100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 04, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


roUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. TANITARV A_ 7'9_K!C

FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY TI1I~flAV ZA7~'!tTA1~T A 1O~E

-v~unE . n~u ..' 5AlL ', £.7~F

k

DIPLOMACY?:
French Assembly Vote
On German Rearmament

"Yaaaa -

We've Got More Security Than
You Have"

THE WEST last week succeeded in clearing
a major barrier to rearming West Ger-
many-France's reluctance to allow her three-
time foe to join the Western European Union
and NATO. By a very narrow margin, follow-
ing a first vote against German rearmament,
the French Assembly approved a treaty allow-
ing for the rearmament of West Germany.
Americahs welcomed the French vote, even
though it showed France has reservations
about rearmament. The American attitude and
the French attitude need examination. When
the French narrowly defeated the move to
rearm West Germany, United States diplo-
mats made known to the world that "it would
be difficult" to continue giving aid to the "un-
willing" French. This ultimatum put econom-
ically weak France on the spot. Threatened
with reduced aid from her richest ally, France
had a choice of losing completely her position
as a world power, or of favoring aiding the re-
armament of her often threatening neighbor.
THE UNITED STATES' message to Paris
following the first negative vote on the is-
sue clearly indicated that France's choice was
less than that: for she was reminded that only
the method of rearmament was at stake; ei-
ther the French participated in giving arms to
Germany, or they didn't. The United States
and Britain would arm West Germany any-
way.
France's position wasn't considered fairly it
seems. She has reason for refusing to act as
an American puppet in defense against Russia

in the armament war. Her people are wary of
building up a 500,000 German force-which
happens to be the largest national force in
Western Europe-in a country that has caused
her downfall so often. The French feel West-
ern rearmament has proceeded far enough.
They reasonably ask for negotiations with the
Russians, rather than . continued hysterical
arms building, army training. According to
these deputies' reports, a general European
settlement with Moscow that would make re-
armament of West Germany unnecessary is
still sought. In an age of untrusting nations,
this certainly seems to be the most sane ap-
proach.
BUT NOT ONLY the French were hesitant
about approving rearmament of Germany.
The Germans themselves do not completely
favor building up their army because they feel
certain Nazi leaders who were powerful ene-
mies of the French as well as the will of the
German people are again in strong positions
that could become dangerously aggressive to
all of free Europe. Other Germans oppose the
move because they desire a united Germany
unarmed, rather than a divided Germany with
the now western supported half.
There is strong opposition to rearming the
western half of Germany, by the people most
closely involved. Yet the United States took a
stand that forced France into her now precar-
ious position-this is modern diplomacy at its
worst.
--Pat Roelofs

$TArED. AtM
TOD Y AND TOMORRO
Years Ed hos e
Problems for West

SGC Action Shows Regents.
Consider Student Views

THE REGENTS took notice of heavy student
support for the Student Government Coun-
cil Plan and passed SGC at their monthly meet-
ing, Dec. 17. The action, giving University
students their first Regent-recognized stu-
dent government, climaxing almost one year's
effort toward creating a satisfactory replace-
ment for the almost powerless Student Legis-
lature. Although some impatient student lead-
ers constantly doubted the Regents' sincerity in
ever passing SGC the Board moved steadily if
somewht slowly toward sanction of the new
government. The Dec. 17 decision quieted opin-
ion on issues and student confidence in the
Regental body was unquestionably increased
by SGC's passage.
Both in September when the original SGC
plan was referred to a special study commit-
tee for further observation and in November
when the Regents referred the plan to an all-
campus poll the Board was criticized for inac-
tion. Both times cries were heard that the Re-
gents were deliberately delaying a decision.
However in both cases the delay was justified
and when some financial problems concern-
ing the plan had been solved and after stu-
dents definitely had indicated support for SGC
the Regents quickly gave official sanction to
the plan.

