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November 19, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-19

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMR1

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1954 THE MICHIGAN BATTY FAC~E TWRI!U

s, sav[aJ saasva ,}al

FM

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT:
High School Students Start Businesses

Desegregation Reactions
Vary in Southern States

T ELU.E !/'4

4.

By TAMMY MORRISON

"Learn by doing" is the motto of
160 local high schoolers who are
members of the Ann Arbor Junior
Aciievement program.
Under the guidance of Glenn
Dickerson, coordinator for the Ann
Arbor center, these juniors and
seniors in High School have formed
their own companies to make, pro-
mote, and sell various products.
JA is run on a nationwide basis
with 1,816 companies made up of
31,000 teen-agers in 25 states. The
Ann Arbor center, which has been
operating for two years, has eight
companies which make and sell
everything from "kiddie clothes
trees" to hamburger presses.
Students Make Decisions
"The ideas all come from the
kids t'hemselves," Dickerson said.
"We act in an advisory capacity at
the start, but it's they who decide
what they'll make and how they'll
go about distributing the finished
product."
The eight companies are spon-
sored by seven Ann Arbor con-
cerns, including the University.
They meet once a week, two com-
panies per night, and rotate the
use of workshop failities. Distri-
bution and sales are taken care of
r by door-to-door selling and by get-
ting local firms to carry the prod-
ucts.
University - sponsored Wolvico
Products manufactures bulletin
A
RADIANT
PROJECTION
SCREEN
Give the gift of
glorious, natu-
ral, more brilliant pictures--a Radiant Glass
Beaded Screen. Beautiful, useful, economical
-and guaranteed to last fo years.
A size for every need-a model for every
purse.
"Purchase from Purchase"
PURCHASE
Camera-Shop
1116 S. University
Phone NO 8-6972
*
r -A
of.a 4

FOUR MEMBERS OF THE ANN ARBOR JUNIOR ACHIEVE-
MENT PROGRAM FOLLOW ACHIEVERS' MOTTO
"LEARN BY DOING"

boards and spice cabinets, Ann Ar-
Bell Products makes paint brush
cleaner, Variety Products handles
styrofoam Christmas decorations
and Hoovco produces hamburger
presses.
Makes Christmas Candles
Edico Products makes Christmas
candles, Double A Enterprises pro-
duces aluminum ash trays, K. S.
K i d d i e Products manufactures
children's clothes trees and King
Kraft handles aluminum trays and
dolls.
Each company raises its own

capital by selling stock at 50 cents
a share. -
JA is a leisure time activity and
is planned not to interfere with
school work. In the process of run-
ning their own companies, the
members learn to keep various
business and' production records,
map sales campaigns, conduct ad-
vertising and publicity programs
and prepare financial statements.
Its aim is to combine recreation
with practical business experience
which will aid members in getting
jobs later on.

By SAM REICH
The reaction of the 17 states
which practiced segregation in ed-
ucation prior to the May 17 ruling
of the Supreme Court outlawing
this practice has varied sharply.
The policies of Alabama are gen-
erally aimed at maintaining their
"separate but equal" doctrine.
Gov. Gordon Parsons has indicated
no official action will be taken un-
til a final Supreme Court ruling on
segregation.
However, Dr. Austin Meadows,
recently elected as state superin-
tendent of the powerful State Board
of Education pledged. himself dur-
ing his campaign to "find a legal
way to maintain segregation in our
schools." In the state Senate, a
bill has been tabled to abolish pub-
lic education in favor of subsi-
dizing private education.
To Continue Segregation
Arkansas plans to continue seg-
gregation until integration is ac-
cepted by the people at the local
levels. Some communities have al-
ready begun integration. The state
will continue to work for "sepa-
rate but equal" education until
general acceptance is achieved.
Despite protests and riots, Dela-
ware is prepared to accept the
court ruling. According to Attorney
General H. Albert Young, the "sep-
arate but equal" provisions of the
state constitution no longer apply
in school districts.
Florida and Tennessee have as-
sumed a 'let's-wait-and-see' atti-
tude pending the outcome of state
appeals to the Supreme Court. Ten-
nessee, in its brief to the Court, has
submitted a gradual plan for de-
segregation.
Wait for Court Ruling
At the state level, Maryland has
announced that it will continue its
policy of segregation until the fi-
nal court ruling. Many cities, in-
cluding Baltimore, are formulating
plans for future integration. Start-
ing in February, desegregation will
begin in Missouri. In Oklahoma,
the question of segregation re-
volves around finances; and for the
immediate future very slow inte-
gration is the only prospect.
Virginia and Texas will also con-
tinue segregation until final rul-
ing. In the meantime, in accord-
ance with public sentiment, they
will seek methods to legally con-
tinue this policy.
West Virginia has begun its pro-
gram of peaceful integration. Com-
plete integration is expected by the
1955-56 school year.
Starts Desegregation
In the District of Columbia grad-
ual abolishment of segregation has
been started by the board of edu-

