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January 05, 1955 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y 5, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGXII

Y 5 195 HE ICHGA DA'V As

End-of-Term Events
Planned at Lane Hall

Lane Hall, the campus religious
center, has several events planned
before the close of the semester,
including coffee hours, open hous-.
es and a weekend excursion.
Coffee will be served each day
during the exam period, beginning
January 17 a n d continuing
through the 27th. Students will be
welcome at the center on South
State St. any time after 4 p.m.
on days that examinations are
scheduled. There will be no charge
for the coffee.
A big event for Lane Hall will
be the first annual Winter Ren-
dezvous, planned for Jan. 25
through Jan. 28. Twenty men and
20 coeds will leave the University
campus by car at 3 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 25, to spend several days at
Lake Huron Methodist Camp.
Titled "Resources for Richer
Livg," the Rendezvous will of-
fer devotional reading, medita-
tion, prayer, hobbies, recreation
and community activity to those
participating. Leading the group
will be William J. McKeefery,
Ph.D., Dean of Alma College.
Opportunities Offered
Other opportunities for those
attending will be special leader-
ship in arts and crafts, folk sing-
J-Hop Tickets
Tickets for the 1955 J-Hop,
to be held Friday, Feb. 4, will
go on sale to reservation hold-
ers from 1 to 5 p.m. tomorrow
and Friday in the Administra-
tion Building. Students with-
out reservations may obtain the
tickets next week.

.
ing and folk and square dancing.
The main lodge of the camp has
a library, materials and tools for
hobby work, fireplaces and a beau-
tiful natural setting.
The students will be housed in
heated cabins on the camp prop-
erty. Necessary articles for camp-
ers are sleeping bags or blankets,
warm clothing, towels and per-
sonal articles, flashlights, ice
skates, musical instruments, hob-
by materials and books pertaining
to richer living.
The cost of the excursion is
$8.75. Selection of the 40 students
will be based solely upon prompt-
ness in returning the registration
blank, which may be obtained at
Lane Hall.
Doris Harpole, program assist-
ant at the religious center, sug-
gests that interested men and
women pick up their applications
as soon as possible. "It will be a
matter of first come, first
serve,' " she stated. "Members of
any race, religion or belief are
welcome."
J-Hop Open House
The final activity of the pres-
ent semester will be the J-Hop
weekend open houses, to be held'
from 9 p.m. to 4 a.m. on Friday,
Feb. 4 and 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. the'
following evening.
Highlighting the affairs will be
square and social dancing, table
games, musical entertainment,
soft drinks, cookies and candy. A
movie is tentatively scheduled.
There will be no charge for ad-
mission, refreshments or enter-
tainment. Every student is cor-
dially invited to attend

Story Contest
Offers Coeds
Cash Awards
'Mademoiselle' Holds
Annual Competitions
For Talented Writers
Awards totaling $1,000 are be-.
ing offered by Mademoiselle mag-
azine as it again conducts its an-
nual College Fiction Contest.
Any woman undergraduate un-
der 26-years-old who is regularly
enrolled in a degree-granting col-
lege is eligible to receive one of
two $500 awards for serial rights
to her story and publication in
Mademoiselle.
Contestants may enter more
than one story. Compositions
should run from 2,500 to 5,000
words. Work that has been pub-
lished in undergraduate publica-
tions will be accepted if it has
not appeared elsewhere.
Entries should be typewritten,
double-spaced on one side only of
regulation-size paper. The contes-
tant's name, age, home address,
school address and school year
should be marked on the work.
The magazine asks that a self -ad-
dressed and stamped 81/2 by 11
inch manila envelope be enclosed.
Deadline for the contest has
been set for April 15. Compositions
should be sent to : College Fiction
Contest, Mademoiselle, 575 Mad-
ison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y.
Judging will be by Mademoiselle
editors. Winners will be announc-
ed in the August issue.
Among the young American
writers who have gotten their lit-
erary start through the contest
are finalists in 1950, J. Carol
Goodman and Ilona Karmal, who
had their stories reprinted in Thf
Best American Short Stories of
until 3

'INTERNATIONAL TERRITORY:'

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
SILVER BLADES-These coeds are among the many women
students taking advantage of the skating lessons conducted by
the Women's Physical Education Department and the open
skating periods held at the Coliseum. Classes are conducted
every afternoon, with the rink open to anyone every evening and
Sunday afternoon.

By ROSE PERLBERG
"Your host for this tour is the
American Association for the
United Nations (AAUN), a non-
profit educational organization in-
terested in helping more people
learn about the purposes and work
of the United Nations."
More than 1,500,000 people have
heard this or a similar introduc-
tion, as they began a one hour
jaunt through "international ter-
ritory," the new UN headquarters
located between 42nd and 47th
streets in New York City.
When the buildings were com-
pleted two years ago, the AAUN
was given a contract to operate a
guided tour. According to Andro-
mache Geanacopoulos, supervisor
of operations, the tour has been a
"roaring success." "We started out
with 10 guides in October, 1952.
Today their number has increased
to 75," she said. .
Women Guides
The guides are all women. The
only men concerned with the
tours are the director and his as-
assistant.
Miss Geanacopoulos explained
that the staff is international.
"Guides come from 30 different
countries. Each speaks several
languages. More than 30 different
tongues are spoken," she said. Al-
though college graduates are pre-
ferred, some high school gradu-
ates also qualify.
Guides do not memorize their
stories. They are subject to a two
to three week orientation pro-
gram. Attending daily classes,
they see films and do consider-
able reading.
Applicants conduct tours under
observation for a month before be-
coming permanent guides. From