SGC IN NO SENSE of the word is perfection
in student government. But as Kenneth L.
Jones of the botany department, a member of
the SGC study committee said a short time
ago, SGC is a start in the right direction. Ac-
tivity in the next few months will determine
whether its obvious pitfalls will result in a
strong, responsible, representative student gov-
ernment or a weak administration-controlled
organization.
Students by an overwhelming margin dem-
onstrated their confidence the former would
evolve. They showed they do not think the Re-
view Board, devised to review certain jurisdic-
tional action by SGC, will turn SGC into a
'puppet' by reviewing all 'controversial' deci-
sions.
SOON students must elect 11 responsible stu-
dent leaders to the elective SGC posts. Noth.
ing will give the Review Board and the cam-
pus at large confidence in SGC quicker than
an outstanding student governing body void
of members elected pursely on a popularity
basis. Both students and administration have
the responsibility of making the plan adopted
by the Board of Regents Dec. 17 more than
just a start' toward student government.
--Dave Baad

CURRENT MOVIES

At the State...
THE VIOLENT MEN with Gleni, Ford and
Barbara Stanwyck.
ENJOYED this movie immensely. Everyone
in it seemed to also.
The "violent men" who I took to be the
bad guys, were credibly mean and scurvy and
went about their business of beating, shooting,
setting fire to, and sassing, everyone in sight,
with unparalleled relish. Glenn Ford as the
Shane-esque hero also seemed satisfied with
his less strenuous part.
THE SITUATION is so stock as to be witty
and idiotic. The only switch is that the
little Mexican girl does not get killed, as is
her usual wont, in the end but-it would be
unfair to tell any more of the surprise in
store.
Glenn Ford who we learn has for several
years been nursing his Civil War wounds in
this wide-screen valley is suddenly besieged on
all sides by all manner of people who can
roughly be divided into (1) good small ranch-
ers who want him to pitch in and fight
against Edward G. Robinson who is trying to.
squeeze everybody out of the valley and (2)
Robinson's hired killers who want to make sure
he sells his ranch.
Ford, whose only interest is to sell the ranch
and marry his girl and go "out East," remains
impassive until the killers cruelly knock off
one of his hired help. Then he becomes impas-
sioned: he kills the most nasty of the killers
in a dandy bar scene, organizes an ambush,
and sets fire to Robinson's ranch. In the end
peace is restored and he maTries the girl.
NOT HOWEVER the girl he was engaged to,
nor the little Mexican girl. He marries Ed-
ward G. Robinson's daughter, an exceedingly
unsympathetic trull who is either sniveling at
her mother (Miss Stanwyck) or reciting mem-
orized speeches going something like, "Don't
fight boys. It's 'not nice. Gee I'm pretty."
Barbara. Stanwyck, to round out the female
trio, acts enthusiastically and as .well as she

At the Michigan...
THREE RING CIRCUS with Martin and
Lewis.
ACCORDING TO numerous "10-most" popu-
larity lists making their annual appear-
ances, the comedy team of Dean Martin and
Jerry Lewis seems to have endeared them-
selves to the American public. Just why is
difficult to say. The only apparent explana-
tions are that Americans have not yet out-
grown the "pie-in-the-face" comedy school, or
perhaps that slapstick holds something which
is innately laugh-provoking to mankind. In
any event, Lewis has received fame through no
small degree of effort. His is a comedy tech-
nique that is more frenzied -- he screams,'
jumps, pouts, shrieks, yells, growls-thanany
offered by the many "animal" friends who
occupy the screen with him in Three Ring Cir-
cus.
FOLLOWING the same basic comedy situa-
tions employed in their previous screen ef-
forts, the boys, upon leaving the army, join a
circus run by a woman owner (JoAnne Dru),
whom Martin calls "Boss Lady." They fight
but they are really in love. Their main point of
contention is Zsa Zsa Gabor, a trapeze artist,
who takes Martin into her arms and whispers,
"Peeeter, in my coundry dere are no barriers.
Ven a voman vants someting she takes eet."
Throughout all of these romantic complica-
tions Martin looks like he is always going to
break into a song (he does solo "It's a Big,
Wide, Wonderful World" and duets with Lewis
on "Hey, Punchinello").
Lewis keeps repeating, "You know how badly
I want to be a clown." He tries very hard:
Lewis shot from a cannon, Lewis trying to
shave the bearded lady, Lewis getting emersed
in cream custard, Lewis washing the elephants,
Lewis jumping into a net. During the last fif-
teen minutes Lewis takes a try at a big sob-
scene with a paralytic child-the sort that
Charlie Chaplin used to thrill grandma with-
it's not very exciting, but it is a change.
In accordance with the newly instituted Hol-
lywood custom of making movies "bigger and

