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December 02, 1954 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-02

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'AGE iSVC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 195

AGE SIX [lIE MIC1IIGAI~I DAILY THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2,1954

ONCE ON BURIAL GROUND:
bStrange Monument Rieb i

Standing directly east of the
University Library is a weather-
scarred column generally ignored
by the student body.
Made of limestone and set on
a square base containing four
plaques, the column is about
thirteen feet high. The truncated
shaft, a cenotaph, was erected on
the University grounds over a
hundred years ago.
Exposed to rain and snow, the
plaques on the base of the column
are so worn that only a few words
of the Latin inscriptions upon
them can now be deciphered,
among them the names of four
men: Joseph Whiting, Douglas
Houghton, Charles Fox, and Sam-
uel Denton.
Men's Lives Included
The reason for the column's
erection is tied up with the lives
of these four men, especially
Houghton and Whiting. A great
many memorials have been erect-
ed on the 'U' campus but few have
the unusual history and back-
ground of the cenotaph.
Joseph Whiting, a graduate of
Yale, was a Presbyterian minister
and the principal of a branch of
the Universityat Niles until 1841.
At that time he caine to Ann Arbor
and became a professor of Greek
and Latin.
The Board of Regents resolved
that "the Executive Committee (of
the Board of Regents) be author-
ized to put up a monument to
Prof. Whiting at an expense not:
to exceed $100, and with the assent
of Mrs. Whiting to cause his body
to be removed to the University
Burial Ground."
Houghton - Geologist
Three months after Whiting
died, Douglas Houghton, professor
of chemistry, minerology, and
geology, and State Geologist of
Michigan, drowned in Lake Su-
perior during a violent storm.
Houghton was one of the first to

Education's
n'U' History Foundation
in the center of the campus burial
ground. This was a plot of land
located slightly east of the center
of the campus which had been set By MARGE PIERCY
aside for use as a cemetery for
Michigan faculty members when "Besides United States' educa-
the, cenotaph was provided for. tion having a much broader base
Whiting was to have been the than in any other country, facili-
first occupant, but his body was ties are also better and standards
never placed there because of ob- equally as high," University Pres-
jections to removing it from the ident Harlan Hatcher said Tues-
family lot where it was originally day.
interred. Commenting on a speech by
Cemetery Use Unknown Field Marshal Viscount Mont-
It is uncertain whether the lot gomery in which he compared
was ever used as a cemetery-Uni- English and American systems of
versity officials say that records education and criticized the ideal
do not substantiate the clains that of "equality of opportunity in edu-
three professors are buried there. cation," Hatcher stressed the point
A plaque for Charles Fox, the that while our system gives wider
University's first and only agri- opportunities to the less gifted, it
culture professor, was added in has ample facilities for the bril-
1854. Originally from England, Fox liant."
came to the United States at an In Montgomery's speech, which
early age and became an Episcopal hedeliveredafter recei ia
minister, rector of his own parish, hnorary degree from Columbia
and assistant to the Bishop of University last week, the field
Michigan. marshal accused the American
Interested in agriculture, Fox educational system of failing the
edited a farm journal. In view of intellectually able, lumping all
his interests, he was appointed a boys into one common school in
professor, but died a few months the .hope that the leaders will
later, 39 years old. emerge from the muck."
]Final Space Filled Notes Improvement
Only one space was left on the Prof. Kent W. Leach, assistant
cenotaph, and upon the death of director of the Bureau of School
Dr. Samuel Denton, it too was Service, noted that despite a dan-
filled. Denton was a member of ger in our particular system of
the medical staff from 1850 until overlooking the gifted child as well
he died, 57 years old, ten years as the retarded one by sheer
later. A professor of medicine and weight of numbers, he has noticed
'pathology, a member of the Uni- a steady improvement in the cali-
versity's first Board of Regents, ber of teaching.
and Stte Snat memerProf. Leach, whose job has led
and a State Senate member. . him to vii 500 schools in the past
When this final slab was set in ix yoasitfe00schaosin the pm-t
Fplace the cenotaph had been six years, feels that if the im-
moved to the second of the six provement he has noted in teach-
places it was to occupy before it; ing technique and attitude con-
was settled permanently. This was tinues, Montgomery's objections
i about 165 feet north of the original will soon be completely invalid:
site, the column being moved to "British Viewpoint"
make room for the chemistry "A typically British point of
building (now the economics- view," was the comment of Prof.
pathology building). William Clark Trow of the educa-
In 1869 it was moved north tional psychology department, on
about 100 feet across the walk, Montgomery's charge. "It's the
from the northwest corner of the opinion of those who favor educa-
West Medical Building. tion of an elite group only. It's
Again in 1884, it was trans- up to the people," he continued,
ferred to the center of campus al- "and we don't like to think of
most directly in front of the li- citizens as muck."
brary where it stood until 1890. According to Prof. Stanley Di-
In that year it was moved to the! mond of the School of Education,
south side of the library, near the "America has never tried to de-
southwest corner. Finally, in 1910, velop 'an aristocratic pattern of
it was moved once more, this time education' since that would be a
to its present site. denial of principles."
Events Today

