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October 22, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRIDAX, OCTOBER 22,1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V A OMW. T4

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1954 A d~EI
TIlE MICHIGAN BATTY

AUE FI WVE

TA

U'

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
lithograph compositions of Mr. Moj-
' mir Frinta.. The Congregational-Dis-
ciples will be Guild host.
Hillel: Fri. Services 8:00 p.m. Every-
one is invited to attend the Open
House Saturday after the football
game.
First Baptist Church. Fri. Oct. 22,
8:00 p.m. The Guild will holm its week-
ly party in the Guild House.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild:
7:30 p.m., Weiner Roast, meet at the
Guild House.
The first meeting of the Acolytes,
philosophy club, for 1954-55, will be
held Fri., Oct. 22 at 8:00 p.m. In the
East Conference Room of the Rack-
ham Building. Mr. Rollin Workman
will speak on "The Categorical Im-
perative."

Coming Events
Hillel. Reservations for Sun. brunch
at 10:30 a.m.-Call Sissy Diamondstein
at 229 Prescott, East Quad. 60c for
members and 75c for non-members.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild:
Sat. After-Game Open House at the
Guild House.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild:
Sun., 6:00 p.m., supper at the Congre-
gational Church. Program at 7:00 p.m.,
speaker-Morse Saito: "Christian Faith
in Japan." (Reservations for the fel-
lowship supper by Fri. evening-Call
3-5838).
Business Administration alumni and
faculty coffee hour, Sat., Oct. 23, 9:30
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in 9th floor lounge,
Business Administration School.
SRA Homecoming Party. Square and
social dancing. Refreshments and other
entertainment. Everyone welcome. No
admission charge. Lane Hall, Sat., 8:00-
12:00 p.m.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Cider
and daughnuts after the game on Sat.
at Canterbury House. All students in-
vited.
Wesleyan Guild. Sat., Oct. 23, 5:30 p.m.
Annual Homecoming Alumni Barbecue.

AFTER THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN GAME
Visit the
v CXALU
For after the game entertainment
DANCING
Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday Night
Open 2 P.M. to 2 A.M.
Members of V.F.W. and their guests
Mary Lou, Your featured vocalist. Don Bailey, Your singing host

111

Class Opens
To Improve
Reading Skill
By JANE HOWARD
Most students who skim over
today's Daily are reading it at
about 300 words per minute.
This speed is usually adequate
for classes, assignments and out-
side reading, and will carry the
average student through his Uni-
versity career without much
trouble.
But for the some 700 students
on campus who annually decide
there's room for improvement in
their reading skills; the average
speed is 230 words per minute.
70 Percent Increase
If he enrolls in one of the ten
course series offered annually by
the University Reading Service,
however, a student with reading
difficulties can increase his speed
by about 70 percent-picking up a
variety of other valuable skills on
the side.
Registration for the next in the
series of seven-week courses be-
gins Tues., Oct. 26 in Rm. 548 of
the University Elementary School.
Office hours there are from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m., and registrations will be
accepted until Oct. 28.
There's no tuition or fee for the
reading courses, according to Don-
ald C. Smith, Director of the Read-
ing Service, and no credit given-
xcept the student's knowledge
that he is, after the course, much
better able to meet requirements
of his studies.
Most Come Voluntarily
Most enrollees in the courses are
what Smith terms "self-referrals"
-students aware of their own
needs to improve reading skills.
Some, however, are sent by Uni-
versity Counselling Service, dormi-
tory advisers, academic counselors
or the Health Service.
Courses begin with a diagnosis
of each student's skill deficiencies,
and continue with class and in-1
dividual work planned to develop
each student's limits of efficiency.
Later the classes include note-
taking sessions, work on methods
of study; preparation for and writ-
ing of both essay and objective-
type examinations, critical read-
ing, vocabulary development and
practice in improving specific
reading skills.,
Meeting Scheduled
For Vaccine Study'

ARMS AND THE MAN:
Drischell Comments on New Role

11

By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
A combination of bluntness and
a romanticism which "gets its
roots and sources from life" is the
most difficult part of playing the
role of Capt. Bluntschli in "Arms
and the Man," according to Ralph,
Drischell.
Drischell will portray the cap-
tain in the Dramatic Arts Cen-
ter's production of the Bernard
Shaw Comedy which opened yes-
terday.
The name itself is a pun on the
word blunt, the actor pointed out.
Bluntschli does not use the roman-
tic terminology of the other char-
acters, he explained, "because his
romanticism is the real McCoy, It
comes through his love of life."
Thinks She's Wonderful
"Although he doesn't get in-
volved in trivial matters he does
not scorn them," the young actor
pointed out. This seems to be the
key to his relationship with the
dreamy eyed heroine, Raina, whom
he thinks is "wonderful," Drischell
said.
Currently a member of the pro-
fessional company of the Drama-
tic Arts Center, the actor worked
with the World Stage, an arena
theater group in Detroit and the
Antioch Area Theater before his
arrival in Ann Arbor.
. A native of Long Island, N.Y.,
he felt that he did not want to
Local Station
To Broadcast'
Music Festival
Station WUOM-FM will present
its first "Contemporary Music Fes-
tival" with the entire evening
broadcast schedule from Oct. 25-
29 given over to live, taped and re-
corded performances, panel dis-
cussions and talks on contempo-
rary music.
A five-minute "Music Quiz" will
be a regular 7:30 p.m. feature, and{
another is a three-program series
on "Building Your Contemporary
Record Library."
The 9:30 p.m. talks will be given
by John A. Flower, instructor in
theory; Stanley Kimes, instructor
in voice, and Prof. Oliver Edel,
professor of violin-cello andj
chamber music.
Creative Arts Panel
A panel discussion Wednesday
on "The Creative Arts in Col-
lege" will include Charles E. Ode-
gaard, Dean of the literary col-E
lege; Prof. Ross Lee Finney of the
music school; P-rof. Allan Seager of
the English department and Prof.
Chet LaMore of the architecture
college.

FASHION REPORT:
COOL TODAY
C-R-A-Z-Y TOMORROW
~I~7~CAMPUS
BOW TIES a

-Daily-Dean Morton

RALPH DRISCHELL
... romantic comedian

Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
School of Graduate Studies has re-
turned from a lecture tour of Ger-
many where he found a "surpris-
ing amount of interest", in Amer-
ica's peacetime use of atomic
energy.
Director of the University's
Phoenix Project, Dean Sawyer,
who made the tour at the request
of the State Department, sought to
show the German people that the
United States is not only pre-
occupied with the production of
atomic weapons but with the peace-
time used of atomic energy as
well.
During his twenty-three day stay,

Sawyer Visits Germany

Dean Sawyer delivered lectures,
granted radio and television inter-
views, recorded speeches and was
interviewed by German reporters
at every stop.
Since he speaks German, the
Dean himself was eagerly question-
ed by the German, people. In a
nation whose coal supply is dwind-
ling, he found his listeners anx-
ious to know about plans to develop
nuclear power for industry.
Most popular questions dealt with
the possibility that the recent H-
bomb tests in the Pacific were the
cause of Germany's cold, wet
summer, a view encouraged by
the Russians.

V 91CIL W WJ

314 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor
Phone NO 2-3972--You must be 21
"Ann Arbor's Most Popular Club"

V

HEADQUARTERS for
ALL WOOL
BLANKETS
54x72 All Wool yellow felt Block M.......$10.00
54x72 All Wool yellow felt Block M.....0..$13.00
54x72 All Wool Yellow Chenille Block M. .. .$16.00
60x80 All Wool Chenille Block M..........$19.50
72x84 All Wool Extra Large Chenille Block M. .$22.50
60x80 Extra Soft Wool Yellow felt Mich. Seal.$25.00
60x80 Extra Soft Wool felt Mich. Seal..... ..$27.50

work in New York City after his
graduation from Carnegie Tech in
1953.
Instead, the former drama stu-
dent joined the Antioch group and
for two consecutive summers play-
ed a variety of roles in the Anti-
och Shakespearean Summer Fes-
tival.
During the two seven-play sea-
sons Drischell appeared in such
serious roles as Julius Brutus, one
of the two evil tribunes in "Cor-
iolanus," and Ulysses in "Troilus
and Cressida," In comedy, which
he says "is a little more my line,"
he played Smug, the joiner, in "A
Mid Summer's Night Dream."
As Capt. Bluntschli Drischell
says he uses a style of comedy "a
great deal different from the com-
Coller To Deliver
Churchill Lecture
Dr. Frederick A. Coller, chair-
man of the University's department
of surgery, will deliver the Church-
ill Lecture today beforetheExcel-
sior Surgical Club at .~Southern,
Pines, N. C.
Named for Dr. Edward D.
Churchill, surgical consultant in
the Mediterranean Theater during
World War II, the club is compos-
ed of surgeons who served in that
area during the war.

edy I had to use in "A Mid Sum-
mer's Night Dream."
What he does with a role de-
pends not only on the individual
play, he explained, but on all the
elements that go into a particular
production. Most important is "a
combjnation of my own feelings
and those of the director."
"If the play is going well, con-
tact between the audience and the
actor evolves." The stronger this
contact is, the more enjoyable it
is for the actor because he can
play to the audience and get them
to respond as he wants them to,"
he said.
Institute Holds
Festival Today
Sponsored by the English Lan-
guage Institute, a program of na-
tional songs and dances will be
performed at 8 p.m. today at
Rackham Assembly Hall by 23 in-
ternational educators. ,
The participants are all either
teachers of' English in foreign
countries, or from the Ministry of
Education of their countries. They
represent 17 nations from the Mid-
dle and Far East, Europe and
Latin America.

Here is the newest on.
campus fashion rage. Clever
eye-catching clip on school bows
specially made in your school colors
and letters to help you boost your,
alma mater.
They're ready nowi
4100

TICE & WREN
707 South University

.:.
.

A A -/ y. ll t0D£

pn
What- have VICEROYS got,
that other
filter tip cigarettes
haven'tgot?
9U

A meeting will be held at 4 p.m.
today in the office of Dr. Warren
Forsythe, Director of University
Health Service, for representatives
of groups which are interested in
participating in the flu vaccine
study.

t

WUS Bucket
Drive Sum Told
By yesterday evening the World
University Service bucket drive,
with stations all over campus, had
collected $566.63.
According to Edna Carlson,
'55Ed., chairman of the W.U.S.
committee, still further contribu-
tions will be made to the drive by
faculty members.

Today's Highlight
Highlight of today's program
will be a Composers' Forum, with
performances of new compositions
by University students, followed
by informal discussions of the
works.
Among the "live" programs fea-
tured will be a performance by the
Michigan Singers; a program of
contemporary music for the flute
and piano; a student concert of
viola and piano; a recital by Miss
Rhea Kish, Ann Arbor pianist,
and a program of songs by Prof.
Kimes.

HARBERT'S MARKET
1217 Prospect - North of Wells
SUNDAY MORNING SPECIAL
Bagels, onion rolls, bread, sweet rolls-from
Epstein Bakery
KOSHER salami, lox, herring

Ulricn 's
ANN ARBOR'S BUSY BOOKSTORE

Special Services for
Fraternities, Sororities, and Dorms
Phone NO 2-9844

3

m

COATS

* WOOLENS

* SWEATERS

C
A
s
H
M
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R
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s
B.
E
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V
D
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Sto-SALE!
AT
BRIGHTON, MICH.
LADIES' IMPORTED
CASHMERE SWEATERS
'The finest made in Scotland"
Short Sleeve Pullover - $22.50 Value.
SALE PRICE $16.95
LONG SLEEVE CARDIGANS
$29.95 and $35.00 Values
SALE $22.50
You will know the make.
Men's Imported
LAMBS WOOL SWEATERS
"Made in England"
Sleeveless Pullovers Regular $12.95 Value
SALE PRICE $8.95
Long Sleeve PULLOVERS
Regular $16.95 Value
SALE PRICE $9.95
Sizes 38 to 46. Colors Oxford, Yellow, Mist Blue, Black
Large Selection
MEN'S SHIRTS
Sizes 14 - 14/2 - 15 - 151/2
Made by Hathaway $5.95 - $7.50 Values
SALE PRICE $2.R9

"

i1

TONIGHT AND TOMORROW 8:30 P.M.
(Good Seats Available for Saturday Night) Prices: $2.50 - $1.75 - $1.00
In Person!

D
R
E
E
S

PAUL DOUGLAS

WENDELL COREY

STEVE BRODIE

The Critics Say:
Audiences Say:

"DON'T MISS IT"

"A Stage Sensation" -Life

"A Sure-fire Thriller"
-Chicago Sun-Times

H
0
E
R
Y

"A Whale of a Show"
-Chicago Tribune

"A Dramatic'

Triumph"
-N.Y. Times

"Truly Great Presentation"
-Philadelphia Gazette

"Gripping As A Typhoon"
-Manhattan Mercury

WORLD'S LARGEST-SELLING
FILTER TIP CIGARETTE

I

"Cheers!-a Walloping Per-
formance" -San Fran-
cisco Call Bulletin

"A Giant of a Drama"
-San Francisco Chronicle

*
f 4
KIno"-1 TP

.

611

III

11

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