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October 31, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-31

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE =

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE ~E13

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-Daily-Lynn Wallas
A LOT OF OFFICE WORK GOES INTO AN ELECTION
County Republicans Pledge
Most Efficiency, Least Cost

-Daily-Lynn Wallas
FAMILIARIZING THE PUBLIC WITH THE CANDIDATES

--Daily-Lynn Wallas
STUDENTS HELP REMIND PEOPLE TO VOTE

--Daily-Lynn Walla
MIMEOGRAPHING SAVES VALUABLE TIME

(Ed. Note: This statement was pre-
pared for the Dailyby Douglas K.
Reading, chairman of the Wash-
tenaw County Republican Commit-
tee.
All Republican county candidates
are pledged to a program of con-
tinued maximum efficiency in ev-
ery county office.
We are pledged to prompt dis-'
patch of the responsibilities of ev-
ery county office witha minimum
of cost to the taxpayers of Wash-
tenaw County. We further support
the sound principles established
and legislation supported by the
Republican administration in our,
state government.
Scoreboard
This is the scoreboard of our
great team:
1. Ended Korean fighting and
bloodshed.
2. Restored honesty, integrity
and efficiency to government-to
the relief of all Americans.
3. Achieved peacetime prosperi-
ty with '53 best and '54 second best
in history.
4. Cut Truman's spending plans

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$10 billion; reduced taxes nearly
$7% billion a year.
5. Halted inflation; stabilized the
dollar.
6. Reversed the 20-year trend
toward centralization of power in
Washington.
Highest Standards
7. Set highest security standards
for government jobs; removed 2,-
400 risks.
8. Extended and improved social
security and railroad retirement
benefits.
9. Promoted equality of treat-
ment; ended racial segregation in
many areas.
10. Strengthened U.S. and free
world defenses against Communist
aggression.
11. Ended price, wage and rent
controls.'
12. Started peacetime use of
atomic energy.
13. Established Department of
Health, Education and Welfare;
expanded hospital building and vo-
cational rehabilitation.
Record Aid
14. Voted record Federal aid for
highways.
15. Expanded housing aids to
help more families own better
homes.
16. Restored Tidelands to the
states.
17. Provided flexible farm price
support and surplus disposal pro-
grams.
18. Approved St. Lawrence Sea-
way after three decades of effort.
19. Provided improved postal
service.
20. Increased veteran's and civil
service employes' benefits.
According to The Gallup Poll, a
major factor in favor of the Demo-
crats at Tuesday's election is a
tremendous arithmetical advan-
tage in the Solid South.
Ending Today
B UR 4
LANCASTER
; n.or- byTechnicolor
JEAN PETERS
Also
"Long Wait"
FRIDAY
"VALLEY OF THE KINGS"
Robert Taylor
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Candidates:
First Ward,
Ann Arbor
Governor: Donald S! Leon-
ard (R); G. Mennen Williams
(D); E, Harold Munn Sr. (Pro-
hibition); Theos A. Grove (So-
cialist Labor Party) ; Frank
Lovell (Socialist Workers).
Lieutenant Governor: Clar-
ence Reid (R); Philip A. Hart
(D); Harold Dindahl (Prohi-
bition); James C. Horvath
(SLP).
Secretary of State: Owen J.
Cleary (R); James A. Hare
(D); Gladys T. Davis (Prohi-
bition); C h a r l e s Schwartz
(SLP).
Attorney General: Frank G.
Miller (R); Thomas M. Kav-
anaugh (D); Ralph W. Mun-
cy (SLP).
State Treaseurer: D. Hale
Brake (R); Sanford A. Brown
(D); William J. Persons (Pro-
hibition); W. Clifford Bentley
(SLP).
Auditor General: John B.
Martin (R); Victor Targon-
ski (D); Alvin Figg (Porhibi-
tion); John Zywicki (SLP).
U.S. Senator (full term):
Homer Ferguson (R); Patrick
V. McNamara (D); LeRoy M.
Lowell (Prohibition); James
Sim (SLP); Rita Shaw (SWP).
Representative in Congress,
(Second district): George Mea-
der (R); J. Henry Owens (DI);
Edmund T. Taylor (SLP) .
State Senator (thirty-third
district: Lewis G. Christman
(R); Lewis C. Reimann (D);
Marian Andrews (Prohibition).
Representative in State Leg-
islature (first district) George
Wahr Sallade (R); John Web-
er Carr, III (D).

City Voters To Consider

10 Local, Sty
Local voters will find four state-
wide proposals, one county propo-
sal and five annexations on the bal-
lot Tuesday.
First proposal up for considera-
tion is an amendment to prevent
disqualification of electors who
have moved within the state during
the 30 days preceding an election.
According to Ann Arbor League of
Women Voters, there appear to be
no outstanding reasons for oppo-
sition.
An amendment to the state sales
tax articles in the constitution,
known as the Conlin plan, is the
second proposal. It changes the al-
location of sales taxes collected,
allowing a half cent from each
three cents collected to be distrib-
uted on the basis of population to
cities, villages and townships.
$800,000,000 for Veterans
Authorization to borrow up to
$80,000,000 to pay bonuses for mili-
tary service during the Korean
War is the amendment which is
number three. Armed forces veter-
ans who served between World
War II and the Korean War along
with those who served after the
Korean War would not be eligible
for these bonuses.
If proposal number four is
passed, the Legislature will be em-
powered to authorize charitable
lotteries. This amendment to the
state constitution was initiated by
citizens who desired to legalize
non-profit charitable lotteries.
County proposal number one asks
for a transfer of $110,000 from the
county general fund to a special
fund to be used in constructing and
equipping a juvenile detention
home. Voting on this can be done
only by taxpayers.
During the past two years Wash-
tenaw county has not had a build-
ing which could be used for the de-
they had to be accommodated in
tention of juveniles. As a result,
other cities in the area, including
some more than 100 miles away.
Five Annexations
Five annexations to Ann Arbor

rte Proposals
are also up for the electorate's
decision. They are the Ann Arbor
Hills subdivisions on Washtenaw,
two properties on Maple near Hais-
ley School and a parcel of land lo-
cated between Maple and Stadium.
City Planning Commission has
recommended the Ann Arbor Hillls
annexation, but has not had suffi-
cient time to study the advisabili-
ty of the other annexations. They
have indicated that the other four,
however, are part of the natural
and orderly expansion of Ann Ar
bor.
1934:
State Voters
Defy Sweep
Michigan stood conspicuously
alone in the off-year election of 20
years ago when the New Deal
swept the nation.
For the first time in history, the
Democrats gained control of the
gubernatorial, senatorial and con-
gressional seats in 22 states.
With a hold-over of 43, the Dem-
ocrats now had two-thirds major-
ity in Congress for the first time
since pre-Civil War days.
However, Michigan withstood the
Democratic tidal wave. Sen. Ar-
thur H. Vandenberg defeated his
Democratic opponent,dFrank A.
Picard, by more than 50,000 votes.
Democratic incumbent Arthur J.
Lacy was defeated in the. guberna-
torial race by Frank D. Fitzger-
ald.
Republicans were elected to the
posts of secretary of state, lieu-
tenant governor and prosecuting
attorney.
In Washtenaw County, the com-
plete GOP slate was given a ma-
jority. Of the entire county, only
one township and the fourth and
fifth wards of Ann Arbor went
Democratic.

(Ed. Note: This statement was pre-
pared by the Daily for the Demo-
cratic County Committee.)
The Democratic Party in Wash-
tenaw County stands four-square
behind Governor Williams and his
program for building Michigan.
The plans for an improved high-
way system are ready now. If
Democrats are sent up to Lansing
they will see that work is begun
at once, so that when the new
Straits Bridge is opened, there will
be adequate highways.
Our present unemployment com-
pensation bills are inadequate, and
our provisions for workman's com-
pensation are equally so; the time
to improve them is now.
Support Williams
The three legislative candidates
strongly support the governor's
plans for a school construction
program to meet the needs of the
growing child population, and for
increased salaries foruteachers.
They have also come out in favor
STUDENT SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING MACHINES
Bought, Sold, RENTED and
Repaired
* * * !
Desks, Chairs, Steel Files
* * * *.
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State S. Since 1908
Phones: NO 8-7177 - NO 8-9610
Open Saturdays until 5 P.M.
except home games.

of the farm marketing progras as
presented by Williams.
The Washtenaw County candi-
dates stand for the F.E.P.C. to
provide equal job opportunities for
all citizens, and for the develop-
ment of an improved public health
program, especially in the field of
mental health.
No Burning Issues
For the most part there are no
burning issues on the County lev-
el that divide Democrats from Re-
publicans. The voters must make
their choice on the basis of per-
snality, experience and integrity.
Mr. Oltersdorf, the candidate for
Sheriff, however has a well worked
out program for that office that
the Washtenaw County Democrats
MICHI
SOUv
Musical
Miniature

consider important. Two of the
chief items on that program spe-
cially trained and. equipped for
the work, and the establishment of
a training school for new Deputy
Sheriffs.
One of the cardinal points on the
platform of the Washtenaw County
Democrats, not only -this year but
ever since housing problems be-
came acute at the end of the war,
has been the necessity for a hous-
ing program for this area. Wash-
tenaw County and the State of
Michigan must take action to pro-
vide for adequate low-cost hous-
ing. The Washtenaw County Dem-
ocrats believe that our many new
and growing families must have a
decent place to live.

'ENIRS
Footballs
Footballs

I

BUILDING PROGRAM:
County Democrats Promise
Williams All Out Support

i

Musical Cigarette Boxes
PENNANTS
BLANKETS
STICKERS
BANNERS
GLASSWARE
PLAYING CARDS
BIBS
T-Shirts, Jackets and Children's Sweaters
and Felt Animals

0

All imprinted with the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN INSIGNIA
SHOP and SAVE at
FOLLETTS
State St. at North University

Prosecuting Attorney:
mond F. Divine (R).

Ed-

Sheriff: Erwin L. Klaker
(R); Lawrence Oltersdorf (D).
County Clerk: Luella M.
Smith (R) ; Eleanore R.
R. Graves (D).
County Treasurer:"William
F. Verner (R); Robin J. Bras-
seur (D).

...

I

F

I

Register of Deeds:
Newkirk Hardy (R));
L. Schaules (D).

Patricia
William

-q I

Drain Commissioner: John
H. Flook (R); Harry E. Norton
(D).
Coroner (vote for two): Ed-
win C. Ganzhorn (R); Frank
W. Staffan (R); William H.
Dickson (D).
County Surveyor: Herbert S.
Hicks (M).

Restaurant and Pizzeria
PIZZA IS OUR SPECIALTY
1204 South University
10 30 A M. to 1I P.M. Closed Saturdays

S.-

I

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G r

I

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00

m

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)
Lewis G. Christman and Jos. E. Warner, Repub-
lican legislators, voted against inspection of
schools by state fire marshall and Department
of Health.
Are they in favor of fire traps and unsanitary
schools?
(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

III

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Whatever your party ..
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