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October 19, 1954 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TUESD~AY, uOCTOBER 01, 1954

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'AUL GREGORY SAYS:
Good Productions Find Lost Audience

Playwright Rice To Lecture on Censureship

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(Ed. Note: This article was written
for The Daily by Paul Gregory, pro-
lucor of "The Caine Mutiny Court-
Martial" which will be presented at
:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at
ill Auditorium. The local presen-
ation will star Paul Douglas, Wen-
dell Corey, and Steve Brody.)
By PAUL GREGORY
It seems I had always heard
bout the so-called lost audience
>r the legitimate theater.
Yet, after being associated with
age presentations for a brief per-
d, I discovered-and hardly to
ly amazement-that the audience
ad actually been there from the
eginning. Good productions, it
ems, were what had been miss-

- i

I have a very strong conviction
at Americans will gladly pay for
e best things in the theater if
ly the purveyors of entertain-
ent will given them the chance.
It was under the motivation of
at conviction that I went out on
e enp of a slender limb, as many
lieved, by sending the First Dra-,
a Quartette out on the road in
on Juan In Hell" in Feb. 1951.
A Long Chance
Most persons who are supposed
know about these things were
re I was taking a very long
ance. There was, they reminded
e, no real audience for such arty
aff. I never agreed with them for
ninute.
The formula was, and is, simple.
classic of literature, "Don Juan
Hell" by George Bernard Shaw,
esented with consumate skill by
ir great personalities-Charles
yer, Charles Laughton, Sir Ced-
Hardwicke, and Agnes Moore-
ad.
Audiences did the rest - they
rifounded the "experts" by pour-
i more than a million dollars
rough box office windows around
e country.
'Overwhelming Appreciation'
I think sometimes that they
re more than happy to pay that

ed classics, I considered this huge-
ly successful novel a great work of
literature - its conversion into
stage form would have to be treat-
ed with respect. And similar to
works of art, our policy would be
not to interfere with its drama-
tization. The public, already so
familiar with the book, would have
been resentfully critical of any
other method.
I don't.believe in trying to im-
prove on the language of the au-
thor-there should be no tamper-
ing in the matter of characteriza-
tion or expression. This is even
true when it becomes necessary to
edit and condense in order to
bring a performance within the
time scope of an evening at, the
theatre.
Hundreds of Letters
Since I started producing plays
a few short years ago, I have en-
joyed reading hundreds upon
hundreds of unsolicited letters
from most sincere appreciation for
some of the shows we have sent
their way.
These communications, coming
from persons in so many divergent
walks of life, seemed ample evi-
dence to me-if evidence was ever
needed-that the audience for
good stage offerings has never left
us for a moment. Actually, I think
it's something in the reverse. Any
producer with a first-rate attrac-
tion doesn't have to look for his
audience, they'll come to him.

(uonJJttLuea t rUL11rage .1)
their neighborhood theater. When
your play is under the control of
an advertising agency, the policy
is set by people who usually know
nothing about theater. They're only
interested in making people watch
commercials," Rice said.
Rice plans to spend the next
eight weeks on campus. He will
be talking to small groups of stu-

dents interested in theater. "I may
also do seminars with some of the
students," he said.
While on campus, Rice will cast
and 'direct the speech department's
production of his play, "Dream
Girl..' He said the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn theater was "awfully good.,
The staff seems very well quali-
fied," he added.

r

Rice said he felt would-be actors
should begin their training early.
"I don't mean as children neces-
sarily. But at least during their
teens. The best place to get train-
ing is in'the theater itself."
Rice will hold a reception for
those who wish to speak with him
in the Rackham. Assembly room
immediately after the lecture.

TI

.3~ao~c~J U'L~

PAUL GREGORY
... Play producer

kind of money if only in appre-
ciation to those of us who were
considerate enough to pay tribute
to their intelligence. Because I
feel very strongly that there is a
;reat misconception as to what
constitutes the mentality of the
average American audience. They
really have an overwhelming ap-
preciation for the intelligent pro-
duction of thoughtful entertain-
ment.
The same reaction greeted "John
Brown's Body," the Stephen Vin-
cent Benet classic, which capti-
vated ticket-buyers both in small
towns and big cities, and again
proved that audiences are pretty
much alike everywhere in their
thirst for worthwhile stage fare.
When I read "The Caine Mu-
tiny," I had an irresistable im-
pulse to talk with its author, Her-
man Wouk. A stage dramatization
seemed so logical, so perfect, so
exciting, that I could almost see
the performers in their roles.
Like some of the most respect-

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Perfect for thrifty
COEDS or CAREERIST'S

--Daily-Dean Morton
NANCY ALLEN, '56ED., AND CHARLES STICKLES, '56E,
PREPARE FOR TECHNIC SALES.
Technic To Go on Sale Today;
Will Feature Several Changes

On sale today in the Engineer-
ing Arch is the "Michigan Tech-
nic," magazine by and for engi-
neering students.
As the only student publication
not housed in the Student Publi-

TODAY'S BRIDGE HAND:
Gamble for Extra Trick
May Jeopardize Contract

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Charles Munch Personification
)f Alsatian Province Culture

By DAVID KAPLAN
Charles Munch, conducting the
oston Symphony here tomorrow,
the personification of the double
ilture of the province of Alsace.
His father was a staunch Alsa-
an with a name derived from
he German, meaning "monk." His
zother was of pure French blood,
he daughter of a Protestant min-
ter in Paris.
Munch's early musical training
ame from his father who was an
ganist, string player and leader
' the St. Guillume choir in the
trasbourg Cathedral as well as
eing Munch's first violin teacher.
At the age of 21, Munch con-
nplated a medical career and
ent to Paris to study. But soon he
as devoting all his time to his
olin, studying under Lucien Ca-
et.
Concertmaster in Strasbourg
After serving in the first World
Jar, he became the concertmaster
the Strasbourg Orchestra. He
ter joined the Gewandhausr Or-
aestra of Leipzig and in 1937 be-

