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November 12, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-12

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PAGE' TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12,1954

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. WflVFMRER 1~ 1!~Q

a ww - I a it 7 i;IAYA" AW Xr4t ao4o,

9

Cinema SL juild
"1 WAS A
MALE WAR BRIDE"
ANN SHERIDAN
CARY GRANT
Friday 7:00 and 9:00 P.M.

HAVING 'DEVILISH TIME':
Annual Smog Plagues Los Angeles

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

COLETTE'S

"-

GI

By ELISSA PANUSH
The "City of the Angels" is hav-
ing a devilish time.
The irritating combination of
smoke and fumes, from oil refin-
eries, 2 million incinerators and
1.5 million cars reaches its peak
in the Los Angeles area every fall.
Gaseous fumes are squeezed be-
tween San Gabriel mountains and
the sea, trapped by a layer of
warm air. Los Angeles is plagued
annually by its own unique brand
of smog.
Smog is only a combination of
smoke and fog. It is a dingy dis-
couraging weather condition which
occurs when fine solid particles
f matter provide nuclei for mois-
ture drops. Smog need not be a
blight but all Los Angeles smog
contains noxious gaseous irritants.
May Be Harmful
Smoke and fog are irritating
and oppressive in an uncombined
form but together they may be
harmful. In Donora, Pennsylvan-
ia, 20 people lost their lives in Oct.,
1948, when a sudden meteriolo-
gical situation exposed the town
to an unusually smoggy atmos-
phere.
A similar, lifetaking disaster
struck the Muese valley in Belgium
in December of 1930. These tra-
gedies have not as yet been dupli-
cated in Los Angeles.
A schoolchild was temporarily
blinded by smog and a husband
blamed his wifes attempted sui-
cide on it, but the majority of Los
Angeles residents only feel the dis-
comforts of continuous coughing
and crying.
Changed Smog Policy
City fathers have been forced
to change smog policy from words
to action.
At the University of Southern
California's school of medicine, a
controlled experiment is being con-
ducted to determine what the re-
lation of lung cancer to smog is.
2000 healthy mice have been plac-
ed in a giant converted icebox.

According to authorities these tie slowly began changing col
same impurities are present in air The transmutation stopped or
inhaled by population of any large when the tie had reached a sha
city. similar to ripe grapes.
The other 1000 have a private Startled, Sharpless turned it 1
suite in the converted deep freeze. er to the University's chemical d
They are being treated to "deli- partment. The department inforn
ciously uncontaminated mountain ed Sharpless that oxidizing su
air." After 26 months these mice stances in Calif6rnia's infamo
and their descendents will be ex- smog had caused the change.
amined a n d a n y malignant The only known cure for L
growths analyzed. In this manner Angeles' present smog problem
authorities hope to discover and a good stiff rain.

The mice are divided into two
groups. One colony of rodents, in
their private steel cell will be sub-
jected to air polluted with hydro-
carbons, oxides of nitrogen, and
ozone.
Present in Air

cure any harmful effects of smog.
The effects of smog are not all
tragic. At the University of South-
ern California, James Sharpless
appeared in class wearing a coral
colored necktie.
As class progressed, Sharpless'

or.
nly
de
iv-
de-
,m-
b-
ous
Gs
is

.U' Professors' Question
Einstein Vocation Views

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices shouldbe sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 45
Notices
Pan-Hel Ball Pictures will be on dis-
play in the League lobby till Fri., Nov.
12. Sign up early so you will receive
your pictures at the earliest possible
date.
Payments for board and room for the
second half of the fall semester are
to be made in all League Houses by
Mon., Nov. 15.
Tryouts for the Annual French Play
will be held Wed. and Thurs., Nov. 17
and 18, from 3:00 to 5:15 p.m. in Room
408, Romance Language Building. All
students with some knowledge of French
are eligible.

PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will interview at Engineering:
Mon., Nov. 15
Otis Elevator Company, Detroit, Mich.
-B.S. & M.S. in Civil, Elect., Ind., &
Mech. E. for Sales Engineering.
Cities Service, Research & Develop-
ment Company, Tulsa, Okla.-PhD in
Chem.E., Physics, Chem. & Math. Will
consider M.S. in Chem. E., for Re-
search & Development.
Esso Labs, Standard Oil Co. (N.J.),
Louisiana Div., Baton Rouge, La.-al
degree levels in Chem. E. for Research
and Development.
Cities Service Research and Develop-
ment Company, Tulsa, Okla.-all de-
gree levels of Chem. E. for Research
and Development.
Scott Paper Company, Chester, Pa.
-B.S. & M.S. degrees in Chem., E.
Mech., Ind., Mech., E.-Math., E.-Phys-
ics. Also PhD degrees in Mech. & E.-
Physics for Production, Design, Devel-
opment, Research, Purchasing, Indus-
trial E., Quality & Tech. Control.
Combustion Engineering, Inc., E. Chi-
cago, Ind.-B.S. degree in Mech. E. for
Product & Plant Engineering, Stand-
ards, and Manufacturing.
Aro, Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn.-B.S. &
M.S. degrees in Aero., Mech., & Elec. E.
for Engineering.
Tues., Nov. 16
Detroit Edison Company, Detroit,
Mich.-B.S. & M.S. degrees in Elec. &
Mech. E. for Electrical System Plan-
ning & Operations Engineer, Power

Plant Production Operational Engineer-
ing, Planning and Project Engineer and
Design.
Michigan Civil Service Commission,
Lansing, Mich.-B.S. & M.S. Civil, Ind.,
& Mech. E. plus allydegree levels of
Chem. E. for Highway Engineering &
other State Civil Service Positions.
U.S. Government, U.S. Navy, Phila.
delphia Naval Shipyard, Phila., Pa.-
B.S. & M.S. degrees in Elec. (& Elec-
tronics), Civil, Ceramic, Mech., Ind.
Welding, Naval Arch. & Marine, &
Structural E. for Design Engineering
and Research, Development and Test-
ing.
Solvay Process, Allied Chemical &
Dye Corp., Solvay Process Div., Syra-
cuse, N.Y.-all degree levels of Chem.
E. & Chem., also B.S. degrees in Mech.
E. for Production Supervision, Engi-
neering Design, Research, Technical
Service.
Tues. & Wed., Nov. 16 & 17
Glenn L. Martin Company, Baltimore
3, .Maryland-all degree levels of Aero.,
Civil, Elec., E. Mech., Mech., & E.-Phys-
ics, for Design Development (Research)
Analysis & Test Engineering.
Tues., Nov. 17
Alcoa, Aluminum Company of Ameri-
ca, Pittsburgh, Pa.-all degree levels of
Chem., Civil., Elec., E. Mech., Ind.,
Mech., & Met. E., plus Engrg.-Physics,
for Production, Development, Research,
and Sales.
Union Carbide & Carbon Corp., Car-
bide & Carbon Chemicals Co., Whit-
ing, Indiana-B.S. & M.S. degrees in
(Continued on Page 4)

19

i

(in French)
(i rnhDAN I ELE DELORME
FRANCK VILLARD
YVONN E DE BRAY
SATURDAY 7:00 and 9 P.M.
SUNDAY 8:00 P.M. ONLY

50C
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

By GAIL GOLDSTEIN
If he had it to do over again, "I
would not try to become a scien-
tist, scholar, or teacher," Albert
Einstein said in a letter published
in this week's issue of Reporter
magazine.
Einstein had been asked for his
comment on a recent Reporter ar-
ticle relating to the present situa-
tion of American scientists.
Another Occupation
"I would rather choose to be a
plumber or a peddler," he com-
mented, "hoping to find that mo-
dest degree of independence still
available under present circum-
stances."
The world-famed physicist has
expresed this attitude in bicterly
opposing congressional inquiries
into the political beliefs of scien-
tists and educators. He recently
urged "intellectuals" called before
Shop Teachers
Confer Today
Prof. Ralph C. Wenrich and
Prof. Robert Hutchcroft of the
School of Education's vocational
education department are attend-
ing the 41st annual meeting of the
Industrial Arts conference which
opens today in Chicago.
Sponsored by the Mississippi
Valley Industrial Arts Association,
the conference is held to discuss
problems in industrial education
and is composed of teacher-train-

congressional probers to refuse to
testify on their political leanings.
University scientists and educa-
tors seem to oppose Einstein's
opinions on this subject. Prof. Ed-
win N. Goddard, head of the geol-
ogy department commented, "I do
not feel that my freedom has been
curtailed. As a member of the Uni-
versity faculty, I naturally realize
that my responsibilities will cut
down on my available time for re-
search, but that is to be expected.
"No one should worry about in-
quiry into his political beliefs as
long as he has done nothing which
may question his loyalty," he said.
Removed from Practical Problems
"Dr. Einstein is an idealist rath-
er removed from some of our more
practical problems," said Prof. Er-
nest F. Barker head of the physics
department.
I would agree that scientists
have been subjected to more than
their share of criticism on this
problem, but activities they are en-
gaged in are above average in im-
portancetothis country's welfare.
"I certainly couldn't have enter-
ed any other profession that would
have made me happier," the phy-
sics professor noted.
Holding no sympathy for people
who feel hurt when they are called
before an investigating committee,
Prof. Adam A. Christman, of the
biological chemistry department,
also felt there would be no grati-
fication in any other profession
for him.
In reference to the scientist's
position today, Prof. Dugald E. S.
Brown, head of the zoology de-
partment, said "the American sci-
entist is in no different situation
today than he has always been. I
think he's holding his own."

MICHIGAN

FINAL WEEK NEW ARENA THEATRE
"ARMS AND THE MAN"
By G. B. Shaw
Thursday through Saturday Nights, 8:15 P.M.
Admission $1.65
Sunday Matinee, 3 P.M.-- (No Evening Performance Sunday)
High School Students 65c at Sunday Matinee

I

ers and supervisors. It ends
urday.

Sat-

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
327 S. 4th Ave., Masonic Temple

NOrmandy 2-5915

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'I

UNION
A
Z
C
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F
T
Featuring:
ANN ARBOR ALLEYCATS
and
ALEXANDER CAMPBELL'S
COMBO
in
UNION BALLROOM
TONIGHT
8:30 P.M.

E

y

STARTING TODAY
Doors Open 12:45
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05 P.M.

CinemaScope Prices
Matinees 65c
Evenings and Sunday 90c

WUERTH
NOW!
M-G-M's NEW PROIUCTION
FROM THE POPULAR
MAGAZINE NOVEL
GREER
{ ARSON
: ROBERT A
~ RYAN

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BAMRSUU.NAN
Also-
MR. FUN AT HIS
FUNNIEST!!
I PARAMOUNrTS
c h,
vrnuow0RA

After the Pep Rally

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a't

,E°
v..
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>. ,. .
t:; ;::;:;::>:::

COWYOUR BLESSiHOS ISTEAD OF SH4EEP"-""LOVE, YOU DIDN'T DO RohrHT
IRVING BERLIN'S
MOIIW4 /ICNIUU DN4i-1M f
s"~oP, T(W r AQ WV. ]BANTkTJ VAVE'.1

A Listening Treat ...
Nine thrilling selections from
just-released "New Orthophonic"
HIGH FIDELITY ALBUMS.
Overture to Gaite Parisienne, Fiedler, Boston Pops
Russian Easter Overture, Stokowski

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