LIPPMANN- CRYSTAL BOWL--
AS THE OLD YEAR was coming
to an end, there became visible
something of the shape of things
to come. I know that in a venture
of this sort we are all of us like
the blind men in the fable who
were trying to describe the shape
of the elephant from what they
could learn by touching it. But
there have been three stories in
the past three weeks which, put
together, foretell something big
and important that we shall be
running into,
ONE IS THE CRISIS of indeci-
sion in the French Parliament
on the role of France in Europe
and in the world. The heart of
this crisis has been that the demo-
cratic Assembly is so divided in its
aims and so contradictory in its
views that it cannot render a firm
judgment about the vital interests
of France. This malady of the
French democracy is not confined
to France. Our own Congress, for
example, is in a similar state of
deadlock and confusion over our
policy in the Far East. The mem-
bers of Congress are so divided
within their own minds, they are
so committed by the many state-
ments and speeches they have
made, that they cannot go beyond
saying no to those who want to
make war and no to those who
do not.
The second story is that Moscow
and Peking have for the time be-
ing returned to the tactic of in-
creasing rather than of relaxing
the tension. This is understandable
enough in regard to Europe in the
face of the Western push to rearm
Germany. But the German prob-
lem is not a sufficient explanation
of why Peking has also chosen this
time to increase the tension by
such acts as the conviction of the
American airmen. For when Pe-
king made this decision the Amer-
ican policy in the Far East was
undergoing the important modifi-
cation of limiting the Nationalist's
practical aims of the defense of
Formosa and the Pescadores. This
was a decisive step in withdrawing
American support from counter-
revolution in China. Yet Peking
chose that moment to exacerbate
the relations not only with the
United States but with the Euro-
pean nations who fought with the
United States in Korea.
The third big story at the year's
end is probably the biggest of all.
It is the decision at Jakarta by the
Prime Ministers of the Colombo
Powers, that is to say of Pakistan,
India, Burma, Ceylon and Indo-
nesia, to call a conference in April
ofthe thirty "independent govern-
ments" of Asia and Africa. The
more closely one reads the text of
this historic communique, the
plainer it is that we and our lead-
ing European allies are not going
to be able to afford the luxury of
parliamentary confusion and delay
which prevents our governments
from making clear and firm de-
cisions in Asia and in Africa. The
fixing of April as a date for the
meeting of the Asian-African con-
ference is in effect the setting of a
kind of deadline for a great many
issues, such as Formosa, and per-
haps North Africa as well-which
will have to be much more clearly
dealt with than they are now.
LET US HAVE no illusions about
the fact that the United States
and its leading allies in Western
Europe are going to be the judged
and not the judges at this April
conference. The official communi-
tim' all hut savs in so manv Twords