UN Offers Daily Educational Tours

time to time members of UN spe-
cialized agencies hold refresherj
seminars.
To help guides cope with visi-
tors' questions, the preceeding
day's events as well as the agenda
for that day are discussde daily.
In addition, guides are expected to
read The New York Times or The
Herald Tribune to keep posted on
current UN events.
The tour starts with an archi-
Union Little Club
To Reopen Doors'
For Final Dance
Students will have their last
opportunity this semester to go
"nightclubbing" at the Union
Little Club from 9 p.m. to mid-
night Friday in the North Lounge
of the Union.
The Union had originally
planned not to open the Club
again this semester, but Harvey
Rutstein, dance chairman, re-
ports that the demand has been
so great that dancing andbre-
freshments will be offered one
more time.
Open for the first time since
the beginning of December, the
Club's bandstand will feature
Paul Brodie and his Stardusters.
In the usual cabaret setting,'
featuring red checked table-
cloths and candlelight, couples
may gather for the evening for
$1. Those dropping in after 10:30
p.m., following a movie or the
hockey game, will be admitted for
75 cents.

tect's model of the UN. Then con-
ference sections of the Trustee-
ship, Security, Economic and So-
cial Councils are seen.
The climax of the tour is a vis-
it to the General Assembly Hall
where all 60 delegates convene. A
walk through the lobby of the
Secretariat building affords a
view of the unique architecture.
Guides' Duties
"The job of the guide is not to
editorialize but to describe the
purpose and function of the UN
and it specializ. 1 agencies," Miss
Geanacopoulos declared. "Each
guid eabsorbs the information and
presents it in her own way. The re-
sult is that no two tours are alike,
each being a reflection of the
guides own personality."
In the course of their work,
guides are exposed to unexpected
and humorous situations. One
guide overheard two visitors dis-
cussing a tour she had just con-
ducted. "You know," tlhe first re-
marked, "the guide said those
sticks we saw in the last confer-
ence room were accoustics, but I
know they were really bamboo
poles.''
Another guide recans an elderly
gentleman who clamped the ear-
phones, that gave translations of
the discussion in different lan-
guages, tightly on his head an*lis--
tened attentively to the guide. At
the end of the tour he said "That
was a very interesting tour, Miss,
but there's something wrong with
those hearing aids!"
A special desk where visitors
can direct any questions concern-
ing UN work and functions is
visited at the end of each tour.
ra mrrrrr."x"}":i; m :i.Yr, [ eErmr{rr

Coeds

Learn Fancy Steps

I

n Figure Skating

Classes

"Performing steps like the 'bun-
ny hop,' 'spiral turn,' 'waltz jump'
and 'mohawk' can be pretty ex-
citing, especially when perform-
ing on such an 'unstable' sub-
stance as ice," remarked Helen M.
Stewart, instructor in the Depart-
ment of Women's Physical Educa-
tion.
Miss Stewart said that the Uni-

versity has sponsored coed figure
skating for several years under the
direction of Mary Francis Gres-
chke. Over 100 coeds are enrolled
in the beginning classes which
start off with the teaching of fig-
ure skating fundamentals, Miss
Stewart related.
"These include learning to use
'edges' and to perform basic steps.
Later in the course several dance
steps are taught. Free skating
movements are also -pfacticed."
Miss Stewart went on to say
that before a class is completed,
each student must demonstrate
the "edges," both inside and out,
forward and backward. She must
also perform a free skating move-
ment and sometimes is asked to
demonstrate one of the dance
steps for the class.

9%

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Contribute to

"Stephania,"
first novel was
Literary Guild

Miss Karmal's
also selected as a
book.

GENERATION
Magazine
Deadline for Feb. 16 issue: TODAY
FICTION - ESSAY - POETRY - MUSIC - ART

I

,4cro'44 Coa~n2

I

"Coeds seem to enjoy the class
very much," Miss Stewart com-
mented. "Ice skating is a sport
women can enjoy after leaving
school and can teach to their
children."

11

Classes are held at the Coliseum
from 1 to 3 p.m. every weekday
but Friday. Free skating is offer-
ed in the evenings and Sunday af-
ternoon.

Miss Stewart also mentioned
that an intermediate course in
figure skating will be offered next
semester for coeds who have taken
I beginning ice skating or who have
= had previous experience.

RI'

"s

11

1I

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on

the

BalL
it-

JUNIOR PANHEL-There will
be an important meeting of the
Junior Panhellenic Association at
4:30 p.m. today in the League. An
evaluation of pledging will be the
chief topic of discussion.
* * *
JGP COMMITTEE-Members of
the JGP central committee will]
meet at 8 p.m. today in the Lea-
gue. The room number will be
posted.
GULANTICS TRYOUTS-Final
tryouts for Gulantics, annual all-
campus talent show, will be con-
ducted from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday
in Rm. 3-G of the Union. Stu-
dents interested in trying out may
contact Debbie Shavelson, League
representative in charge of audi-
tioning, to receive further infor-
mation or to make a tryout ap-
pointment.
RIDING CLUB - The Riding
Club will not meet again this se-
mester. Meetings will be resumed
the first week of next semester.
CANTERBURY CLUB -- The
members of Canterbury Club, the
Episcopal student foundation, will
sponsor a student-faculty tea
from 4 to 6 p.m. today at the
Canterbury House, located at 218
N. Division St.
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