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December 03, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREIR

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3,1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREW

HAND-MADE GOODS:

Ukranian Students' Club
Sponsors Folk Art Show

NATIONALISTS TESH O
-ao TNGCHI
TOUMEN
*WU-PENG 1.
0 _
s ~PAi-CHATI . #
, DESTROYER ES-
YIKIANG5° C R T SUNK.

Handmade popular folk art from
the Ukraine is on exhibit in the
main showcase at the International
Center.
Highlighting the display are a
large inlaid wood cross, two reli-
gious medallions on inlaid frames
and a hand-embroidered scarf.
The colorful Ukranian national em-
blem also has a prominent position
in the exhibit, which is under the
sponsorship of the Ukranian Stu-
dents Club of Ann Arbor.
Hand Made Objects
"Almost every home in the
Ukraine is decorated by such works
of art," Bodhan Pytel, '56, com-
mented.
"In fact," he added, "girls are
taught to embroider while they are
still in grammar school."
Commenting on a blond-haired
doll in the display, Pytel explained
that her bright costume was a copy
of the old method of dress among
his countrymen, now used only in
special dances and national cele-
brations.
Intricate Patterns on Eggs
An unusual feature of the exhib-
it is two handpainted Easter eggs.
Painted with thick paints instead of
the regular egg dye, the design
consists of tiny and carefully fin-
ished geometric patterns.
"The smaller the design, the
more valuable the egg," Pytel ex-

plained. Several observers could
not believe the eggs were real be-
cause of the intricate work.
Other items on exhibit include
embroidered pillow cases, hand-
bags, blouses and inlaid picture
frames.
Life of Gandhi
Shown Today
The life of India's Mahatma
Gandhi will be presented in a full
length dodumentary film to be
shown admission free at 4 and 7
p.m. today in the Union ballroom.
Selected from more than 50,000
feet of film shot in a 37-year pe-
riod, the movie covers the high-
lights of Gandhi's career from his
days as a lawyer in South Africa
to his assassination in 1948. Quen-
tin Reynolds narrates the film pre-
sentation.
Called a tribute to Gandhi's prin-
ciples of practical -idealism, the
movie was produced by the Amer-
ican Academy of Asian Studies in
late 1952.
A panel showing on "After Gan-
dhi, What?" will be held at 8 p.m.
next Friday in the Upion spon-
sored by the groups who have pre-
sented the movie.

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Rice Drama
Set To Open
Wednesday
Elmer Rice's "Dream Girl,"- -
rently in rehearsal under the dir-
ection of its author, will open
Wednesday, Dec. 8, at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater.
A combined student-faculty cast
will appear in Rice's tale of the
real and the day-dream life of a
young girl, -proprietor of an un-
successful bookstore.
Gwen Arner, Grad., will take
the role of the dream girl, Geor-
gina Allerton. The male lead, Clark
Redfield, will be played by John
Olson, '57L.
Two faculty members, Prof.
William Halstead of the speech
department and Prof. Claribel
Biard of the speech department
will appear as the father and
mother who take on other identi-
ties in the dream sequences.
Dream girl's sister is played by
Susan Goldberg, '57, her brother-
in-law, who is one of the day-
dream heros, is Norman Hartweg,
'56.
Ellen Jepson, '56, appears as
Clair Blakeley, Valerie Schor,
Grad., as the Stout Woman, Paul
Rebillot, Grad., as George Hand,
Jay Edelson, '56, as Luigi, Wanda-
lie Henshaw, '56, as the Usher and
Marian Mercer, '57SM, as Miss
Delehanty.
Called by critics a "deft and de-
lightful comedy" Rice's play was
first produced in December 1945
in New York. The Pulitzer Prize
winning playwright's most recent
play, "The Winner" was presented
last year on Broadway.
Tickets for the speech depart-
ment production which will play
Wednesday through Saturday,
Dec. 11, are priced at $1.50, $1.20
and 90 cents. A special rate of 75
cents will be available for students
for the Wednesday and Thursday
performances. Ticket sales begin
Monday at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office.
Engineering Group
Petitions for the Engineering
Honor Council are available in the
vestibule of West Enginering Bldg.
They must be returned before 5
p.m. next Friday to 259 West En-
gineering.

