instability is not so obvious as the
French because the President does not resign
as does the French Premier. But our own in-
stability, which is having enormous conse-
quences, comes from the same malady. It
comes from the enfeeblement of the execu-
tive power in relation to an aggressive and
aggrandized Assembly. This produces an in-
stability which has caused doubt about the re-
liability of the alliance. The instability in
France has raised the doubt whether the French
would resist a Soviet aggression. The instabil-
ity in Washington has raised the doubt wheth-
er we might let ourselves be unilaterally pushed
or provoked or seduced into taking the steps
that would bring on a world war.
T IS MUCH eveier to cure the instability
under the American than under the French
Constitution. For our Constitution was care-
fully designed by the Founding Fathers to
avoid this aprticular instability. The Constitu-
tion was designed to produce a government in
which the initiative and the leadership are in
the President, in which the Congress advises,
refuses, consents, inquires, but does not itself
govern and administer. The system is weighted
in such a way that normally a President can
take the initiative and hold the leadership,
and in doing so win general national support.
The government works well when it is oper-
ated as a presidential government. It works
very badly when the President is weak, and
when he appeases a Congress which is in a
mood to usurp the executive power. The gov-

country cannot be made stable and be governed
well by personal feats. It is hard for the ob-
server to see how France can achieve stability
without a reform of the Constitution.
AS FOR THE reliability of alliances, the best
insurance is not to forget that no alliance
is ever absolute, that all alliances are rela-
tive to historic circumstances and subject to
the vital interests of the country. There is no
such thing as an alliance which will work au-
tomatically at all times under all conditions.
When we think about the "reliability" of an
alliance, we are really asking ourselves how
far and under what circumstances it would
work automatically. The answer to that ques-
tion is of the greatest consequence in military
planning, and we can be quite sure that it is
a question that the Russians never forget to
think about. We can be sure too that if they
are planning a' military aggression, they will
plan it in such a way as to prevent the NATO
alliance from working automatically. They will
produce a confused situation which divides the
allies, not a simple and obvious situation-such
as a march towards Paris-which unites them
automatically.
THINKING ABOUT the reliability of our al-
lies we shall, therefore, do well to shun
moral judgments and to translate our doubts
into a cool appraisal of how far, in which of
the possible situations, the alliance will work
automatically. For when an alliance is not
automatic, which is almost all the time, good
diplomacy consists in taking nothing for grant-
ed, in taking no one, no matter how fashion.
able and popular he may be at the moment,
as definitely lined up, and in recognizing that
an alliance is a tie that has to be renewed
continually.
Copyright, 1955, New York Herald Tribune, Inc.
Sixty-Fifth Year
Edited and managed by students of the University of
Michigan under the authority of the Board in Control
of Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig.......................Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers............................City Editor
Jon Sobeloff.......... ..,....~.Editorial Director
Pat Hoelofs. .............Associate City Editor
Becky Conrad. ..**. . ..Associate Editor
N"n Swinehart.......................Associate Editor
Dave ivingston,.......................Sports Editor
Hlanley Gurwin ....... .....Associate Sports Editor
Warren Wertheimer............Associate Sports Editor
Roz Shllmovitz .. .... . Women's Editor
Joy Squires....... ..........Associate Women's Editor
Janet Smith..............*..Associate Women's Editor
Dean Morton.....................Chief Photographer
Business Staf f
Lois Po-ak. ------- Business Manager
Phil Brunskill...,...Associate Business Manager
Bill Wise ..... .s..Advertising Manager
Mary Jean Monkoski................ Finance Manager

