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November 21, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-21

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MICHIGAN DAILY

StIMAY, NOVEMBER 21,1954

SIX TW MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21,1954
F ~n Students

EWEN OFF THE STAGE:
Harmony Prevails in Stanley Quartet

Engineers Scarce on Today's Market

By MARY LEE DINGLER
Four years ago engineering grad-
uates flooded the market.
Today, two years after the close
of a "police action" and as a re-
sult of the de-emphasis on engineer-
ing education, there's a severe
shortage of engineers. Because of
the current demand, engineers are
the highest-paid professional men
in the country, excepting physi-
cians.
Many factors have combined to
produce the present shortage. Aft-
er World War II, returning GI's
swamped the country's engineer-
ing schools. By 1950 there were
more graduates than jobs avail-
able.
Discouraged Students
High school and college counsel-
ors began to discourage .students
from entering the engineering
field.
This program was so effective
that the sudden "police action"
found the country unable to supply
the engineers which were so badly
needed.
Current procedence of universal

military training over selective
service has also influenced the
present shortage.
While the engineering.student has
an excellent chance of obtaining
his bachelor's degree, it is more
than likely that he will be drafted
before entering graduate school.
Research Abandoned
Although the shortage of engi-
neers has benefited industry by
encouraging the more effective use
of technical personnel, it has also
Frye To Discuss
Persian History
Under the combined auspices of
the Department of Near Eastern
Studies and the Fine Arts Departt-
ment, Richard N. Frye will speak
at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater on "The Per-
sian Renaissance of the 11th Cen-
tury A.D."
Frye is an Associate Professor
of Middle Eastern Studies at Har-
vard University.

resulted in the abandonment of
many research projects.
This shortage also has some in-
ternational implications. Soviet
Russia, now challenging the United
States' position of a world leader
in scientific development, is also
producing more engineers per an-
num. Communist China has some
70,000 students enrolled in her en-
engineering schools and colleges.
At the present time an extensive
advertising campaign to remedy
the situation is being conducted.
For the past five years, the Engi-
neering Manpower Commission and
other organizations have been mak-
ing serious efforts to correct the
deficiency.
These groups have stressed the
importance of engineers to national
technology and have pointed out
our increasing dependence on their
services.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Foreign Students
Will Discuss Health
Foreign students from countries
all over the world will gather for
a Public Health Assembly at 4
p.m. tomorrow in the Public Health
Auditorium to discuss health pro-
grams in their native regions.
The assembly is sponsored by the
School of Public Health.

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TUNING UP-Faculty string quartet members rehearse before performance.

By HENRY FINNEY
Although members of the Stan-
ley Quartet must make many deci-
sions and solve many problems
during their practice sessions,
they're always able to resolve their
disagreements cheerfully.
If there is a disagreement about
whether the "ping" should be at
the beginning or the end of a
VFW SAYS:
Plaln Query
In Hospitals
"Extremely disgusted" by the
Veterans' Administration neglect
of Michigan war veterans, the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars will demand
a congressional inquiry into hospi-
tal facilities in the state, it was an-
nounced this week by state VFW
commander.Leon B. Buer of Grand
Rapids.
"Michigan veterans have been
slighted by the VA and its con-
gressional delegation on necessary
beds for mentally-afflicted veter-
ans," Buer explained.
"High VA officials promised two
years ago," he said, "that existing
Michigan facilities would be full
to 93 percent of capacity. As of
last month, however, facilities
were ,operating at little more than
65 percent of capacity."
Local VA hospital administra-
tors say that the 500-bed Ann Arbor
hospital is not limited to mental
patients, and not filled to capaci-
ty because it's just been activated.
Meanwhile, recent wide publici-
ty on the "forgotten men" in the
hospitals has led a group of De-
troit residents, laden with gifts, to
the Battle Creek veteran's hospi-
tal today. 1,700 items have been
donated and gift-wrapped for a pre-
Thanksgiving party there.

phrase, or if the movement should
be "fast or juicy," the Quartet
members vote. If the vote is even,
they 'flip a coin. No member of
the quartet is subordinate to an-
other.
The Quartet's four members are
Prof. Gilbert Ross, first violinist,
Prof. Emil Raab, second violinist,
Prof Robert Courte, violist and
Prof. Oliver Edel, cellist, all mem-
bers of the School of Music.
Experience Told
Prof. Ross, pupil of Leopold
Auer, taught at Cornell University
and Smith College before he came
to the University in 1942. Another
member, Prof. Raab, '48SM, won
the Stanley Medal, highest music
school award, when he was at the
University. He toured extensively
in Michigan and was concertmas-
ter of a United States Army orch-
estra in England before joining
the University's faculty in 1949.
Violist Prof. Courte, as a fac-
ulty member of the Brussels Con-
servatory of Music, toured Europe
with the Gertler Quartet of the
Conservatory. He was with the Pa-
ganini Quartet from 1946 to 1950,
when he joined the University fac-
ulty.
Prof. Edel, cellist, after touring
and recording extensivelyuwith
both the Manhattan and Roth
Quartets, joined the University
staff in 1947.
Because "we can't live only on
the fruits of past eras," Prof. Ross
said, the University tries to en-
courage contemporary composing
and public interest in contempor-
ary music by each year commis-
sioning one work by a modern
composer to be premiered by the
Stanley Quartet.
Interpretations Merged
One of the Quartet's greatest
difficulties is to compromise each
member's interpretation of a com-
poser's work so that the final per-
formance is not lifeless and dull.

Remembering some of the Quar-
tet's amusing experiences, Prof.
Raab said, "Somebody always for-
gets something." Once on tour
Prof. Edel opened his suit case to
find only two left shoes. Prof.
Courte once appeared for a con-
cert in a white dress coat instead
of the proper black one.
"People thought I was the leader
of the band," he said.
Itinerary Told
After performing in Charleston
(W. Va.) earlier this year, the
Quartet will play at Princeton
University early in December.
Later that month they will play
for the American Musicological
Society in Ann Arbor. Along with
its Beethoven series in Ann Arbor,
the Quartet has been repeating the
series for the benefit of Detroit
audiences.
Both the Princeton and the
AMS program include Prof. Ross
Lee Finney's "Quartet No. 6." Prof.
Finney is Composer-in-Residence
at the University.
Today's concert at 3:30 p.m. in
Rackham Lecture Hall will be the
Quartet's fourth in the Beethoven
series. The program will include
"Quartet in F major, Op. 18,"
"Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 74"
and "Quartet in A minor, Op. 132."
WAA Volleyball
As the Women's Athletic Associ-
ation volleyball tournament reach-
es its end, three games are sched-
uled for the early part of this
week.
In the "B" Finals, Alpha Chi
Omega II will play Yost House to-
morrow at 7:15. At the same time,
Couzens II will meet Mosher II for
the "A" semifinal:. Winner of that
game will play Couzens I at 7:15
p.m. Tuesday, according to Paula
Stoong, '56, volleyball tournament
manager.

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