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December 02, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-02

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2,1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WAt'4W Ell tW

T. ICIA lAL

FAGS IFYVE

F,

League To Present
First Christmas Party

GOLDMAN'S 'MICHIGAN':

Union Holds Song Lyrics Contest

"Best wishes for all" will be ex-"
tended at the first all-campus
League Christmas Party, to be held
from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 12
in the League.
The party has been planned for
students, faculty, administration
and their families, and will in-
elude dancing, caroling and a spe-
cial floor fQr children.
Christmas Decorations
Decorations in the Women's
League will consist of greens in
each of the wood panels on the
first and second floors, highlight-
ed with silouettes of silver angels
and the traditional wreathes.
Club To Sponsor
Holiday Reception
A Pan American theme will pre-
vail at the annual Faculty Night
party to be given by the Newman
club from 8 p.m. to midnight to-
morrow at the Father Richard
Center.
Latin American students have
been invited to attend the faculty
reception which will be combined
with a dance.
Refreshments will be served at
intermission.
Mary Anne Mulcahy, publicity
chairman, urges all Newmanites
to take advantage of this oppor-
tunity to become acquainted withj
the faculty members who will be
honored guests for the evening.

Students and faculty will dance
to the music of Red Johnson and
his orchestra in the Michigan
Room, while the Hussey Room
will be open to everyone for the
singing of traditional Christmas
carols, led by several prominent
campus singing groups. Silver mu-
sical notes and a large caroling
book will lend atmosphere to the
Hussey Room.
Refreshments will be served in
the Vandenberg Room on the sec-
ond floor, and an international
students' display of Christmas
customs in other countries will be
the main feature in the Ballroom.
Children's Floor
The third floor will be especial-
ly for children, with Santa Claus
using the Library as his "north
pole workshop." A photographer
will take pictures in a variety of
holiday backgrounds in the Kala-
mazoo Room, and Christmas mov-
ies will also be shown.
Programs will guide party-ers
to the correct rooms, and an en-
joyable afternoon is planned for
everyone, according to the League
Council.
This is the first year that an
all-campus Christmas party has
ever been attempted, and its suc-'
cess will depend on the turn-out
of every student, faculty and ad-
ministrative head, Nan Schiller,
first vice-president of the League
said.

1
1
5
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1
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By JANE FOWLER
With the hope of adding anoth-
er great march to the University's
musical tradition, the Union is
sponsoring a contest to find appro-
priate lyrics to Dr. Edwin Franco
Goldman's stirring new composi-
tion, "Michigan."
Dr. Goldman, writer of such not-~
ed marches as "On the Mall," in-
troduced his piece at a band con-
cert presented last spring in Hill
Auditorium.
Since that time, the march has
gained in popularity throughout
the country. Presented at football
games this fall by the Michigan
Marching Band, it is soon to be
played by the University of Illi-
nois band in its annual program.
Thus far, the march has not had
lyrics, Sharing the opinion of
many students and alumni, the
public relations committee of the
Union decided that words would
add much to the tune and capture
the spirit of the march. Under the
leadership of Lee Tenenbaum and
David Hubly, the Union is con-
ducting a search for lyrics that
wiil help to make the new "Michi-
gan" as much a favorite as "The
Victors" or "Varsity."
The contest is open to all Uni-
versity students, alumni and facul-
ty. Prospective Hammerstein's may
pick up the melodic line, a por-
tion of the trio of the march, at
the Union Student offices.
Because of the limited supply, a
complete copy of the score is not
available to everyone. If entering
lyricists desire to see the entire
score, they may contact Tenen-
baum.

-Daily-Dean Morton
IN THE FOUNDRY LABORATORY-Senior women in the College
of Engineering, Carley Meikle and Anne Campbell, observe re-
cordings of a machine in the University foundry laboratory.
U' Women in Engineering
School Brave 116 to 1 Ratio

Completed lyrics should be
brought before 5 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan, 5 to the Student Offices. In
addition to a typewritten copy,
words should be written under the
music so that judges can follow
the words as they are intended to
be sung.
Lyrics selected will be officially
set to the music for publication.
The writer, will have his name as
lyricist on published copies.
The march will be played at the
first football game next fall when
Dancing, Shows
To Add Gaiety
To Soph Weekend
New ideas will add to the tra-
ditional sophomore weekend, Soph
Scandals, when two evenings of
dancing to the music of two or-
chestras, double-feature floor-
shows and refreshments provide
entertainment for University co-
eds Friday and Saturday.
This year Red Johnson and his
orchestra will provide music us-
ing the arrangements of Paul Mc-
Donough's former orchestra, in the
main Ballroom of the League.
Earl Pearson and his band will
play soft dance melodies, similar
to the style of George Schiring
and King Cole, in the Vandenberg
Room.
Originally, the sophomore week-
end started in 1927 and took place
in Angell Hall or Barbour Gym.
During the war the sophomore
production was discontinued.
Until this year, the weekend was
called Sophomore Cabaret. Ac-
cording to Pat Sackandy, publicity
chairman, the name was changed
to Soph Scandals because of the
aew traditions included in this
year's presentation.

spectators will receive copies of the
new words free of charge.
The Union officials point out
that this contest is different from
most competitions in that the sig-
nificance of the winning entry will
last long after the prize has been
awarded. Tenenbaum said, "The
writer will be recognized in cam-
pus, alumni and other publications
of interest to Michigan and her
friends, thus becoming part of
Michigan's vast tradition."