and Israel, There appear to have
been two main criteria of non-
admission. One is to be now a
satellite or colony of the West.
Formosa and Korea are not treat-
ed as "independent governments."
The second criterion is not to be
of Asian stock, as the Soviet Union,
Australia and New Zealand are
not.
* * *
THE LIST of the states they did
invite makes it very evident
that this is no mere attempt to
make a neutral bloc or a third
force in between the giant military
powers. Red China is no neutral
and no third force. What this is,
to put it plainly, is the most for-
midable and ambitious move yet
made in this generation to apply
the principle of Asia for the
Asians.
The members of the conference
are to include all the great Asian
powers - foremost among them
India, Pakistan, Japan and China.
The conference intends to promote
economic, social and cultural co-
operation. But the least common
denominator among the members,
the sentiment which unites them
most easily, is their alignment on
what the communique describes
as "problems affecting national
sovereignty and of racialism and
of colonialism." The United States
and its allies are going to be put
on t he defensive, and they had
better not lose much time seeing
to it that the positions they are
going to defend are in fact de-
fensible.
* * *,
SO FAR AS we are concerned,
Formosa is the place of greatest
vulnerability. It is vulnerable not
perhaps because there is danger
of war but because of the danger
of our finding ourselves isolated
from and at odds with the niassive
sentiment of all of Asia. In point
of fact the American position in
Formosa is by way of becoming
more rational and, therefore, more
intelligible and defensible.
In Washington, in Paris, and in
some degree in all the democratic
capitals, the question is whether
the elected assemblies will support
those revisiols of judgment and
those decisions of policy which
are called for by the swift march
of world events.
(Copyright, 1955, NY. Her. Trib., Inc.)
Sixty-Fifth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig,.....Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers.............City Editor
Jon Sobeloff.... ...Editorial Director
Pat Roelofs ......Associate City Editor
Becky Conrad .........Associate Editor
Nan Swinehart .......Associate Editor
Dave Livingston.........Sports Editor
Hanley Gurwin ... Assoc. Sports Editor
Warren Wertheimer
..........Associate Sports Editor
Roz Shlimovitz........Women's Editor
Joy Squires ..Associate' Women's Editor
Janet Smith Associate Women's Editor
Dean Morton. .s..Chief Photographer
Business Staff
Lois Pollak .........Business Manager
Phil Brunskill, Assoc. Business Manager
Bill Wise ..,......Advetising Manager
Mary Jean Monkoski .Finance Manager
Telephone NO 23-24-1

DREW PEARSON:
Ike Urged
To Run
.again
WASHINGTON-Two series of
backstage conferences have
been taking place in Washington
which may spell out whether the
President runs-and is elected-
for a second term.
The- most important conference
was held in the White House with
Ike's closest friendscand advisers.
The other conferences have been
held by the Democrats over the
question of whether they should
make the President himself their
main target for attack.
Various reports have come out
of the White House regarding the
recent stag dinner which pu the
heat on Ike to run again. One re-
port emanating from the office of
Vice-President Nixcn stated that
Eisenhower had agreed to run and
that Nixon had been picked to ra.
with him.
This was wrong on both counts.
First, Fisenhower did not agree
to run; second, )ot a word was
mentioned about Nixon being his
running mate, In fact, Nixon sat
on the sidelines during the din-
ner discussion and hardly opened
his mouth. The story which his of-
fice later fed to the United Press
was a carefully laid plan.
What actually happened, as
pieced together from various re-
liable sources, was that Ike's
friends did lay down a terrific
barrage of persuasion that he run
again. He listened, seemed im-
pressed, made no promises. At
one point, he remarked:
"You're making it awfully tough
on me."
But that was as far as he went.
IKE'S HEALTH
rTHOSE AT the dinner included
GOP Chairman Len Hall, At-
torney General Brownell, UN Dele-
gate Cabot Lodge, William E. Rob-
inson of the Robinson-Hannagan
public relations firm; Tracy Voor-
hees, Assistant Secretary of War
under Truman. now a vigorous Ike
rooter; and many of the original
pre-Chicago "I Like Ike" boosters.
Each one took his turn urging
the President to run, telling him
no one else could win, appealing
to his sense of duty. One remark-
ed: "We can see that you're in
magnificient health." Another re-
marked: "Your popularity is as
high as ever."
Attorney General Brownell fi-
nally produced a clipping quoting
Adlai Stevenson to the effect that
he couldn't beat Ike as of today.
The President perked up at this,
asked to keep the clipping.
It was after this barrage that
the President remarked his friends
were making it tough on him.
While Eisenhower definitely did
not agree to run, he did agree to
make no announcement regarding
his intentions until after Congress
adjourns. This was in response to
a suggestion that he could control
Congress better if he kept Con-
gress guessing and if GOP die-
hards thought he would run.
There was also considerable dis-
cussion about broadening the Re-
publican Party's appeal, since they
could not rely on Ike's popularity
forever.
WANTED: "DYNAMIC PARTY"
THE PRESIDENT himself spoke
at length about bringing in
young blood-new dynamic can-
didates-and about party harm-
ony.
He used the word "dynamic"

