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October 21, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TMJRSDAY, OCTOBER 21,1951

sHURSAYa . OCTORFR iV 1. 1!UJ

Pi

'ublish Book
In General's

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

,
C ^'

i

mpaigns

By MERLE MAYERSTEIN
Edited by Prof. William B. Will-
ox of the history department, a
manuscript account of British
eneral Sir Henry Clinton's cam-
>aigns in the American Revolu-
ion was published yesterday in
look form.
Prof. Wilcox did the research
or the book, "The American Re-
>ellion," in the William L. Cle-
nents Library from original pa-
ers.
Written by Sir Clinton after
he war, the narrative was vir-
ually completed at the time of
uis death in 1795. Along with a
election of his papers, it was
acquired by the late Regent Wil-
iam L. Clements and is now on
lisplay in the library along with
he book.
Compared Manuscripts
"The editing, Prof. Wilcox said,
'was largely a matter of compar-
rg the manuscript, written years
ifter the war, with Sir Henry's
apers written at the time of the
vents that he describes to see
zow much his narrative was col-
red by hindsight."
Sir Clinton was commander-in-
hief of the British forces during
he Revolution. He served in this
apacity from the spring of 1778
intil the spring of 1782--from the
3attle of Bunker Hill to almost
he end of the Revolution.
Prof. Wilcox, whose specialty is
7nglish and European history, has
een working with original man-
iscripts in Clements Library since
ie came to the University in 1941.
le received his bachelors degree
rom Cornell in 1928 and his doc-
orate from Yale in 1936.
Other Publications
During the time he was editing
The American Rebellion," he
irote various articles and anothr
r book, "Star of Empire," a gen-
ral history of modern Britain.
Engineers Inspect
Nine members of the College of
ngineering are attending a con-
erence on aircraft propulsion be-
ng held at the Lewis Flight Pro-
ulsion Laboratory in Cleveland
his week.
The group will inspect rocket
ropulsion laboratories.
r~17T--.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be.
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 26
Notices
Reading Improvement Service will
register students for its second series
of seven-week classes on Tues. through
Fri., Oct. 26-29 in 524 University Ele-
mentary School, 8:00-5:00. Allow one-
half hour for registering.
Submitters will please pick up poetry
manuscripts at Generation office.
The Ford Foundation Fellowship Pro-
gram is now open to students who wish
to study the cultures, histories, and
current problems of Africa, Asia and
the Near East, and the Soviet and East
European areas. The Fellowships are
for postgraduate study or research, ei-
ther in the United States or abroad.
Foreign Study and Research Fellow-
ships are available to United States
citizens and to aliens permanently re-
siding here who can give substantial
evidence of their intention to become
citizens. Awards will be available to
college seniors who will complete their
undergraduate studies during the aca-
demic year 1954-55. Previous study of
the area is not required in order to
qualify. Pre-doctoral and Postdoctoral
awards are also offered. In some cases
awards are offered to persons of prom-
ise or demonstrated ability in their
field or profession whether or not they
have previously specialized in the indi-
cated areas. Further information may
be obtained from the Graduate School,
or by writing to the Ford Foundation,
477 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y.
The following student sponsored so-
cial events are approved for the com-
ing week-end. Social chairmen are re-
mindedthat requests for approval for
social events are due in the Office of
Student Affairs not later than 12:00
noon on the Mon. prior to the event;
Oct. 21-Delta Sigma Delta (10)

