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October 19, 1954 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-19

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER x9,1954

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

LIONS FACE 49ERS:
NFL Title Contenders To Meet Sunday

By PHIL DOUGLIS
National Football League con-
tenders smash head-on this com-
ing weekend as the first and sec-
ond place teams in each division
meet in games that will go a long
way to deciding the eventual king-
pins' of the professional gridiron
world.
The front running Detroit Lions
meet the fast closing San Fran-
cisco 49ers in a big game on the
West Coast, while the high flying
Philadelphia Eagles tear into the
Pittsburgh Steelers in the Smoky
City.
Both games are loaded with im-
portance. The Lions and 49ers ap-
pear to be the best in the West-
ern loop, as a result of last week-
ends' action. The Rams are dead,
crumbling to Green Bay and elim-
inating themselves from conten-
tion, at least for the time being.
The Rams have only won once in
four starts. This leaves the Bears
and Colts, neither of which are of
title caliber. Therefore, all eyes
should be glued on Kezar Stadium
next Sunday afternoon.
In the Eastern Division, the
Philadelphia Eagles, who along
with Detroit, are the only unbeat-
en and untied team in pro foot-
ball, must meet the giant killing
Pittsburgh Steelers.
The Steelers, showing tremen-
dous power in topping the Cleve-
land Browns last Sunday, boast a
powerful passing game, and lookj
like a coming power. One cannot
discount, however, the fast im-
proving New York Giants, now
leading the league in scoring. In
1953, the Giants were last in that
department.
Passing Pays
These five contenders, along
with the youthful Green Bay'
Packers, all triumphed last Sun-
day, largely as a result of passing.
The 49ers were an exception to
this rule, rolling on the ground
as well as most teams move
through the air lanes. But perhaps
the most shocking affair of last
weekend's action was the demise of
the Cleveland Browns as a foot-
ball power.
The death-rattle of the once
mighty Browns echoed long and
loud over the league, as the Steel-
ers trampled the remains of one of
pro football's greatest dynasties
into the turf of Forbes Field to the
tune of 55-27. It was the worst loss
in Cleveland history.
The men who sent the once
mighty Browns into defeat were
Jimmy Finks, a plastic masked
juarterback who hurled four touch-

down passes, and Ray Mathews,
who caught three of them, and
ran for another.
Under the sodden skies of the
smoky city, Johnny Lattner,
Jackie Butler, Fran Rogel, and
Russ Craft rounded out the Pitt
touchdown parade, and coupled
with the performances of Mat-
thews and Finks, seem to give evi-
dence of a football power in the
making.
Packers Roll
In the upset of the day, some of
Milwaukee's sports revival must
have rubbed off on the Green Bay

pro league along with Detroit's
more Colts 35-0 in Briggs Stadium
Saturday night. The Lions switch-
ed to the air, in contrast to their
usual ground game, to blank the
Colts as Bobby Layne and Tom
Dublinski completed 22 of 35
passes for 335 yards, thereby re-
maining in first place in the West-
ern Division.
A near upset almost material-
ized in Chicago's Wrigley Field as
the fast rising Chicago Bears, the
third place team in the Western
Conference, lost a squeaker to the
San Francisco 49ers, 31-24. Joe
Perry, Hugh McElhenny and John
Johnson led a blistering ground
attack thatenabled the coast team
to overcome a three point Bear
halftime lead, and more than
match a second half Chicago ral-
ly.
The other entry from the Windy
City, the lacklustre Chicago Car-
dinals, ran into too much offense
at New York, and bowed to the
Giants, 31-17. The New Yorkers
leaped off to a two touchdown lead,
and never gave up, coasting to an
easy win.
Kyle Rote and Frank Gifford
each took pitchouts from quarter-
back Charlie Conerly and tossed
touchdown passes to get the Gi-
ants off and running. On the Car-
dinal side of the ledger, a 50 yard
field goal by George Summerall
provided the days high spot.
NFL STANDINGS

Macks Sell
A's After
54 Years
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA-The Philadel-
phia Athletics, starting a new era
under syndicate control after 54
years of rule by the Connie Mack
family, played a waiting game last
night, with little to do but accept
congratulations.
Among the felicitations were
telephone calls from Arnold John-
son, the Chicago businessman, who
sought to buy the franchise and
transfer it to Kansas City.
"I've talked with Roy and Earle
Mack and extended my best wish-
es," Johnson said. He expected
to leave at 5 p.m. for Chicago.
"But," he continued, "I'm still
puzzled about the whole thing."
His state of mind was under-
standable. Until late Sunday, the
47-year-old Chicagoan appeared a
shoo-in to be the next owner of
the club. He had offered close to
$3,375,000 to take over the fran-
chise, its debts and assets and to
move it to Kansas City. He had
received American League approv;
al last Tuesday to buy the club.
Then in four days a syndicate
was formed and it accomplished
something that had not been done
in four months, it bought 91-year-
old Connie Mack's 302 shares for
$604,000. Earle Mack, retiring gen-
eral manager and executive vice
president, was paid $450;000 for his
163 shares. Roy Mack was paid
$200,000 and reinvested $250,000 in
the new organization. He also re-
ceived a one-year contract as an
executive with the club at $25,000
a year.

