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January 04, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-04

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1955

THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

PAGE THREE

1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TRUER

Loss

to

Hoosiers

Follows

Holiday

Cage

Successes

Jorgenson, Kramer Spark
Three Vacation Hoop Wins

By NATE GREENE
The University of Michigan bas-
ketball team made the Christmas
Vacation a fruitful one as it won
three out of four holiday games.
Beginning with a tilt against
Washington of St. Louis, the Wol-
verines embarked on a three game
swing through the west. Besides
the St. Louis team, they also
played Denver and Brigham
Young.
After getting off to a shaky
start against Washigton, the
Wolverines broke the game open
with a 26 point splurge in the
last nine minutes. They won, 73-
52. High scorer for the game was
Tom Jorgenson with 23 points.
Kramer in Form r
Especially gratifying to Coach
Bill Perigo was the performance
of Ron Kramer who, because of a
late start, had failed to live up
to pre-season expectations. Kra-
mer hit double figures for the
first time, tossing in 21 points.
The quintet's next stop was
Denver where, despite a 33-point
performance by Denver soph Dick
Brott, it set a fieldhouse record by
running up a 104-point total. The
final score was 104-77.
Michigan sank a much better
than average 42 percent of .its
field goal attempts. Heading the
list of Michigan scorers for the
second straight game was Jor-
genson with twenty-one points.
He was followed by Don Eaddy
who scored 17dpoints and Paul
Groffsky and Jim Barron with 15
points each. Kramer had another
good night as he threw in 12
points.
Meet Brigham Young
With two wins under its belt,
the Michigan team shifted its ac-
tivity from Colorado to Utah,
where it was to face a Brigham
Young team which possessed an
unimpressive two-win, four-loss
record.,
After twice fighting back in the
second half, the Wolverines pulled
within three points of the Cou-
gars. With two minutes remaining
they trailed 60-57. In a desperate
attempt to gain possession of the
ball Michigan team was called for
ten fouls, the B.Y.U. team making
good on all of the charity tosses.
The result was a 70-60 loss for
Michigan, the second of the '54-
'55 season against four wins.
After a short break for Christ-
mas the cagers returned to Ann
Arbor to meet Valparaiso in the
Yost Fieldhouse. The game proved
to be no more than a warm-up
for the Wolverines.
Fast Start
Michigan established a ten-
point lead in the first ten min-
utes and continued to add to it
throughout the rest of the first
half, leaving the floor leading
50-23.
In the second half the Wolver-
ines matched Valpo point for
point, maintaining their 27-point
lead which proved to be the mar-
gin of victory. The final score was
82-55. High scorer in the game
was Forward Ed Eckart of Valpa-
raiso with 18 points, ten of them
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Purdue 109, Bradley 92
Louisville 73, Notre Dame 69
John Carroll 83, Valparaiso 77
Fordham 66, Princeton 56
Duquesne 60, Fort Belvoir 56

Track Men
Break Four
Meet Marks
Four members of Michigan's
trcak squad distinguished them-
selves ' Thursday as they set
records in the annual Unviersity
of Chicago meet held in Chicago.
Ace highjumper Mark Booth
reached a height of 6' 3%", break-
ing the existing mark of 6' 2%".
Sophomore Laird Sloan ran the
440-yard run in :50." to clip .3 off
the old rec: -Lheld by Bob Bailey
of Western Michigan. He set a
:50.6 mak in 1953.
Elles Lindstrom, a freshman
from Finland, cleared 14' 4" in
the pole vault event. The previous
meet record was 13%'.
Dick Flodin, another sophomore,
cracked the 220-yard dash record
with a time of :22.6. Ira Murchi-
son of Western Michigan held the
old record of :23.0 which he set
in 1953.
Pete Gray, crack Wolverine half
miler, last spring, ran the mile
event in 4:19.8 for a first place.
Tom Hendericks took a second
in the low hurdles, Dave Hessler
a third in the 220-yard dash and
Roger Severson a third in the
broad jump.