1 Steam
WASHINGTON-When veteran
Congressman Clarence Brown
of Ohio opened the secret Repub-
lican caucus this week, he said
with a chuckle: "I do not have
a schedule of procedure. However,
when the Democrats completed
their caucus in this chamber a
few hours ago, they perhaps in-
advertently left a copy of their
agenda behind them. Maybe we
should adopt it here as a gesture
of good will. We have to get along
with these feliowv for the next two
years."
Brown would hardly have sug-
gested following the Democrats
had he known what transpired at
the opposition caucus. There "Mr.
Sam" Rayburn of Texas-the "Mr.
Big" of the House of Represen-
tatives - unloosed some pent-up
steam which had been bothering
him, as well as many other Demo-
crats, for some time.
"The country must come first,"
the new Speaker proclaimed. "On
issues affecting the national se-
curity the President can expect
and will get our support.
"However;" continued Rayburn,
"We Democrats cannot forget
some of the tactics employed by
the President's own party in the
last campaign, the reckless smear-
ing of Democrats as alleged trai-
tors, with which the President saw
fit to identify himself."
Rayburn specifically singled out
Vice-President Nixon as the bell-
wether of these attacks. But he
also pinned responsibility on Eis-
enhower. The President, he said,
had first contended he hadn't read
Nixon's statement in the news-
papers. Later he praised Nixon for
doing a "great job" in the last
campaign.
"Ip my estimation, that makes
Eisenhower a party to these un-
warranted attacks on our patri-
otism," Rayburn told the secret
caucus. "I'm of a forgiving na-
ture,( but I cannot forgive or for-
get the nasty aspersions that were
hurled on my party by some peo-
ple high in the councils of the
Republican Party.
"Attacks on our loyalty, as Am-
ericans, are far beyond the nor-
mally accepted tactics in a poli-
tical campaign," said the man who
has served longer consecutively in
Congress than anyone else. "The
last campaign marked an all-time
low for gutter politics and political
muckracking."
No More Pearl Harbors
RAYBURN further told the clos-
ed-door session that with the
world "sitting on the edge of a
precipice," Democrats in Congress
would give no support to GOP ef-
forts to balance the Federal bud-
get "at the sacrifice of an ade-
quate national defense."
"I hate to pay taxes the same
as everyone else, including the
New York bankers who are preach-
ing about a balanced budget at a
time when our democratic econo-
my is threatened by the deadliest
foreign enemy we have ever fac-
ed," said Mr. Sam.
Franklin D. Roosevelt, he re-
called, pleaded in vain for suffi-
cient defense funds prior to World
War II.
"That war eventually cost us
about $400,000,000,000," Rayburn
continued, "whereas the expendi-
ture of a few more billions earlier
might have prevented the Jap at-
tack on Pearl Harbor.
"The same is true today," con-
cluded the Speaker. "Even though
it throws the budget out of bal-
ance, we must spare no defense
spending to make our nation so
strong that no predatory dictator
or international pirate will dare

attack us."
Spotless Governor
UNLIKE SOME Washington bu-
reaucrats, the Governor of
Puerto Rico is not opposed to tak-
ing a suggestion from the press,.
Last month this column report-
ed:
"Mystery surrounds the reason
why General Motors continues to
be the highest bidder and get con-
tracts despite that. Recently, Pu-
erto Rico asked bids on 50 buses.
Lowest bid was made by Mack
Trucks. Highest bid was by Gen-
eral Motors--$900 per bus higher
than Mack. General Motors got
the contract. Total extra cost to
Puerto Ricans: $45,000.,"
Gov. Munoz Marin, who has a
spotless record for honesty in gpv-
ernment, read the column in the
San Juan El Imparcial, immedi-
ately jumped into action. He can-
celed the contract for school buses,
ordered his transportation author-
ity to ask for new bids. He went
even further. His office took the
trouble to write a letter to this
column expressing appreciation
for calling the matter to his at-

MONDAY
TUFgDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12,
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
2
3

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACkHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE ,AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 17 to January 27, 1955
' For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time of
class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

Wednesday, January 19
Saturday, January 22
Tuesday, January 25
Monday, January 17
Tuesday, January 18
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Monday, January 24
Wednesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Monday, January 17

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

4j

SPECIAL PERIODS

Literature,
English 1, 2
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Russian 1
Political Science 1
Sociology 1, 54, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23
Psychology 31

Science and the Arts
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 26

.2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

f

rI

4 tj

S.