Junior Management Assistant exam-
ination is announced by U.SI Civil
Service Commission, for men and wom-
en with background in public or busi-
ness administration or social sciences.
This examination is to recruit people
trained in management, social sciences,
or public affairs for careers leading to
high-level administrative positions in
Federal Government. Open to seniors
and graduate students who will have
completed BA or MA (or equivalent)
by June 30, 1955. Applications must be
filed by Nov. 30, and examinations will
be given in Ann Arbor and other lo-
cations on Jan. 8, 1955. This examina-
tion is given only once each year, so
you must apply NOW. Applications
and complete announcements are avail-
able at the Bureau of Appointments.
For further information on the three
notices above or on other job opportu-
nities, contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., ext. 371.
Employment Registration-The annu-
al placement meeting of the Bureau of
Appointments will be held at 3:00 p.m.
on Mon., Oct. 25, in Auditorium A of
Angell Hall. All seniors and graduate
students who are interested in register-
ing with the Bureau for employment
either after graduation, after military
service, or for future promotions in the
fields of education, business, industry,
government, or in the technical fields
are invited to attend. Registration ma-
terial will be given out at the meeting.
Attention All Students: There is an
Anti-Discrimination Board set up to
work actively for the removal of dis-
crimination in the general area of
serving and hiring of students in the
Ann Arbor business community. The
Board is interested inlearning of any
cases of possibly discriminatory prac-
tices which any individual or organi-
zation knows of, in order that the
members (5 students appointed by
S.L. 2 business men, 1 representative
of the Ann Arbor Civic Forum and I
member of the University Administra-
tion) may investigate all the facts.
Please give information or suggestions
to any student member-Leah Marks
(3-2804), Roger Wilkens (24591), Paul
Dormant (2-3219), Edward Reifel -(2-
4283) or Diana Hewitt (2-322) Ch.
Lectures
The Rackham Arthritis Unit and the
Department of Biological Chemistry an-
nounce a Lecture by Dr. Luis F. Leloir
of Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquim-
icans Fundacion Camomar. "The Role
of Uridine Nucleotides in Metabolisim."
4:00 p.m. Fri., Oct. 22. Room 1300 Chem-
istry Building
Academic Notices
M.A. Language Examination in His-
tory. Fri., Oct. 22, 4:15-5:15 p.m. 429
Mason Hall. Sign list in History Office.
Can bring a dictionary.
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts: The freshman five-
week progress reports will be due Fri.,
Oct. 22, in the Faculty Counselors Of-
fice for Freshmen and Sophomores,
1210 Angell Hal.
Doctoral Examination for James Ev-
erett Dyson, Jr., Bacteriology; thesis:
"A Study of Yeast Phase Antigens in
the Delayed Skin Reactions of Experi-
mental Histoplasmosis and Blastomy-
cosis," Thurs., Oct. 21, 3542 East Med-
ical Building, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
E. E. Evans.
401 Interdisciplinary Seminar in Ap-
plication of Mathematics to Social Sci-
ence will meet on Thurs., Oct. 21, room
3401 Mason Hall from 4:00-5:30 p.m.
D. B. Suits will speak on "Empirical
Analysis of a Dynamic Market."
Seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Oct. 21, at 4:00 p.m. in
Rm. 247 West Engineering. Speaker:
Dr. J. H. Giese, visiting lecturer, will
continue. Topic: "Canonical Equations
for Non-Linearized Irrotational Conical
Flow."
College of Architecture and Design
freshman five week grade reports are
due Wed., Oct. 27. Please send them
to 207 Architecture Building.