several times in describing the
kind of party he wants. The way
to build .this "dynamic" party,, it
was agreed, was to work within
the framework of the present GOP
machinery-they must avoid a
break with the old guard.
Ike urged everyone to go out
and work for party harmony. The
best way of increasing public ap-
peal for the GOP, he said, was to
steer a course down the middle of
the road.
T h e Republican watchword
would continue to be Ike's phrase,
"progressive moderation."
(Copyright, 1955, by the Bell Syndicate)

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 17 to January 27, 1955
Foi courses having both lectures and recitations, the time of
class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule,
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

MONDAY
TUESDAY

SPEC
Literature,
English 1, 2
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Russian 1
Political Science 1
Sociology 1, 54, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11, 31
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23
Psychology 31

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Wednesday, January 19
Saturday, January 22
Tuesday, January 25
Monday, January 17
Tuesday, January 18
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Monday, January 24
Wednesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Monday, January 17
CIAL PERIODS
Science and the Arts
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Saturday,January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 26

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

English 11
Drawing 3
M.I.E. 136
C.E. 23, 151
Drawing 1
M.I.E. 135
C.M. 107
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,'
101, 153
Drawing 2
E.E. 5
P.E. 31, 32
E.M. 1, 2
C.M. 113, 115
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23

Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17,
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January,21
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

i

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5

SPECIAL INSTR'UCTIONS
Literature, Science and the Arts
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building before January 7 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

I

f;

(

,

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
Doctoral Examination for Joseph
Francis Shea, Engineering Mechanics;
thesis: "A Study of Wind Forces on
Suspended Cables and Related Struc-
tures," Tues., Jan. 4, 406 West Engi-
neering Building, at 1:30 p.m. Chair-
man, W. W. Hagerty.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Dori
Francis, Bacteriology; thesis: "Studies
of the Immunological Relationships be-
tween Viruses o fthe Psittacosis-Lym-
phogranuloma Venereum Group," Wed.,
Jan. 5, 1566 East Medical Bldg., at 2:00
p.m.Chairman, W. S. Preston.
Doctoral Examination for Helen
Mary Maertens Wadsworth, Psycholo-

Debate on Pure Poetry, 1925-1930; A
Critical Survey," Wed., Jan. 5, East
Council Room, Rackham Building, at
3:30 p.m. Chairman, R. J. Niess.
Doctoral Examination for James R.
Cretcher, Education; thesis: "A Study
of Salary Schedules Based on- a Cost-
of-Living Index in the Public Schools
of the United States," Tues., Jan. 4,
East Council Room, Rackham Bldg.,
at 7:30 p.m. Chairman, H. R. Jones.
Coming Events
La Sociedad Hispanica will meet
Thurs. at 8 p.m. in the League. Ensian
picture, movies, and dancing. vengani
Episcopal student Foundation. Stu-

gy. "The New Architecture Research
Building." C. T. Larson, School of Ar-
chitecture. Initiation of new members.
Dues received after 7:10 p.m.
Square Dancing tonight and every
Tuesday. 7:30-10:00. Lane Hall.
The Ballet Club will have its regular
meeting at 7:30 p.m. in the dancing
studio on the second floor of Barbour
Gymnasium. The whole club will meet
at this time,
The Stump Speakers Society of gig-
ma Rho Tau invites all engineers, ar-
chitects, and technicians to attend the
meeting Jan. 4, 7:00-8:30 in room 3N
of the Michigan Union. Elections and
a raconteuring contest will be fol-
lowed by refreshments.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan