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November 13, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-13

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LTITRDAY, MOVEMBER 18, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAt'M VTVV

1ATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1 9 MTHE MTCHTGANT BAIT'W P A f±W W1w

Arln ai 1V 5r

MPLOYMENT UP:
Assembly Lines Rolling
t With New'55 Car Models

(4

By JOEL BERGER
Here we go again.
The 1955 automobiles are begin'
ning to file into car dealers' show'
rooms, many of them under wraps
With this event, looked forward t
by many potential buyers, employ-
rnent in Michigan is on the rise
and production in car factories i.
picking up.
,,Last week more than 95,000 carp
were turned out by the motor
state's factories, while 100,000 ox
inore cars have rolled bff assembly
lines this week. Virtually all these
assemblies will be of 1955 models
although a few 1954 cars are being
put together in the annual mop-up.
Cars on Display
Yesterday one of the lolw-priced
cars went on display, while next
week will see showrooms packed
with potential buyers of three mid-
dle-through-high-priced cars and
dne of the "big three companies'
entire line.
For auto workers in Detroit and
other car-manufacturing cities, the
struggle for the automobile-buy-
er's dollar will add up to more em-
ployment. Probably 200,000 more
cars will be produced in the com-
ing year than in 1954, bringing the
1955 sales total to about 5,500,000
cars.
"During last month, production
was only 240,000 cars. Goal set by
the automobile industry for this
month is 510,000, while 615,000
cars will probably be produced in
December.
Lure Buyers
New models will lure buyers to
trade in their old automobiles (by

O
S
r
r
y
e
or
n

car manufacturers' standards, old
is any car made up to 1955) by
bringing out sleeker, lower and
more powerful models.
At least nine 1955 models will
have wrap-around windshields and
will follow through with the "sport
car" look by being lower and
slightly longer. Boosts in power
will range all the way to 250
horsepower. One high-priced mo-
del will feature a new type of sus-
pension.
For those buyers who prefer the
strictly classical sport car lines,
two automobile manufacturers
have already come out with these
models. Sales of these two cars,
one made of fiberglass land the
other of metal, has made a mild
dent in sales of foreign sport cars.
Early Spring
SGC Elections
Are Possile
(Continued from Page 1)

Blood Signup
To Continue
Persons may sign up to give
blood for the campus-wide drive
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega
service fraternity at the League,
Diag, Engine Arch or by calling
the Alpha Phi Omega office from
1 to 5 p.m. on Monday through
Friday at NOrmandy 3-3112.
Individual trophies will be giv-
en to the fraternity, sorority,
women's residence hall, individu-
al house in men's residence hall,
ROTC unit and independent or-
ganization which has the highest
percentage of donors in their
group.
.Students may credit any of these
organizations when signing up to
donate blood. Any number of or-
ganizations may be listed.
Signup will continue until Nov.
23. Students can sign for the do-
nating of blood for any time they
wish from Dec. 6 to 15.
Deferment Exam
To Be Given Soon
Deadline for mailing applica-
tions for the Selective Service
qualifications test is midnight on
Nov. 23.
Full-time students who are reg-
istered in Selective Service and
who wish to request deferment be-
cause of their student status
should apply in person at Local
Board No. 85 at 210 West Wash-
ington in order to secure these ap-
plications. Applications will not
be handled by telephone.
The test will be given on Dec.
9.:
According to a recent directive
from the Defense Department,
seniors planning to enter any
graduate school except medical or
law schools after Jan. 1, 1955, will
have to achieve scholastic stand-
ing in the upper quarter of their
class, or else have scored 80 or
more on the draft test in order to
be eligible for deferment.
Iceland Film
Traveler, lecturer and cinema-
tographer Robert Davis will nar-
rate his recently-completed full
color motion picture travelogue
"Iceland, Capri of the North" at
3 'p.m. Sunday in Pattengill Audi-
torium, 105 South State Street.

The vice-president said he want-
ed an understanding that the plar
could be subnitted to the students
for their opinion. "After getting
this opinion we can go ahead witl
l furtherance of the plan," he said.
Acknowledge Receipt
Regent Eckert then moved ac-
knowledging receipt of the report
and authorization for poll of stu-
dent opinion.
Regents' action means the all-
campus elections scheduled for
Dec. 8-9 will be elections for Stu-
dent Legislature, not SGC. There
is a possibility that the SGC ref-
erendum will be taken at that
time.
SL's Predicament
Commenting on yesterday's ac-
tion SL President Steve Jelin, '55,
had this to say:
"I do not believe that the Re-
rents or Vice-President Lewis rea-
lized what was pointed out to them
time and again, namely the impos-
sible predicament in which they
have put SL.
"In the past the administra-
tion has done nothing to help stu-
dent government. Their sudden in-
terest in strong student represen-
tation has only placed obstacles
in its path.
"I hope the Student Legislature
can face the challenge of a con-
fused student body and an admin-
istration that has consciously done
the confusing."
SGC Membership
Calling for an 18-man council
made up of 11 elected and seven
ex-officio members, SGC would
supplant the present SL and Stu-
dent Affairs Committee as the all-
campus student governing body.
A seven-man review board is pro-
vided for to review actions of the
Council invoving questions of Re-
gental or administrative policy or
the Council's jurisdiction.
SGC would exercise powers of
recognition and withdrawal of
recognition of campus organiza-
tions, coordination and delegation
of activities to be carried out by
student groups, appointing mem-
bers of Joint Judiciary Council
and student representatives to
committees and organizations.
Originate Projects
It would also originate student
projects and express student opin-
ion as well as administer finances
designated for its use and super-
vision.
If the Regents approve the SGC
plan at their Dec. 17 meeting fol-
lowing a favorable student refer-
endum, it would probably be im-
possible to hold elections for the
new body before early March.
The two week dead period and
exams following the Christmas
recess would preclude elections in
January. Since it takes from three
to four weeks to organize an all-
campus election it would at least
be late February or early March
before balloting could take place.

Food Bill
Menu problems at University
Hospital are gigantic.
To prepare the 1,151,583
meals served during the year
at the hospital, a team of 200
full-time and 35 part-time em-
ployes are needed.
Hospital rates are what they
are today because it takes 80,-
370 pounds of coffee, 376,366
quarts of milk, 28,710 quarts of
cream, 32,260 pounds of but-
ter, 7,356 gallons of ice cream,
50,400 dozens of eggs and 234,-
792 pounds of meat each year
to feed University Hospital pa-
tients.
SL Meeting
Delays SGC
Judgment
(Continued from Page 1)
As a matter of practice the Re-
gents don't want to pass some-
thing and then refer it to the stu-
dents for approval by referendum,
he said.
Approach Regents
Lewis told SL members that he
had been authorized by the SGC'
study committee to approach the
Regents and get them to approve
the SGC plan or do the best thing
possible which he could do in that
direction.
He indicated that the committee
had asked him to get Regent ap-
proval for an all-campus referen-
dum.
SL President Steve Jelin, '55, ex-
pressed a varying opinion that the
study committee had authorized
Lewis to present the entire SGC
plan and not to obtain consent for
a referendum without some state-
ment of intention as to the plan it-
self.
Legislature Vice-President Ned
Simon, '55, pointed out that it has
not been necessary in the past for
Regents to approve polls.
Discussing future action for Stu-
dent Legislature, Jelin suggested
joint referendum and SLgelections
Dec. 8 and 9.
First Member - at - Large Ruth
Rossner, '55, reported only 24 pe-
titions had been submitted so far
by prospective candidates.
Many RealtorIs
Won't Accept
Negro Tenants
(Continued from Page 1)