I

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

English 11
Drawing 3
M.I.E. 136
C.E. 23, 151
Drawing 1
M.I.E. 135
C.M. 107
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
Drawing 2
E.E. 5
P.E. 31, 32
E.M. 1, 2 -
C.M. 113, 115
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23

Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

At the Orpheum . ...
ROB ROY by Walt Disney
and Friends.
HERE ARE two Disney features
on display at the Orpheum this
time; first, Pecos Bill, which com-
bines animation and real people;
next Rob Roy, which is with live
people only,
Pecos Bill is indeed droll ex-
cept for a few unnecessary epi-
sodes showing Roy Rogers and his
cowboy chums sitting around the
campfire, telling tales of Pecos Bill
to a couple of little urchins. How-
ever, this lapse into realism is
quickly corrected, and we are once
more amidst creatures of fantasy
and imagination. Somehow, this
blend of reality and unreality is
unsettling. The live scenes seem
contrived, and generally uncon-
vincing; an intrusion into the
more appealing Disney World. For
all these minor unsatisfying bits,
this short is most adequate.
Before turning to the main
work of the evening, something
must be said concerning a singu-
larly sickening bit of high-pres-
sure pandering. For all the wor-
thy work done by the March of
Dimes, it seems hardly necessary
to wrench money from the pub-
lic by showing a girl gasping a

few words to her mother from
an iron lung.
And now for Rob Roy. He is a
Scotsman of some sort who leaps
over hill and moor, unhampered
by trousers, and generally makes
life miserable for the King's men;
picking squabbles wvith everyone.
The Scotch are revolting against
a German King, and a sneering
fellow who claims to be a villain
(but we know better, Walt) and
collects taxes.
The photography is excellent,
the costumes authentic, except for
a few bare-bosom creations, and
the dialog dreadful. But then, who
listens?
Still, the sight of Rob Roy
swinging through the trees, the
British on his tail, he shouting:
"Hoot Mon! Me 'arzan, You
Bridget!"-is more than enough
to erase the memory of buxom
Glynnis Johns, who plays his
wift, and struggles with the of-
ten disappointing lines she has
been given. But then, perhaps
this is in keeping with the "bold
men, quiet women" theme of the
Adventure Story.
King George is well played, as
are most of the other characters,
and aside from the above men-
tioned weaknesses, this film should
hold the attention of all but the
hardened esthete.
--David Kessel &
Dori Appel

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Literature, Science and the Arts
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building before January 7 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

A

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

it

No Panacea . .
To the Editor:
IT HAS OFTEN come to our at-
tention when reading The Dai-
ly, articles praising the virtues of
SGC . . . SGC they say, is all
powerful, it can accomplish any-
thing, it is the answer to the stu-
dent's prayer. Then perhaps you
can answer a question regarding
it that has been bothering us of-
ten of late. We don't like the Ann
Arbor weather-do you suppose
that SGC can vote it out?

to bring about lasting peace in the
world-such as Ladejinsky's land
reform programs-or whether our
Federal Government is primarily
concerned with the negative no-
tion of 'Yet's be"absolutely sure of
maximum personnel security all
along the line.' This latter policy
can only be carried out by firing
or shooting everyone! The won-
derful thing about people is, that
while all of them are fallable and
even likely to err, there are crea-
tive possibilities within them,
which, if encouraged, can result in

(Continued from Page 2)
cluding Sat. and Sun., extra showing
wed. at 12:30.
Coming Events
Hillel Chorus Rehearsal. Sun., 4:30
p.m. in main chapel.
Hillel: Sun. Supper Club 6:00 p.m.
followed by record dance.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Can-
terbury House breakfasts following both
the 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. services Sun.,
Jan. 9. "Faith of the Church" lecture
series, 4:30 p.m., Sun., Jan. 9, at Can-
terbury House. Epiphany Festival of

Art in Rome. Slides of travel and ar-
chitecture. Center, corner o Hill St.
and Forest Ave.
Women's Research Club will meet
Mon., Jan. 10 in the East Lecture Ioom
of the Rackh;m Building at 8:00 p.m.
Miss Winifred Moore will speak on
"Preview of Operation Cactus."
Democratic Party Day, sponsored by
the Michigan Citizenship Clearing
House, the Poli. Sci. Dept., and the
YD's. Rackham Aud. Mon., Jan. 10.
Professors gsand students from' various
Michigan colleges, and State Party offi-
cials will take part in a morning panel
discussion, afternoon group discussions,
and a luncheon in the Union Ballroom
at 12:15 p.m. Featured speaker will be

1

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