Thurs., Oct. 21, at 4:00 p.m., in Room
3201 Angell Hall. Mr. D. E.'Lamphier
will conclude his discussion of Chap-
ter III of Cochran's "Sampling Tech-
niques," and Mr. W. J. Wrobleski will
discuss Chapter IV.
Doctoral Examination for Harold Her-
bert Benjamin, Education; thesiis:
"The Role of the Hypothesis in Select-
ed Histories of American Education,
1912-1951," Fri., Oct. 22, 4024 University
High School, at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
Claude Eggertsen.
Doctoral Examination for Robert
George Craig, Chemistry; thesis: "En-
ergy of Immersion of Graphite Pow-
ders with Different Liquids: Free Sur-
face Energy Changes on Solids Deter-
mined by an Absorption Method," Fri.,
Oct. 22, 1565 Chemistry Bldg., at 2:00
p.m. Chairman, F. E. Bartell.
Doctoral Examination for Zelia Ste-
phens Evans, Education; thesis: "A
Study of Difficulties Encountered by
Selected Student Teachers and Begin-
ning Teachers of the Elementary Di-
vision of Alabama State College with
Implications for the Teacher-Education
Program," Frii., Oct. 22, West Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 8:45 a.m.
Chairman, G. M. Wingo.
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., Oct.
22, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Dr. Dean
B. McLaughlin will speak on "A New
Theory of the Martian Surface."
Law School Admission Test: Applica-
tion blanks for the Nov. 13 adminis-
tration of the Law School Admission
Test are now available at 110Rackham
Building. Application blanks are due
in Priinceton, N.J. not later than Nov.
3.
Logic Seminar-Fri., Oct. 22 at 4:00
p.m. in 443 Mason Hall. J. W. Addison
willspeak on "Measuring Non-effect-
iveness."
Concerts
Carillon Recital: Percival Price, Uni-
versity Carillonneur, will be heard in
another of his current series of pro-
grams at 7:15 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 21.
The program will include Presto from
the "Glockenspiel" Toccata, Prelude 12
fromdThe Well-Tempered Clavier, Vol.
2, and the Finale from the St. Matthew
Passion, by Bach; Prelude for Carillon
by W. W. Starmer; and a group of se-
lections from operas by -Purcell, Ra-
meau, von Gluck, von Weber, Verdi
and Strauss,
Faculty Recital: Stanley Kims, bass,
will be heard at 8:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct.
21, in Lydia Mendelssohn Theater. An
Instructor in Voice in the School of
Music, Mr. Kimes has planned a pro-
gram of works by Purcell, Falconieri,
Schumann, Gomes, Chausson, Hahn,
Poulenc, Vaughan Williams, Howard
Swanson, Dello Jobo, Dougherty, and
Michael Head. He will be accompanied
by Charles Fisher, Instructor in Piano.
The program will be open to the public
without charge.
Events Today
International Center Tea. Thurs., Oct.
21, 4:30-6:00 p.m., Rackham Building.
Freshman Discussion Group. Topic:
"Immortality-concern for the present
or a future life?" All freshmen wel-
come. Lane Hall Library, Thurs., 7:15
p.m.
Lane Hall Lecture: Elfan Rees, Advi-
sor, on Refugee Affairs to the World
Council of Churches and Secretary of
the Commission of the Churches on In-
ternational Affairs, will speak on "The
United Nations and the World Council
of Churches." Auditorium 'A', Angell,
8:00 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 21. Reception at
Lane Hall following lecture.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-
dent Breakfast at Canterbury House, on
Thurs., Oct. 21, after the 7:00 a.m. Holy
Communion.
La P'tite Causette will meet Thurs.
from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in the wing of
the Michigan Union cafeteria. Everyone
is welcome to join us in informal
French conversation.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 323
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a fine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Women's white gold Bulova
watch, in vicinity of League, Thurs-
day night. Reward. Call NO 2-3159.
)22A
LOST--Gold women's Clinton watch.
Call NO 2-2547. )23A
LOST-KEY CASE. Small badge on out-
side, marked Williamson Diamonds,
Tanganyika. Phone NO 8-6943. )21A
FOR SALE
FALL CLEARANCE
SALE
USED CAMERAS
Voightlander Vitessa-F 2.0 Ultron
lens, 1-1/500th Sec. Shutter, full
M/X Synch, Case, Filters. LIKE
NEW, $110.00.
Exa 35mm Single Lens Reflex-F 2.8
lens, case. LIKE NEW, $60.00.
Argus C-2-F 3.5 lens, $15.00.
Argus C-4-1952 Model with 1/200th
shutter, $65.00.
Graflex Series B--4x5 with 6%" F 4.5
Kodak Anastigmat, $45.00.
Graflex-Latest model Super D 4x5
with automatic diaphragm. 190mm
F 5.6 Ektar, Pack Adapter,, Roll
Film Adapter. LIKE NEW, $175.00.
Voightlander Bessa-F 4.5 Heliar
lens, 1-1/400th Sec., with case,
$49.50.
9xl2cm Cut Film Camera with F 4.5
Schneider Xenar. Ideal for Por-
trait or copy work. $25.00.
Uniflex-Like new with case and
flash, $19.50.
Keystone A-7-16mm roll load with
F 2.7 lens $45.00.
Kodak Reflex-F 3.5 lens, with case
$69.00.
Flexaret-Twin Lens Reflex with
F 3.5 lens, 1-1/200th Sec., Crank
Film advance, Case, $55.00.
Ansco Speedex-F 4.5 lens, % to
1/250th Sec. $19.50.
Zeiss Nettar-2%x3% Folding cam-
era with F 3.5 lens, 1-1/400th Sec.
Shutter, Case, $29.50.
"Purchase from Purchase"
a
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)94B
CLARINET-good condition. Best of-
fer. Call NO 3-41-45, Room J31. )97B
SETCHELL-CARLSON Radio AM-FM
table model, original cost $100, yours
for $50. NO 8-9085, Ask for Wally. )96B
VM TRIOMATIC 3 speed turntable, var-
iable reluctance, G.E. Cartridge with
diamond stylus. Call NO 2-2834 at
6 p.m. )95B
HIGHWAY ROBBERY! 1947 Olds, Radio
and heater, perfect condition. $175.00.
NO 3-3500. )92B
APARTMENT-SIZED WASHER, new,
reasonable. Call NO 2-9903 after 5. )93B