WASHINGTON (R)-Nearly three
thousand supporters of Sen. Joseph
R. McCarthy (R-Wis) gave him a
roaring vote of support Thursday
night at a Constitution Hall rally.
Marching groups waved aloft
such signs as "You Can't Hide
Truth With Censure" and "Gov-
ernment By Gag Has Happened
here."
Denounces Censure
Principal speaker Sen. Herman
Welker (R-Idaho) denounced the
Senate move to censure McCarthy
as "dirty work" and "foul play,"
and predicted that if the censure
resolution now before the Senate
passes, a strong campaign will be
launched to admit Communist
China to the United Nations.
It was a noisy, political type of

rally, with teen-agers joining gray-
haired elders in processions around
the hall.
Meeting was arranged by Rabbi
Benjamin Schultz, director of the.
American Jewish League Against
Communism. Delegations of Mc-
Carthy backers from New York,
Boston and other cities began ar-
riving early Thursday.
The rally originally was billed
as a "March on Washington" but
Schultz said the designation was.
abandoned "because it gave some
people the idea of a crowd of
screaming Red-baiters."
Sen. Welker, one of McCarthy's
chief backers in the four-day-old
censure debate, lauded the Wis-
consin senator as "one of the great-

consin senator as "one of the great-

I

CHEERLEADER LEADS YE
Campus Prepar
RallyDraws 1,1
By LEE MARKS
High-stepping baton twirlers,
bandsmen, chanting cheerleaders,
22. heavily padded players-all will
face "each other today when 97,236
people fill Michigan Stadium at
1:30 p.m.
Football is always colorful in the
Big Ten but seldom does excite-
ment soar higher than for Michi-
gan's annual clash with their in-
tra-state foes, Michigan State.
One of the game's oldest, most
avidly followed rivalries resumes
for the 47th time before the larg-
est crowd in either college or pro
football this season.
Sold Out
For the seventh straight season,
"Sold Out" signs have hung from
ticket windows weeks in advance.
A harried ticket seller said, "Our
phones have been ringing for two
weeks straight with requests-I
don't know how many we've turned
down," and ticket manager Don
Weir estimated more than 1,000
refusals have had to be made.
According to Weir, 24,500 tick-
ets were sent to MSC and sold al-
most immediately. Since many
MSC fans ordered their tickets
here, estimates indicate as many
as 50,000 rooters may be State par-
tisans. .
Rumors had scalpers getting $15
and $20 for the elusive ducats.
MSC Spirit High
Spirit on the State campus ran
high as 8,000 students turned out
for a massive pep rally Thursday
night.
Close to 1,000 students filled
Yost Field House here yesterday
for a pep rally. Cheering was spor-
adic and one student said, "If
someone would show real enthu-
siasm, these rallies would be a lot
better."
Authoro f "Victors," Fred Law-
ton, '11, gave an imitation of Mich-
igan's immortal Fielding Yost that
brought enthusiastic cheers and.
cries of "more, more, more."
Cries of "Roll-em-up" greeted Al
Wistert, captain of the 1949 team
and one of three Wistert brothers
who played football for Michigan,
when he spoke.
Steve Filipiak of radio station
WHRV emceed the rally.
Police Alerted
East Lansing and Ann Arbor po-I
lice were alerted when pre-game
exhuberance had carloads of