Barron Disabled; Schlundt
Scores 30 Indiana Points

(Continued from Page 1)

and Shearon all garnered five
fouls each, and were forced out.
Jim Barron sustained the only
injury of the contest. With two
minutes played in the opening per-
GiveawayI

j Michigan Grid Seniors Star
In Post-Season Bowl Tilts

iod, he fell to the floor with a leg
cramp. When he got up, the pain
forced him out of the game.
Shearon replaced him.
Eaddy was the only Wolverine to
play the full game. Schlundt was
taken out for seven minutes in the
final period after he had commit-
ted four fouls, but finishct the
game. No Indiana cager fouled out,
but three Wolverines, Kramer,
Lingle, and Eaddy came within'
one foul of leaving the game.
In the only meeting between the
two schools last year, the chain-
pions from Indiana edged the Wol-
verines, 62-60, on a last minute
tally by Bob Leonard.

MICHIGAN G
Kramer, f-c ... 5
Maentz, f ...... 0
Jorgenson, f ... 6
Groffsky, f .... 3
Lingle, f ....,.. 0 0 4 0
Williams, c .... 2 3 3 7
Eaddy, g ...... 7
Barron, g ...... 0
Shearon, g .... 4
Raisor, g ..... 1
TOTALS ....28
INDIANA G
Choice, f-c .... 2
Bryant, f ...... 1
Barley, f ...... 6
Neal, f ........ 1
Schlundt, c .... 7
Williamson, c . 0
Scott, g........6
Baumgartner, g. 0
Hodson, g......1
Poff, g ........ 2 0
Byers, g........0
TOTALS ....26

F
2
1
4
3
0
3
5
0
3
0
21
F
3
5
7
3
16
0
7
1
0
0
1
43

P
4
0
5
5
4
3
4
0
5
2
32
P
1
1
2
4
0
4
1
3
4
0
21

T
12
1i
161
9
0
7
19
0
11
2
77
T'
7
7
19
5
30
0
19
2
4,
1i
95

Despite the fact that Michigan's
football team failed to win the bid
as the Big Ten's representative in
the Rose Bowl, five Michigan
players did make appearances in
year-end bowl games.
Starring for the North in the
Blue-Gray game were Michigan's
captain of last season, Guard Ted
Cachey, and Fullback Fred Baer,
who was selected as the most
valuable player of last year's
squad. Cachey received another
honor as he was elected co-captain
of the Blue team along with Paul
Matz of Notre Dame.
Baer Stars
Playing from left half, Baer
more than proved his capabilities
as he figured prominently in both
Blue touchdowns. In the Blue's
first touchdown drive, Baer set up
the score with a 12-yard run
which placed the ball on the
Gray's three yard line. Later in
the game Baer assumed the role
of a pass-catcher as he caught
two aerials in the North squad's
move toward a second touchdown,
the second catch being good for'

the score. This touchdown proved
to be &6cisive as the Blues won
14-7.
Representing Michigan in the
annual North-South game at Mi-
ami, was quarterback Duncan Mc-
Donald. The South won, 20-17.
Wrapping up the collegiate foot-
ball season for Michigan were
tackles Art Walker and Ron Gey-
er who played in the East-West
game at San Francisco. Both of
them turned in exceptionally fine
games as they played all of the
first half and most of the fourth
quarter. The fine defensive work
by this pair played a big role in
the game as the underdog East
squad turned back 'the Western-
ers, 13-12.
Turner Wins
NEW YORK (A') - Gil Turner,
fighting in furious bursts, pound-
ed out a unanimous decision over
favored Italo Scortichini last
night in a wild 10-round match
at St. Nicholas Arena. Scortichini
weighed 154%, Turner 154 pounds.

DON EADDY,
... 40 minute man

TOM JORGENSON
... point producer
coming on free throws. Showing
the way for the 'M' five was Kra-
mer who tallied 17 points, fol-
lowed by Williams with 14 and
Eaddy with 13 markers.
Conspicuous by his absence
from the starting line-up was
Capt. Paul Groffsky who did not
start for the first time in three
years. Groffsky was replaced by
Kramer.