"NOW...
Is the time to go to Follett's
Bookstore for the most wonder-
ful selection of personal Christ-
mas Cards in town. Fifty lines
to choose from. Get the best
-Get them at-
W FOLTTS
State St. at North University
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

! I !."

11

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By ROSE PERLBERG
Imagine spending approximate-
ly seven hours a day, five days a
week studying in a school where
the ratio is 116 men to every wo-
man.
The 19 coeds in the College of
Engineering find this environment
stimulating and interesting for
classwork.
Back in 1952 when the College
of Engineering, then combined
with the College of Architecture,
was added to a strictly literary
curriculum, the idea of a woman
choosing engineering as a profes-
sion was remote.
Women Engineers
The first woman to break the
ice, Marian Sara Parker, received
her B.S..in Chemical Engineering
in 1895. Following in her footsteps
are such well-known personalities
as efficiency expert Lillian M. Gil-
breth, author- of "Cheaper by the
Dozen." She received an honorary
Masters Degree in Engineering
from the University in 1928.
Women entering the College of
Engineering have a long, hard
grind ahead and many hours ofj
midnight oil to burn before they
attain their goal, engineering col-
lege coeds commented. Freshman
Elizabeth Palmer considers the
work far from discouraging. When
asked if being the only woman in
many of her classes affected her
work, she replied, "As soon as the
fellows realize that you're not
there just to get married, they ac-
cept you as part of the class."
When Norma Bennis, now a jun-
lor and a major in mechanical en-
gineering, transferred from Hofs-
tra College in New York last year,
she faced many problems of ad-j
justment.
Adjustment to Michigan
"In the first place," she said,
"the work is much more difficult,
but professors are understanding
and helpful." Miss Bennis gained
practical experience this summer
working as a draftsman.
Anne Campbell, senior in math-
ematics and mechanical engineer-

ing has shown that a woman can
get as far as a man in engineer-
ing college. President of the Engi-
neering Honor Council, the only
woman member of the Engineering
Council and vice-president of the
fSenior class are some of her acti-
vities. Miss Campbell eventually
hopes to become a research worker.
Carley Meikle, the only other
senior woman, does exercises "so
that I can work the machines in
one of my classes." Mrs. Meikle,
an industrial engineering major,
enjoys mixing marriage with her
engineering courses, and even
finds time to be associate editor of
the "Technic," the engineering
college magazine, and secretary of
the American Society of Mechani-
cal Engineers.
Masculine Side
.No story would be complete
vithout the man's side. Paul Barth,
a sophomore in mechanical engi-
neering, says women "promote the
competitive spirits of the men and
ict as an incentive for them to do
better work."
John Kelingos and Dave Gerar-
duzzi, freshmen in civil engineer-
ing and mathematics respectively,
don't think a coed belongs in the;
College of Engineering. "Girls are
too sensitive," they declared, "and
have trouble keeping up with the
work and stiff physical grind."

I

,4cro'44 Camipo

I

ISA TEA - The International'
Students Association and the In-
ternational Center will present
their weekly tea from 4:30 to 6
p.m. today at Rackham Hall. So-
cial dancing and refreshments will
comprise the entertainment.
* *
VOLLEYBALL-There will be a
volleyball challenge game at 8
p.m. today between Alpha Chi
Omega II and Couzens I.
MODERN DANCE CLUB-Mo-
dern Dance Club will meet at 7:30
p.m. today in Barbour Gym.
CAMP COUNSELORS-There
will be a meeting of the Camp
Counselors Club at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in Barbour Gym to finish
plans for an "overnight" planned
for Dec. 10. Anyone interested in
going should bring $2.25 to the
meeting.

11

LAST WE EK TO ORDER YOUR
I m p o s - R li g i u s - -
''- Tall Cards Boxed Assortments
Also Children's Cards,
SE.f::~~ Ch ristmnas Notepaper,
~~ Enclosures and Money Folders
RA MmS Amy PRINTER.S, Inc.
19 E. Liberty Street Ann Arbor

I-

1

Ii

TRAVEL RALLY

Europe

1955

Discussions-Film Showing
Refreshments
DECEMBER 2nd 1954 at 7:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
Sponsored by Student Legislature and
BOERSMA TRAVEL SERVICE
12-14 Nickels Arcade - Ann Arbor, Michigan

Diving,

Cl

I

ub

IL--

j

There will be an organiza-
tional meeting of the Diving
Club at 3 p.m. Friday in the
pool. All those interested are
invited to attend.

.a.

1I

. AND HOW IT STARTED. FRED BIRMINGHAM says:
"I've wanted to be an editor ever since I worked on a boy's magazine
at age 8. After being an editor of the Dartmouth literary magazine (The Dart),.
I set my sights on Esquire. It took 18 years of hard work to achieve
the editorship - after struggling as a newsmagazine cub, cartoon and
essay writer, advertising copy writer and trade paper editor."

For that big weekend of the dorm formals .. .
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EDITOR OF Esquire MAGAZINE

v

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11

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II

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