HI

r

"THE TALL BRIDGE" is one of the 150 Whistler prints now on
view at the Museum of Art, Alumni Hall. These lithographs
and etchings were bequeathed to the University in 1936 by Mar-
garet Watson Parker, and are exhibited ror the first time here.
The bridge above is the old Battersea Bridge, a lithotint, drawn
in 1878.
Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 2 to 5 p.m.
Sundays. The Whistler exhibit will be on view until Jan. 2.
Better Culture Understanding
Promoted by Language Study

WHAT IS IT?

discover copper in the upper pen-
insula, and it was rumored that
he also found gold deposits which
he did not have time to make
public before his death, which oc-
curred when he was thirty-six.
The premature deaths of both
Whiting and Houghton probably
account for the monument's bro-
ken column which signifies a life
untimely ended. Plaques commem-
orating the two men were placed
on the cenotaph at the same time,
shortly after Houghton's death.
When the monument was fin-
ished early in 1846, it was placed

I

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a series of articles explaining the
new Literary College's language re-
quirement and illustrating the var-
ious language-training systems.)
By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
and SHIRLEY CROOG
Speaking on the importance of
languages in every day life, Ernest
N. McCarus, instructor in Near
Eastern languages, stressed the de-
sirability of "knowing other peo-
ples-and the best way to do this
is through their languages."
"A knowledge of a ne'w culture
provides a basis of comparison for
our own, leading to introspection,
self-awareness and more effective
citizens," he said.
"Our University offers a student
an excellent opportunity to become'
acquainted with Near Eastern life
and culture. As far as I know, it is
the only university in the country.
that gives classes in both colloquial
and literary Arabic.
SGC-SL Question
Major campus organizations
have organized an all-out cam-
paign to equip the student body
with a thorough background of
knowledge for the vote between
Student Government Council and
Student Legislature, set Dec. 8-9.

In addition there are courses in
modern Persian, Assyro-Babylon-
ian cuneiform, Ugaritic, Biblical
Hebrew, Aramaic, and Sanskrit."
Near Eastern students have
many unusual study aids. A na-
tive informant, Adele Haddad,
works with the Arabic class three
times a week. "The students imi-
tate her pronounciation and
speech patterns," McCarus ex-
plained.
Students Interested
"One advantage our department
has is that our classes are small-
we have eight people in the first
semester Arabic class," he said.
"These people have an intense
interest in learning the language.
They are not taking the course
only to pass a requirement. Some
learn the language out of aca-
demic curiosity. Others need it for
work in the Near Eastern field."
Difficulties encountered in Ara-
bic are different from those in
European languages. "There is no
great common body of vocabulary
in English and Arabic.
No Similarity
McCarus explained that this
lack of language similarity is com-
pensated "by a relatively easy
basic pattern of word structure.
Once you master the structures,
vocabulary building becomes very
simple."

II
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HIGH-FASHION TIMEPIECES
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National Institutional Teacher
Placement Association will hold its
second conference and business
meeting in the Union. The meet-
ing will begin at 9:15 a.m.
Prof. Frank L. Huntley of the
English department will lecture on
"Heavenly and Earthly Fire," in a
series of 17th Century readings,
at 4:10 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.!
Under the auspices of the zool-
ogy department Prof. Allen S. Fox
of Michigan State College will
speak on "Pseudo-Allelism, Opera-
tionalism, and the Gene Concept"
at 4:15 p.m., Aud. C, Angell Hall.
* * *
Students planning trips abroad
next summer will hear tips from
students with traveling experience
at a joint Union-Student Legisla-
ture travel show, 7:30 in the
Union Ballroom,
Included on a student panel of
travel experts will be: Don Carl-

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The panel members will discuss
their various trips and will ac-
company their talks with slides.
The show was planned by Sheila
Cummins, '56, of the SL Interna-
tional Committee and Gus Giana-
karis, '56, and Jim Brady, '57, of
the Union Social Committee.
Prof. John F. Muehl of the Eng-i
lish department and Buddha V.
Govindaraj, Grad., will discuss
"India's Position in the Clash be-
tween East and West" at the
Young Democrats meeting, 7:30
p.m. in Rm. 3R of the Union.
Prof. Phillip Gerhardt, bacteri-
ology instructor, will give a Phi
Sigma Society lecture on "Cellular
Permeability in Bacteria" at 8
p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Opera Ushers
All men who wish to usher for
the Union Opera, December 8, 9,
and 10 may contact Howard
Boesberg, '56, at the Union Opera
Office in the Union or at NOl
3-8786.

1

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'I-

son, '58D, Donna
Stan Leiken, '55,;
'5.5L.

10

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and Irv Stenn,

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Candidates must meet entrance
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Each appointment is for twelve
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for the Howard Hughes Fellowships in
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