CONFERENCE KINGPINS NO LONGER:
Icers Lose Three- Crucial Games In West

OPEN BIG TEN RACE
OSU, Northwestern,
Iowa Down Opponents'
COLUMBUS, Ohio ()-Robin drive that carried Iowa into the
Freeman, the nation's leadingldvtht carrieI alinThe
scorer, made 39 points last night, lead, just before the half. They
sparking an Ohio State win over continued the pace in the second
Michigan State, 83-76, in the half.
opening Big Ten basketball game The Hawkeyes' top marksman,
for both teams. however, was Bill Seaberg, junior
Freeman's scoring stood out in guard, who hit for 22 points.
a fast, hard-fought game in which Wisconsin opened its Big Ten
the two teams shared seven ties campaign Saturday with a 79-64
and saw the lead change 17 4 upset victory ovei' Illinois.
times.I Northwestern 74, Minnesota 72
Working from a slim 42-40 lead EVANSTON, Ill. (R) - North-
at halftime, the Buckeyes did no western stormed from behind with
get final control of the game until aeterndstrelymthonfsta
less than three minutes remained. 10-paint second half Minnesota
Then Freeman started the OSU lead to down the Gophers 74-72 in
scoring surge that carried through an opening Big Ten game for both
to victory. teams last night.
The win boosted Ohio State's The come-from-behind victory,
record to 6-2, while the Spartans overshadowed a tremendous scor-
ing spree by Minnesota's Dick
in seven games. Garmaker. Garmaker set a new
Spartan Albert Ferrari topped McGaw Fieldhouse scoring record
the scoring for the visitors with with 32 points.
28 points. xth3pons
Iowa 86, Wisconsin 69 The previous high of 30 was by
MADISON, Wis. (A' - Sizzling Nori thwestern's Frank Ehmann
hot Iowa's Hawkeyes opened their rdee10thisrseasyn.
Big Ten basketball campaign last Purdue 109, Bradley 92
night by smothering Wisconsin, PEORIA, Ill. A')-Purdue be-
86-69, before a crowd of 11,200. came the first basketball team
The Badgers' Dick Cable led all ever to score 100 points against
scorers with 25 points, but four Bradley as the Big Ten represen-
Hawkeyes counted 14 or more tative blasted the Braves 109-92
points each to balance the scor- last night in a final tuneup for
ing and turn the game into a rout its conference campaign.
in the final moments. Six Purdue players, led by guard
Deacon Davis, who finished Dennis Blind, scored in double
with 21 points, and Carl Cain, who figures. Blind was high for the
wound up with 16, provided the Boilermakers with 26 points.

i

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E1

'PRINTING

KING SIZE SERVICE
Card to a Catalog by
Push Button

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-

By PHIL DOUGLIE
The fall of Michigan as kingpins
the Western Intrecollegiate

IOf

Hockey League became more than
depressing speculation over the'
past Christmas recess as the Wol-
verine pucksters got off to their
poorest league start it a decade.
By losing three out of the four
vital two point games in the Colo-
rado Rockies, Vic Hc '~ters' short-
handed icers find themselves mir-,
ed deep in the league standings as
one of the wierdest r - ~ in recent
years begins to unfold. Only more
trouble lies ahead.
The battered ten-man Michigan
squad went down twice at the
hands of Cheddy Thompson's
league leading Colorado Colleges
Tigers, 4-0, and 5-4 i1i overtime,
and then moved on to Dc- ver,
where the Heyligermen barely
managed to squeeze out a split.
T-- Wolverines nipped the red hot
Pioneers 2-1 ni the opener, and
then wilted ' the second tilt, 8-3.
MSC Tilt- Near
Michigan is currently drilling
for this weekend's bitter duel with
second place Michigan State,1
which calls fo ran East Lnasing
date on Friday night, and a re-
turn engagement in the Coliseum
here Saturday evening.
Three factors conspired to push
the Wolverines down to fourth
plcae in the league standings over!
the vacation period. Th massy
calibre of both Colorado teams,
each of which seems destined to
finish well up the ladder, was ob-
viously the big factor in the Wol-
verine downfall.
In total goals, Michigan was
outscore I 18-9 by the Colorado
teams, which points out the edge

in material and depth held by the
Rocky Mountain boys.
Another factor in the downfall
of Michigan was the untimely loss
of defenseman Bob Schiller, which
weakened the Wolverine back line
to the point of desperation. Schil-
ler, by the way, has recovered from
a cheek fracture. and is c£pected
to be back in the lineup this w ek-
end.