cation amidst much protest. A
court battle is expected to impede
the program which was designed
to be complete by 1955.
The core of the resistance to the
Supreme Court ruling is in Missis-
sippi, South Carolina, Louisiana
and Georgia.
Mississippi and South Carolina
have flatly refused to accept the
decision and are seeking means
to get around it.
Louisiana Resists
Louisiana is on the verge of
adopting a strong resistance plan.
An attempt by Archbishop Joseph
Rummel to desegregate Catholic
schools was thwarted by public
opinion.
And in Georgia segregation is to
continue according to present plans.
Enraged Georgia citizens have
made many proposals. Among
them is a plan to enforce segrega-
tion on the local rather than the
state level.
Another proposal rings of bygone
days-abolish the Supreme Court.
ROTC:
Cadets Initiate
Emergency
Aid Program
By DICK SNYDER
Emergency Mobilization Plan of
Army and Air Force ROTC units
at the University has a present
strength of approximately 800 cadet
volunteers, it was announced re-
Icently by Robert Miller, '55 BAd,
Commanding Captain of Company
D-3, Pershing Rifles.
The plan, originated upon the ini-
tiative of officers of Pershing Ri-
fles, is an expansion of a program
which the joint ROTC organization
has carried out for two years. The
members of PR form the nucleus
of the new program.
Designed to cope with disasters
resulting from such occurrences
as the Flint tornado of 1953 as well
as possible enemy air attacks upon
the in Arbor-Detroit area, the
plan places cadets in various spe-
cialty groups, according to their
individual rbilities and talents.
Thus, for instance, a pre-med or
pre-dent student who has taken a
first aid course within the last 18
months would serve as a medical
corpsman.
The program works under the as-
sumption that the introduction to
military organization and disci-
pline, which each cadet obtains
through the ROTC program, is the
basis of an effective group in meet-
ing emergency situations. It also
calls for regular non-technical in-
struction periods by the local Civil
Defense personnel.
Under the program, all Army
and Air Force cadets are required
to fill out an emergency specialty
form at registration, although par-
ticipation is on a voluntary basis.
Approximately 1300 students com-
pleted the forms after the program
was initiated this semester.
cus ::;& enoaatershalaino

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3DAYS 6DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Small brown coin purse with
three important keys attached. Re-
ward. NO 3-0521, Ext. 150. )40A
LOST-Lady Elgin wrist watch, Wed-
nesday, Rackham. Call NO 3-5930 or
1018 E. University. Reward. )38A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Box,
39c; shorts 69c: military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1947 PLYMOUTH four door sedan, radiq
and heater. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)104B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber; radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
tngton. NO 2-4588. )76B
THREE CHOICES-1951 Chevrolets. Ra-
dios, heaters, power glide. All four
doors. The big car lot scross from
downtown carport. Huron. Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)135B
1950 CHEVROLET convertible. Radio.
Top condition, runs very good. The
big car lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )13B
1952 MERCURY. Four door sedan, radio
and heater. Very clean. The big car
lot across' from downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )134B
GIRL'S BALLOON TIRE BIKE. $15. Ph.
NO 3-3132, After five. )145B
FOR SALE-Butter knives, shrimp forks
and soup spoons. Free meal includ-
ed with each setting. Phone NO
3-3381. )147B
FOR SALE-78 RPM Record Collection,
Popular and Jazz, also Walnut Esty
parlor organ, excellent condition $60.
Call NO 2-8262 after 6 p m. )146B
FOR RENT
Deluxe Bachelor Apartment
Will hold two. Building in rear. Pri-
vate entrance. Electric stove, refriger-
ator, Simmons bed. US 23 off Wash-
tenaw Road, between Ypsilanti and
Ann Arbor, Everything new and
clean. $67.50 a month. Available Nov.
19. Phone NO 2-9020. )18D