11

-Daily-John Hirtzel
LL IN YOST FIELD HOUSE
res for MSC;
,000 Students
"painters" descending on both
campuses.
Following the pep rally a surg-
ing crowd of 300 students snake-
danced their way up State Street,
gained entrance to a campus the-
atre, rocked several cars and then
dispersed.
The crowd formed in front of the
theaters but -the alerted manage-
ment barred their way. However,
nearly 100 wild-eyed students
gained entrance to one of them
when the early show let out,
climbed onto the stage and sang
"The Victors." Several ushers
were bruised in an attempt toustem
the tide.
Ideal Weather
Near-ideal football weather has
been forecast. Temperature around
game time should approach 50 de-
grees, the weatherman said, with
"increasing cloudiness but no pros-
pect of rain."
At half-time, brother will face
brother across the field-with ba-
tons.
Gordon Richard Pattton, '57, will
lead the Michigan Marching Band
while his brother, Archie Patton
Jr., twirls before the MSC band.
"St. Louis Blues"
In response to overwhelming de-
mand, pre-game festivities will
feature the Marching Band doing
its colorful dance routine "St. Lou-
is Blues," band director William B.
Revelli announced yesterday.
Half-time show will honor Bra-
zil with the band playing "Brazil"
while forming a coffee cup with
bubbling coffee. Marching down the
field as a train with moving
wheels, the band will play "Teko-
Teko," form a cable car and go
into "Rainy Night in Rio."
Block 'M' Performs
Block 'M' will accompany the
band, performing flash c a r d
stunts in imitation of band forma-
tions.
"The Story of Dixieland Jazz"
will be told by State's band under
the direction of Leonard Falcone.
It will be the first performance by
a visiting band this year in the
stadium.
After the game "The Baton
Twirler," written by Detroit band-
master Leonard B. Smith, will be
played by the Marching Band with
the accompaniment of Bill Mod-
lin, six-time National Baton Twirl-
ing Champion.
IRENT-A-CAR I

11

est living champions of human lib-
erty, and one of the greatest liv-
ing foes of Communist slavery."
Exp6sed Dangers
"McCarthy," he said, "brought
the country to its senses with his
campaign to expose the - dangers
which we faced. His reward for
that today is the offered motion of
censure."
Sen. Welker said the American
people "recognize foul play when
they see it, and they see it now in
this tawdry assault . .. what the
American people have been looking
at is dirty work."
McCarthy fans came by train,
bus and automobile for Thursday
night's demonstration, but first
they converged on Capitol Hill.

Some real estate men have no
policy on discrimination because
"we don't have many requests from
Negroes" or "we just don't happen
to have anything in areas that
might be rented to them. Our units
are rather expensive."
Realistic Realtor
Another dealer, who describes
himself as "kind of a realist," ex-
pressed his position. "We don't
rent to Negroes. It just isnt' done.
I might add that we don't rent to,
any families with more than two
children.
"We all wish we had Negro hous-
ing. We just don't have it."
Speaking of the general situa-
tion, he remarked "apartments are
a tough deal. They can't get
an apartment. They can get one
in a Negro section, but they're
overcharged. I can tell you frank-
ly, there's nothing good for the
Negro."
He declared himself in favor of
"gradual integration," but said "I
wouldn't want a Negro living
across the street from me, would
you? It would depreciate my
home's value. When it's going to
cost you a thousand dollars . . ."
a "Pur
DURING

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: THERE ARE
SUCH THINGS
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.-Congregational Church. Speaker:
Miss Donna Hoffman: INSIDE EUROPE
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday, 4:00 to 6:00--Open House after the
game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45-Worship services,
with the pastor preaching on "Redeeming the
Time."
Sunday at 6:00-Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper-Program. Talk by the pas-
or, "A Restless6Heart Finds Rest," on St.
Augustine, b. 1600 years ago on Nov. 13,
354 A.D.
Wednesday at 9:00 P.M.-Fellowship Hour.
Friday at 6:00--Married Couples Potluck Supper
Friday at 8:15-Gamma Delta Party at the Center
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lone Hall
10:00 A.M.-Young Friends
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship. Visitors Wel-
come.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
7:00 P.M.-Lutheran Student Assn. Meeting.
Discussion-"The Role of the Church in Rase
Discrimination."
Tuesday-
7:15-8:15 P.M.-"Studies in Biblical Faith," Dr.
George Mendenhall.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M., and 8 P.M.
Lectures on The Faith of the Church at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 6:30 P.M.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Devine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, Nov. 4, 7:30 P.M.-Ortho-
dox Student Guild
EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN
CHURCH
Broadway at Plymouth Rd.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship
7:30 P.M. Evening Service
R. L. Lewis, Minister, Phone NO 3-4061
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service: Sermon by Rev.
Press: "Gratitude and Joyous Living"
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild at the Bethlehem
Church