Grind Takes Toll
A third factor wa .-etelling
grind of four games played in less
than a week, all with a short-
handed team in the rarefied at-
mosphere of the Colorado Rockies.
i'he Wolverines used only two
lines.
Meanwhile, the WIHL itself has
turned upside down over vacation.
Once feared Minnesota has plum-
meted to the bottom cf the stand-
ings by losing two, tieing one,aand
winning only one over the recess.
Michgian State and Colorado
College, along with P' nver, appear
to be the class of the league. The
former triumvirate of Michigan,
Minnesota, and North Dakota has
been having lots of trouble, and

all look like second div-ion
at this time.

teamsI

WIHL STANDINGS
W L T
Colorado College. ..S 1 0
Michigan State .. 4 4 0I
Denver ............ 3 4 1
MICHIGAN... 1 3 0
North Dakota 2 2 0
Minnesota-........ 1 2 1
Michigan Tech ... 1 1 0
*Point explanation - When1

*Pts.
8
6
5'.;
I 2
1?
1
teams

The opening game of Michigan's
WIS. L season yaw it take a 4-0
whitewashing job-the first time
a Colorado College team has
blanked the Wolverines in 26
games.
The next night, there occurred
what may be one of the most cru-
cial breaks of the season. The Wol-
verines missed a 4-3 victory and
two great big ponits in the stand-
ings byonly 73 seconds,
At that point, Colorado yanked
its goalie, swept in on Lorne Hawes
with six forwards and scored, forc-
ing the game to go into overtime.
Contrvoersial Penalties
Just 11 seconds before the over-
time, two Michigan men were wav-
ed from the ice on controversial
penalties, and much to Heyliger's
chagrin the Maize and Blue went
into the playoff preiod two men
short. On the opening drive of
the overtime period Colorado scor-
ed, and Michigan had lost its sec-
ond in a row.
On Dec. 22nd, Michigan moved
on to Denver, anr' nipped the
Pioneers 2-1, by scoring in the
first and third perik ~ The goals,
by Bill MacFarland and Yves Heb-
ert, were enough to pickup Mich-
igan's only standing points of the
season,
The next night, Michigan ap-
parently just ran out of gas, for
the Pioneers exploded for eight
goals, riddling the shattered Mich-
ican defenses time and time again.
The three goals that Michigan
tallied were far from enough to
win.
Desperation Line
In the manpower department,
Heyliger in desperation turned to
a line composed of MacFarland,
Tom Rendall, and Jerry 'rpinka,
for scoring punch, but even this
could only produce one win.
Michigan, now down s' 'ioints,
must face Michigan State and
Minnesota twice before the semes-
ter brc ik. At the turn of the se-
mester, Mike Buchanan will join
the club, but how much good he
will do is purely matter for specu-
lation.
Coach Heyliger Aid y cterday
"You can't count us out of the
running altogether, because every
team is capable of beating some-
one else this year. However, the
odtlook for us is not very good."
New Year's
Resolution--1955
We resolve to bring the
finest of barber science to
you, our loyal and coopera-
tive patrons.
The Bascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

II. e " e 4 s- a- a- a

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play each other twice during a sea-
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counts one point to the winner.
9 TO 5: 3 0

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PHONE -NO 2-1013

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AERIAL VIEW OF
MARSHMALLOW ROAST'
Jim De Haas
Michigan State College

M

00O
RABBIT WATCHING
BASEBALL GAME
THROUGH KNOTHOLES
Ann Antine
C.C.N.Y.

STUDENTS! *
EARN $25!

Lucky Droodles* are pour-
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We pay $25 for all we use,
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Lucky Droodle, P.O. Box
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by Roger Price

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C G A RETT E S

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Luckies. That's the word,
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Band and
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C yr r i"____ __ w A

STUDENTS ARE ECSTATIC about
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EsMEMEM."

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