I

COLUMBUS, Ohio (IP) -Th
odds-fellowsare having a tough
time picking a favorite for Sat-
urday's Wisconsin-Ohio State grid
game.
A certainty is that at least
83,400 fans will fill the big Buck-
eye horseshoe for the torrid tus-
sle.
Both the Badgers and Bucks are
unbeaten. Both are in the top 5

I

nationally. Both are in the Big
Ten. Both want to go to the Rose
Bowl.
And the statistics for four-game
winning streaks show they're just
that even on the field, too. Wis-
consin has rolled over Marquette,
Michigan State, Rice and Purdue,
while Ohio has turned back. In-
diana, California, Illinois.- and
Iowa.

OSU, Wisconsin Rated Even

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ON

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choose your
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diminishes your chances of finding
just the clothes you'd like best. Our
selection of the fine HYDE PARK
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and comprehensive we've had for six
years , . but choicest fabrics 'are still
Y" limited . . . imports especially ... and
a week from now you may discover that
some other fellow has beaten you to
the very ones you would have liked
most. Why let that happen . . . when
you can avoid it by making your
selection today.
HYDE PARK SUITS
from $55 to $69.50
By Hyde Park
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
Open Daily 9 to 5:30 -- Monday 9 to 8:30
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Tuesday thru Saturday 8:30 to 5:30

ROGER ZATKOFF
... sparks Packers

Packers, sparked by Tobin Rote,
they rushed by the favored Los
Angeles Rams, 35-17, and gave
coach Liz Blackbourn his first
pro victory. Roger Zatkoff, former
Michigan Star, sparked the Pack-
er line.
Scoring three touchdowns in
the final period, the Pack turned
Milwaukee's County Stadium into
bedlam. Rote was the star of the
day, throwing three TD passes,
and running for another. It was
the Packers first win of the sea-
son, and coming on the heels of
three heartbreaking defeats, it in-
dicates that the tiny Wisconsin
town is in for some better foot-
ball in the near future.
The high-flying Philadelphia
Eagles, paced by Adrian Burke's
phenominal s e v e n touchdown
passes, routed the Washington
Redskins, 49-21. The win pushed
the Birds into first place in the
Eastern Division.
Burke tied Sid Luckman's 1943
record of seven payoff passes, but
lost some of the glory to Wash-
ington rookie Dale Atkeson, who
rambled 99 yards on a kickoff re-
turn midway in the second pe-
riod.
Lions Still Lead
The Eagles remain the only un-
defeated and untied team in the
pro league along with Detroits

WesternI
DETROIT 3 0
S. Francisco 3 0
Chi. Bears 2 2
L. Angeles 1 2
Green Bay 1 3+
Baltimore 1 3+
Eastern1
Philadel. 4 0+
New York 3 1
Pittsburgh 3 1
Cleveland 1 2
Chi. Cards 0 4
Wash'ton 0 4

Division
0 1.000
1 1.000
0 .500
1 .333
0 .250
0 .250
Division
0 1.000
0 .750
0 .750
0 .333
0 .000
0 .000

104
119
85
92
75
29
136
137
135
68
50
56

26
72
91
80
71
125
69
68
78
90
138
178

}it.; ...; .:

I

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

i
mm

I

S

SPORTS
KEN COPP
Night Editor

.......

,...........,...,,

NHL STANDINGS
W L
SMontreal .............4 1
Detroit ..............4 1
New York ..,........2 2
Boston .,.......... 1 2
Toronto ..............O 2
Chicage . ...... 3

We're not the Biggest.
But ask your Buddy
He will tell you who's the Best.
6 EXPERTS TO SERVE YOU
715 N. University

T Pts.
1 9
0 4
2 4
S23
1 1

Don Sundstrom asks:

What are my
chances for
advancement in
a big firm
like Du Pont?

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Donald W. Sundstrom received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from
Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1953. He's currently studying for an M.S. degree
and expects to receive it next year. Like other engineering students, he's asking
a lot of searching questions before deciding on a permanent employer.

Jerry Risser answers:

GeraldJ.IRisser, B.S. Chem. Eng., Univ. of
Wisconsin (1937), is now assistant man-
ager of the Engineering Service Division
in Du Pont's Engineering Department, Wil-
mington, Delaware.

J THINK Iknowexactly what'sbehind that question,
Don, because the same thing crossed my mind
when I first graduated and looked around for a job.
That was about seventeen years ago, when the
Du Pont Company was much smaller than it is to-
day. And there's a large factor in the answer, Don,
right there! The advancement and growth of any
employee depends to a considerable degree on the
advancement and growth of his employer. Promo-
tion possibilities are bound to be good in an expand-
ing organization like Du Pont.
Right now, for example, construction is in prog-
ress or planned for three new plants. That means

from within the organization-on merit:
My own field, development work, is a natural for
a young graduate, because it's one of the fundamental
branches of engineering at Du Pont. There are com-
plete new plants to design, novel equipment prob-
lems to work on, new processes to pioneer-all sorts
of interesting work for a man who can meet a chal-
lenge. Many of the problems will involve cost studies
-some will require evaluation in a pilot plant-but,
in every case, they'll provide the satisfactions which
come from working with people you like and respect.
All in all, Don, your chances of advancement on
,.+ r mioh+h ondi nt DuPont!

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