FOR SALE
The Best for Less
1950 PLYMOUTH CONVE1TIBLE
with radio and heater. A
real good buy, $545.
1947 PLYMOUTH CONVERTIBLE
radio and heater, one year old
top, $195.
1950 FORD CUSTOM 6, two door
radio, heater and over-drive.
$495.
1948 FORD STATION WAGON,
four door, excellent condition,
$345.
1948 KAISER four door, won-
derful transportation. $145.
1942 CHEVROLET two door, $65.
1946 FORD CLUB COUPE, V-8
engine, good tires, good body.
$245.
1936 FORD two door, runs good.
$65,
Two used car lots: 503 E. Huron,
NO 2-3261; East Ann Arbor, cor-
ner of Packard and Platt, NO
2-0171. Both lots open evenings
till 9:00.
Herb Estes, Inc.
)89B
ATTENTION Glee Club members, size
40 tails, good shape, $30, Phone NO
2-9016. )77B
ZEISS-CONTESSA CAMERA. Almost
new, reasonably priced. Call NO
2-8205. )90B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B
1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runsperfect, good top. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )4B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )69B
1949 STUDEBAKER, 4 door, maroon,
radio, heater, over-drive, real clean
car. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )65B
1949 FORD Custom Made radio, heater,
good rubber, real clean. See Smitty,
the big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )81B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B

FOR SALE
1932 FORD MODEL B., 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 R. Washington. )26B
FOR RENT
FURNISHED 3 rooms and bath. Private
entrance, South Division. Phone aft-
er 5:30. NO 8-6631. )10C
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM for SEVERAL BOARDERS. Con-
tact House Manager at NO 2-8312. )6E
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
PERSONAL
STUDENT WIVES-of course, you're
entitled to special rates to New York-
er, Time, Life, Ladies Home Jr., etc.
Student Periodical, NO 2-3061. )23F

HELP WANTED
WANTED: Students interested in form-
ing Marionette Theater group. De-
signs, construction, lighting, acting,
playwriting, etc. NO 3-3854 even-
ings. )12H
STUDENTS WIVES wanted for part
time work either mornings or after-
noons. Apply in person, Goldman
Brothers Cleaners, 214 S. State St. )7H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
ialize in winter cottons and blouses,
wool soxswashed also. 81
RADIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone' NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
HELP WANTED: WOMEN
MAKE EXTRA MONEY. Address, Mail
postcards spare time every week.
BICO, 143 Belmont, Belmont, Mass.

4

)1P
I B

FOUR ACADEMY AWARD WINNERS
BRING YOU THE YEAR'S MOST
PROVOCATIVE PICTURE!
HUMPIREY BOGART
AUDREY HEPBURN
WILIAM HOLDEN
~5iin
Produced and Directed by
A ILLYwd WILDER
Academy Award producer of fLoe ot Weekend." "Stalag 17"
With
WALTER HAMPDEN."JOHN WILLIAMS-"MARTHA HYER-'JOAN VOHS
Written forthe Screen by BILLY WILDER.SAMUELTAYLOR and ERNEST LEHMAN
tr,, the payby SAMUEL TAYLOR . A PARAMOUNTrPICTURE

Oct.

22---
Phi Delta Phi (12)
Delta Theta Phi (12)

1 4

ENDING TONIGHT

Oct. 23-
Alpha Alpha Phi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Alpha Kappa Psi
Alpha Rho Chi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chicago
Chi Phi
Chi Psi
Delta Kappa Epsilon
Delta Sigma Delta
Delta Tau Delta
Delta Theta Phi
Delta Upsilon
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Lloyd (aft) r
Nu Sigma Nu
Phi Alpha Delta
Phi Alpha Kappa
Phi Chi
Phi Delta Epsilon
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Sigma
Phi Rho Sigma
Phi Sigma Delta
Pi Lambda Phi
Psi Omega
Psi Upsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Mu
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Tau Epsilon Pho
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Theta Chi
Theta Xi
Triangle
Wenley House
Zeta Psi
Oct. 24-
Delta Theta Phi
Phi Delta Phi
Lloyd
Social Chairmen: The Committee on
Student Affairs has authorized a 1:00
a.m. closing hour for dances held on
Oct. 30. This was granted because of
the Michigan Union's 50th Anniversary
dance. House dances may be extended
until 1:00 a.m. provided they are so
registered.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
The Australian National University,
Research School of Social Sciences,
Canberra, Australia, is 11oking ' for a
Research Fellow in the Dept. of History.
Junior Agricultural Assistant exami-
nation is announced by the U.S. Civil
Service Commission to fill positions in
the Dept. of Agriculture and in the
Dept. of Interior in Washington, D.C.,
and throughout the United States. Ap-
plication may be made for positions in
the following optional fields: Bacteriol-
ogy, Botany, Entomology, Fishery Biolo-
gy, Forestry, Plant Pathology, Soil Sci-
ence, Statistics, Horticulture, Wildlife
iBology, Zoology, and various fields of
Agriculture. The examination is open to
graduates with Bachelor's degrees in
one of these fields or to students who
expect to complete their degrees by
June 30, 1955. The closing date for fil-
ing applications is Nov. 9. Examination
will probably be given in Ann Arbor.
Applications and additional information
are available at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.

Coming
Saturday

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Starting
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Phone reservations-
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