During his stay in Paris, Munch
also was on the podium of the
Lamoureux and the French Na-
tional Orchestras and founded the
Paris Philharmonic.
When the second World War
broke out, Munch held his post as
conductor in the Conservatory,
while secretly contributing to the
underground resistance. He holds
the Legion of Honor badge.
Guest Conductor
His first appearance in this
country was as .guest conductor of
the Boston Symphony on Dec. 27,
1946. Three years later, he succeed-
came conductor of the Paris Con-
servatory Orchestra.
ed Serge Koussevitzky as regular
conductor of the Boston Orchestra.
Wednesday's program here will
consist of Bach's "Suite for Or-
chestra, No. 4," Dvorak's "Sym-
phony No. 5" and excerpts from
Berlioz's "Romeo and Juliet."
Tickets prized at $3.50, $3, $2.50,
$2 and $1.50 are still available at
the office of the University Musi-
cal Society in Burton Tower.

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By BOBB HARDIES
With some partners it
gerous as well as wrong t
for an extra trick when th

ing jeopardizes the contract.
Our declarer, south, recently out
of the hospital for taking an un-
necessary finesse lost no time in
capturing the first trick with
dummy's ace-but this seemingly
correct play met with a cruel fate
for east casually trumped the ace
with the air of a man who knew
what was going to happen all the
time.
East gave our declarer another
problem by returning a diamond
at trick two.
Wrong Guess
Partially flustered by the turn
of events South decided that since
he would probably lose three club
tricks if he played the suit him-
self played low feeling that the
only plausible hope was that East
had led away from the Q of dia-
monds.
He subsequently woke up in the
3

hospital again having lost two
clubs in addition to the spade and
diamond he had already lost.
To make matters worse his
nurse, a confirmed Canasta player,
had no difficulty in finding what
the trouble was even after the un-
fortunate decision to play the Ace
of spades at trick one-unless East
has the King of spades doubleton
we can find very little reason for
the play except the fact that
South had just recovered from a
similar situation in which his fail-
ure to play the Ace cost him a
contract.
Hobson's Choice
Said the nurse, "Unless the dia-
monds are divided eight and zero,
ten tricks are made simply by tak-
ing the Ace of diamonds at trick
two, extracting trump in two
rounds, playing the King and
trumping a small diamond, and
graciously leading a small spade
from the dummy."
Despite his illness the crest-
fallen victim could see that West
was faced with Hobson's choice.
If he returned a spade the
Queen of spades would make, un-
less the King were led in which
case the Queen would be available
for a discard, a diamond return
would provide declarer with a
sluff and a ruff and his contract,
and a club return by West would
produce a club trick for South.
Before dozing off to sleep one
could berely hear South mumbling
a defense of his play of the Ace
of spades. "If I had taken the
spade finesse no doubt East would
have taken the King and returned
his doubleton club and got the
fourth trick via a ruff and I'd be
here just the same!"

cations Building, it has the dis-
tinction, Editor-in-chief Charles
Stickles, '56E, said, of being re-
garded by the Office of Student
Affairs as a part of the engi-
neering college.
"Theoretically,, we're supposed to
provide articles of interest to en-
gineers, not necessarily of actual
use," Stickles remarked.
This issue of the Technic will
show several changes over previous
years. The revisions will include
alumni' news, features on promi-
nent faculty members, extracurri-
cular activities in the engineering
college and jokes.
Among the difficulties of the
organization, Stickles listed their
lack of space and location in a
narrow room in the West Engi-
neering Annex, the lack of inter-
est among engineers in writing and
the attractions of "more glamor-
ous publications."
With 73 years of history, the
Technic is the oldest engineering
college magazine in the country,
It began as a yearbook of a Uni-
versity engineering society.
While not subject to the Board
of Student Publications, the Tech-
nic has a board of faculty ad-
visors.
Editors this year Include Stick-
les, .Jim Snediker, '55E, business
manager, Hank Mosteller, '55E,
managing editor and Carley Mei-
kle, '55E, associate editor, The
Technic will be sold today and to-
morrow in the Engineering Arch
at 25c a copy.

A gathering of the Cl
and our authentic Scot
suits and coats put youi
for Fall whether you're
job or on campus-impor
cause of the bright and
ing colors. Have yours
Watch, Royal Stewart,
King George, etc.-tar
banded together in ou
Shop.
plus ..
Those beautiful clan plai
crates" in the College Shop
Campus Toggery, includi
muds shorts, pedal pushers
shirts, skirts, and scarv

an . w
ch plaid
in shape
on the
tant be-
flatter-
in Black
Linday,
tans all
r Maina:.
d "sep-
p, at our
ing Ber-
," slacks"
FOREST
1st off
uth U.
nd at
111'1
,uth U.

A beautiful casual by
Printzess in Black Watch
plaid at matching cloche
at $59.95,
Perfect for under coats.
This easy mannered wor-
sted Flannel suit with its
campus-casualness . .
$49.95.
To mix or match as you
tike. This stuart plaid
suit at $49.95. Other
plaids from $39.50 to
$65.00.

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it's IIhter, whiter, firmer
it's a new
in dtacron!

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each
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fr ;,.

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WHAT A BUY! Chesterfield regular and king-
size. (Both at the same price in most places).
Jack Webb and Ben Alexander want what you want
from a cigarette. Relaxation, comfort, satisfaction. They

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