GARRISONED W I T H
1,000 TROOPS; H A S
IMPORTANT RADAR
STATION.
PERIODICALLY BOMBED
BY RED CHINESE.

By LEE MARKS
How many hours determine a
full-time student?
Ten, says the Board of Regents
. . Selective Service counters
with 12, freshmen in the Literary
College need only 11 and Veter-
an's Administration recognizes 14.
Although not normally a prob-
lem, distinctions between full-
time, part-time and special stu-
dents occasionally pose questions of
eligibility.
A typical example arose when
Interfraternity Council considered
initiating a freshman in Literary
College who was carrying 11 cred-
it hours. Student Affairs regulations
declare as ineligible for extra-cur-
ricular activities, "part-time or
special students carrying less than
12 hours." r
Specific Purpose
Assistant Dean of the Literary
College James H. Robertson point-
ed out each definition is framed
with a specific purpose in mind.
A normal load for a full-time
student is considered 15 hours so
that the 120 hours needed for grad-
uation can be accumulated in
eight semesters.
Recognizing the varying needs
of different students, a range of 12
to 18 hours has been established.
"Of course, a series of 12 hour se-
mesters would be bad since it
would prevent the student from
progressing normally towards a de-
gree," Robertson said.
Company of Peers
Several reasons were advanced
for wanting the student to move
normally towards a degree. One,
according to Robertson, is "We
like to think of students moving in
the company of their peers."
Freshmen, because of the pre-
determined nature of their pro-
grams, pose a unique problem.
Normally, freshmen take three
four-hour courses and English, a
three hour course.
Dropping any subject but Eng-
lish (not an elective) reduces the
load to 11 hours, one under the

.I COME 14:
Full-time Student Hours
Subject to Interpretation

number required. Hence, the adop-
tion of a special classification al-
lowing freshmen with 11 hours to
meet "full-time" requirements.
Financial Considerations
The Regents' classification of 10
hours is determined by financial
considerations. According to Dean
Robertson, "It says, in effect, this
is the point at which a student pays
full tuition fee."
Until revised in 1950, Regent By-
Laws applied full tuition fee to
all students taking nine hours or
more.
Further distinction is made be-
tween part-time students and "spe-
cial" students.
Less Than 12 Hours
A part-time student is one taking
less than 12 hours (11 for fresh-
men) but still proceeding. towards
a degree. Before- allowing a stu-
dent to hold part-time status, rea-
son must be shown why the stu-
dent cannot carry a normal load;
Dean Robertson said.
Special students, on the other
hand, may be carrying more than
12 hours but are not candidates for
a degree.
"Special students are usually old-
er, at least 21 years old, and ac-
ceptable for admission but they
want to pursue special interests,"
Dean Robertson noted.
The Veteran's Administration.
ruling is also based on financial
considerations. It has no relation
to school regulations and is mere-
ly the number of hours a student
can carry and still be eligible for
full subsistance under the G.I. Bill
of Rights.
Selective Service has hit on 12
as the number of hours required
for draft deferment. Freshmen, ac-
cording to Dean Robertson, get a
special dispensation if they carry
11 hours.
Eye doctors find that even when
a child's eyes are very defective he
does not complain because usually
he does not know what normal
vision is.

0 1.

I

0 10

GENATIONALIST HELD
COMMUNIST HELD

AP Newsfeatures

I_-1 _.. _.. - _ _ __ _.-_ f
MrYM OrYII ,...+"