IN CONSTITUTION HALL:
McCarthy Fans Stage Washington Rally

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 A.M.-Bible Study
11:00 A.M.-Sunday morning service. Sermon:
"God's Building."
6:45 P.M.--Student Guild Meeting, "Toward
Campus Christian Life"
8:00 P.M.-Evening Vespers, "For Post College
Age"
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wankdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship: "What's Most
for my money?" Dr. Abbey, preaching.
9:30 and 10:15 A.M. Student Seminars; Topics:
"Major Methodist Beliefs" and "Great Ideas
of the Bible"
5:30 P.M.-Meet in Wesley Lounge to go to
Exchange Meeting with Canterbury Club.
Topic for discussion: "The similarities and
differences between Episcopal and Methodist
Beliefs."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917Washtenaw, Phone NO 2.0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10 A.M.-Adult Discussion Group. Mrs. Wilfred
Kincaid on "Our Program of Religious Edu-
cation"
11 A.M.-Service of Worship-Mr. Edmonds
preaching "Our Aspirations for Our Children"
5 P.M.-Unitarian YouthFellowship at 1111
White Street
7:15 P.M.-Transportation pick up
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group from Lane
Hall. Jim Clark on "Extra-Sensory Perception"
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Minister to Students: Rev. H. L Pickerill;
Assoc. Sue Gillespie.
Morning worship at 10:45 A.M. Subject of Dr.
Parr's sermon, "The Positives of Religion."
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M. Donna Hoffman will
speak on "Inside Europe," impressions of a
summer tour.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Corner Lawrence and Thayer
Phone NO 3-2139
Rev. Herbert Nation, Minister
Phone NO 2-5361
9:45 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship
7:00 P.M.-Young People's Meeting
7:45 P.M.-Evangelistic Service
Wednesoay, 7:45 P.M.-Prayer Meeting
A hearty welcome is extended to all students.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets,
Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-"Our Spiritual Progress"
6:00 P.M.-Student Guild
7:00 P.M.-"A Lesson in Humility"
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
We welcome you.

Heads A ssociualion
G. Donald Kennedy, a former
graduate in civil engineering from
the University, has recently been
elected president of a cement man-
ufacturers association.
Kennedy has had more than 24
years experience in structural, mu-
nicipal and highway engineering.

LICENSES
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and oil
and Insurance.
Phone
'NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor Sales
Inc.

r I

NNW

1!

THE ANN ARBOR BANK
offers you a plan to
BANK *BY MAIL
Be sure to inquire about this plan:
SAVE TIME and MONEY

A Y Yn' iy /
NIi i^i . >y .
.ry tY
a k ~
r /

SA

'chase From Purchase"
OUR PRE-CHRISTMAS CLEARANCE
TURDAY AND MONDAY ONLY

Fl~

I

Flash Bulbs
No. 25, Reg. 13c
9c ea.

Slide Files
All Metal, Reg. $2.95
$1.94

Slide Viewers
Reg. $1.00
59c

620 & 120 Film
Reg. $1.20
3 rolls 68c

Demonstrators -- Display Models

MOVIE CAMERAS
8mm, Reg. 49.50. .$39.95
SLIDE PROJECTORS
300 watt, blower cooled with
case. Reg. $49.50 . .$35.00
TRIPODS
vith Panhead. Reg.
$13.75............$9.95

PROJECTION SCREENS
all sizes and makes
$5.00 and up
ENLARGERS-4x5 Testrite
(less lens).......$30.00
Solor-Federal-Detur, etc.
CAMERAS

Gadget Bogs
All Types
from .$194

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister,
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday, November 14-
9:45-Guild studies Philippians and Colossians
11:00-Sermon: "Whatever Happens"

Bargain Table
Filters - Sunshades

FIRST LNIIRrH AR C'NRIST_ SEianficf

U

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