FOR RENT
3 ROOM APT., Modern building. Wi11
share with grad. woman. Box 2. )14C
COUPLE WANTS to sub-rent apart-
ment, December 18 to January 2.
Write Box 92, Cousins. )5K
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUESTS-Large pleasant
sleeping room-twin beds, next to
tile bath. Call after 4:00 pm. Mrs.
Harold Andrus, NO 8-7493. Clip and
save for future use. )20D
HELP WANTED
A GIRL for general office work. Morn-
ings Call NO 8-6988. )19H
TRANSPORTATION
TWO MEDICAL students would enjoy
sharing expenses and driving to
N.Y.C. for Thanksgiving. J. Gleich
and F. Norman. Call NO 2-3169 after
7:00 P.M. )12G
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing, Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020 Wool
soxs washed also. )8I
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repais.n310
S. State, upstairs. Phone' NO 2-5962.
)102

MISCELLANEOUS
IMPORTED Swiss, Dutch, Belgian,
English Candies. Washington 1
Market. 208 E. Washingtog. Tel
2-2589.)
VISIT THE Curio Shop, 609 E. Ws
ington, two blocks from camps
books, curios and antiques. O
1-5 P.M.)

BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 B. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
PERSONAL
EIGHT MONTH SPECIALS-Life $3.00;
Time and Newsweek $2.00. Student
Periodical, NO 2-3061. )36F
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedrooti homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

PROMPT, ACCURATE
NO 5-4561.

typing service.
) 12I

Top Off Your Evenings
at the
MILK MAID DRIVE-JN
RESTAURANT
Open 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
3730 Washtenaw Near Pittsfield Village
ORDERS TO GO - NO 8-7146

and
Fish
NO
)17L
ash-
us-
Vpn
)18L.

I

1 /'

ie's shouting about
the Marvelous
DRIVEI N
SERVICE

THIS WEEKEND

' 1194t the
For after the game entertainment
DANCING
Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday Night
Open 2 P.M. to 2 A.M.
Members of V.F.W. and their guests
Mary Lou, Your featured vocalist. Don Bailey, Your singing host

KEG BEER
ICE CUBES

"QUICKEST SERVICE IN TOWN"

114 EAST WILLIAM
Phone NO 3-7191

Open 10 to 12
Sunday Noon to 7

Ensian Price
The Ensian staff announces
that the price rise for the 1955
'Ensian from $6.00 to $6.50 will
come December 8 instead of
November 23 as formerly an-
nounced.
There will be an all-campus
sale of the yearbook on Novem-
ber 23.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

VEt*V
CILvB

314 E. iberty St., Ann Arbor
Phone NO 2-8972-You must be 21
"Ann Arbor's Most Popular Club"

.

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

o
_ . "s
, r14

'^%jt

Beats the stuffing oiat of other
transportation! Stormw can't can-
cel your trip. Traffic jams can't
make you miss vacation dates, or
get you back to the campus late.
And it's more fun traveling by
train with your crowd, enjoying
swell dining car meals en route.
Save 25% or More
And this is gravy I Travel home
and back with two or more friends
on Group Coach Tickets. On most
trips of 100 miles or more, you
each save 25% of usual round-trip
rate. Still better, gather 25 or
more to travel long-distance to-
gether on the same homeward

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Holiday parties just ahead. And
you'll want flattering shoes that will
make you the belle of the ball.

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, GClT/7'

WHO ARE
INDUSTRY'S
TOP
YOUNG
SCIENTISTS

Come in and let us fit

you

with

Ten men between the ages of 26 and 40
were featured in a recent national magazine
article which presented a portrait of the
young scientist in America today. These
particular men are a sample of the most
brilliant young scientific minds in industry.
It's interesting to note that three of the
ten are with Bell Telephone Laboratories,
three with General Electric and one each
with four other companies.
The variety of opportunity in research
and other phases of telephone work has
always attracted an unusually high per-
centage of the nation's best young men.
Consult your Placement Officer about
opportunities with Bell Laboratories ..
also with the Bell Telephone Cbmpanies,
Western Electric and Sandia Corporation.
Your Placement Officer will be glad to

gorgeously

smart evening flats.

$791

In Blue or

Black Suede

c1

;]
K r;
M .C 'p+,' '
Y.::

\* d
. ,! 'I

give you details.
THREE OF THE TEN ARE AT BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES-.

Sizes
3to 10
AAAA to B

V 17

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