Value of Nationalist Islands Seen

I1

By HERMAN R. ALLEN
AP Newsfeatures Writer
When Chiang Kai-Shek and his
Nationalist Chinese government
fled the mainland for Formosa
they managed to hold a string of
rocky islands and islets stretch-
ing 350 miles along the southeast
China coast.
Valuable to the Nationalists as
listening posts, these 20-odd is-
lands of the hundreds along the
coast are sharp thorns in the
Communists' flesh.
Most important among them are
the Tachens at the north, the Mat-
su and Paichuan groups in the cen-
ter, and Quenoy at the southern
end. Some of them within ar-
tillery range of the mainland are
taken under fire by the Reds from
time to time.
Not within artillery range and a
particular irritation to the Com-
munists are the Tachens, 210 miles
north of Formosa and 18 miles off
the mainland. Radar on these is-
lands can pick up Red planes en
route from Shanghai in time to
alert Nationalist interceptors bas-
ed on Formosa.
Principal Islands
As the accompanying map shows,
the two principal islands in the
group are Shang Tachen and Hsia
Tachen. Shang rises some 675 feet
from sea level, Hsia about half
that. Population is about 30,000
and there reportedly is a Nation-
alist garrison of 1,000.
Thirteen miles to the northwest
of the Tachens are Toumen, Tian-
shan and Tungchi islands, all held
by the Red Chinese. The range is
a bit long for Communist artillery
fire upon Shangf or Hsia Tachen
from Toumen, but there is a step-
ping stone in between.
As shown on the map, this is
the tiny islet of Yikiang, held at
present by the Nationalists. If the
Communists conquered Yikiang,
they could bring the Tachens un-
der fire. This is why there has
been so much action in the Tach-
en area recently. Toumen and Yi-
kiang have been firing at each
other while Red planes have been
bombing the Tachens and Nation-
alist bombers raiding Toumen and
Tianshan.
Torpedo Operation
The first serious naval engage-
ment occurred Nov. 14, when Com-
munist torpedo boats operating to
the 'north of the Tachens sank
the Nationalist destroyer escort

Taiping, formerly the U.S.S. Deck-
er. After limping southward for
several hours, the Taiping went
down 10 miles north of Hsia
Tachen.
Unlike Quemoy to the south, the
Tachens are deep water islands
with rugged shores easily defend-
ed against sea attack. But the Na-
tionalist Interior Ministry reports
the Communists have moved 11,-
000 paratroopers and 120 trans-
port planes to mainland positions
opposite the Tachens. The Nation-
alists are convinced the Reds are
planning a major move.
Just last week the Reds made a
foray against the tiny islet of
Wuchiu,
U. S. Move?
What would the United States
do if the Communists made an all-
out attack against the Tachens or
other coastal islands? The U.S.
7th Fleet is committed to defend
Formosa and the neighboring Pes-
cadores Islands,, and American
planes patrol the whole string
from Quemoy to Shanghai, but of-
ficial American policy on the
smaller islands has not publicly
been disclosed.
If the Reds launched a full-
fledged assault on all the coastal
islands at once it might be con-
sidered an open-and-shut case,
virtually the same as an attack
on Formosa itself.
But what if the Reds try knock-
ing them off one by one?

So far at least, U.S. policy seems
to be to keep the Reds guessing as
to just how far they can go with-
out trouble.
According to AP Correspondent
Spencer Moosa at Taipeh,. For-
mosa, one thing is certain:
"Nationalistadeteriination to
hold these islands, and Commu-
nist determination to liquidate
them, combine to create the most
explosive potential since the Na-
tionalists took refuge on Formosa
in 1949."

THIS WEEKEND

Visit the

HILLEL
MIDTERM MIXER
with
Mel Sachs and His Orchestra
DANCING
REFRESHMENTS
Sunday, December 5th -8 to 10:30
25c - members, 35c -non-members

For after the game entertainment
DANCING
Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday Night
Open 2 P.M. to 2 A.M.
Members of V.F.W. and their guests

Mary Lou, Your featured vocalist. Don Bailey, Your singing host

VtrlUB

314 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor
Phone NO 2-3972--You must be 21
"Ann Arbor's Most Popular Club"

I

1

Smart To Give Or To Own...
Handsewn Leather Gloves
Deftly cut of superb land-picked skins:
A. Genuine peccary pigskin
tailored slipons. Cork, oatmeal, white. $5.

4'~
A~4E~ft~~ 4~4~4#E& ~ 4~fIk A

noel

moderne

F.
:

B. Four-button capeskin dressmakers
in black, beige, pink, ice blue. $6.
C. Hand-finished peccary
pigskin slipons. Cork or oatmeal. $5:
D. Whipsewn capeskin casuals
in tan with black, black with white. 6.95
E. Handsewn capeskin in tan,
black with white, grey with black. $5.
F. Unlined capeskin in

9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
r december 11th

r

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