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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1954 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TAB MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. nvTnIRP.,R. 1,7- 14-fa

THE MICHIGAN DAIlY ~TTh.TrbAV flC"Wfl1U~'U S'~ 1fi~A

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14

EDUCATORS' BIG PROBLEM:
German Young People
Must Express Opinions

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

s, :-: ' . pp
f F ty
' :: 9N.

By MARY ANN THOMAS
Speaking fluent English, which
only at times revealed traces of his
Teutonic origin and an incongru-
ous British accent, Erich E. Heck-
hausen remarked on the educa-
tional situation in West Germany.
"Biggest problem in Germany,"
he commented, "is to have the
young people take an interest in
current events. Germans have
been so used to obeying that they
must be encouraged to express
their feelings and formulate opin-
ions," the educator explained.
In contrast, Heckhausen con-
tinued, Americans are more ready
to discuss matters. "We are trying
to teach our young people that
they have a say in the matter."
'Oberstudiendirector'
The lanky, friendly German is
an 'Oberstudiendirector' or princi-
pal of - a girls' school in Lower
Saxony. On a 90-day tour of the
United States as a participant in
the Foreign Leader Program of the'
State Department's InternationalI
Educational Exchange Service,
Heckhausen spent the past weekI
in Ann Arbor.1
"As we feel that we are cram-1
ming too much into the children,"
Heckhausen added with a smile,
"we are seeking a combination of
American and Germanic approach-
es to education and are in the
process of getting adapted to
changes of society."
The Berlin-born educator nam-
ed the building shortage as anoth-
er serious problem. "With the im-
mense increase in population due
to immigration from behind the
Iron Curtain," he explained, "we
need 50% more school buildings."
To emphasize the need, Heck-
hausen explained that his second-
ary school was built to hold 400
students but has an enrollment of
1,300.
RENT-A-CAR I

"The biggest experience in my
life," he exclaimed, "was watch-
ing the football game last week."
Commenting that bullfights had
not thrilled him as much, Heck-
hausen called the game a "big so-
cial show."
"People, even old ones," he ob-
served enthusiastically, "sprang up
from their seats in a general out-
burst of vitality and love of life."
"And the colors!" His eyes lit up
as he exclaimed, with reference to
the bands, "I felt like I was in a
vast, tremendous garden."
Disappointed at EDC Defeat
Changing the subject to German
politics, Heckhausen remarked
that there was a slight disappoint-
ment at the defeat of EDC, "but
the growing confidence between
France and Germany was not dis-
turbed."
"Most Germans appreciate the
London treaty," he commented.
The German educator acknow-
ledged that the problem of reuni-
fication was a serious one that
must be solved, "but without af-
fecting the cordial relations be-
tween the United States and Ger-
many."
Study 4Institute
Works Quietly
Amidst Furor
PRINCETON, N.J. MP)- After
the Atomic Energy Commission
banned Dr. J. Robert Oppenheim-
er from access to secret atomic
data, scientists and interested lay-
men wondered whether the highly
regarded Institute for Advanced
Study would retain him as di-
rector.
They got the answer earlier this
month - Oppenheimer stays on.
The hot public controversy over
the man who directed much of this
nation's atomic research for war
was no deterrent to the Institute's
board, which named Oppenheim-
er unanimously.
What's it like, this institution
that goes quietly about its busi-
ness in the midst of furore?
Amid the plush green of a 600-
acre one-time farm tract, the In-
stitute stands a few miles outside
Princeton.
Here some of the world's most
famous scholars work and study.
Their equipment is largely office
space, blackboards, a library of
40,000 carefully selected volumes
and a staff of secretaries and as-
sistants.
The Institute opened its doors
21 years ago this month, housed
temporarily in a building of
Princeton University, although it
had-and has-no connection with
the university. Its own quarters
at Fuld Hall were completed in
1939.
Massey To Speak
Arthur Massey of the English
Ministry of Pensions and Nation-
al Insurance will discuss "The
English National Health Service"
at 4 p.m. tomorrow in the School
of Public Health auditorium.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1954
VOL. LXV, No. 23
Notices
PERSONAS INTERVIEWS NOT
PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED--
Thurs., Oct. 21-
Los Alamos Scientific Lab., Los Ala-
mos, New Mexico-interviews for Chem-
ists and Math. at Chem. Bldg., all day,
for Physicists at Physics-in the morn--'
ing only, and for Elect. Engrs. at En-
gineering-in the afternoon only. These
people will be interviewed for per-
manent technical positions.
In addition a Los Alamos man will
interview all day at Engr. for sum-
mer employment of graduate students
in all phases of the physical sciences
and undergraduates who will receive
their degrees in June and who intend
to continue with advanced studies.
This summer employment at Los Ala-
mos Lab. includes peopleain chem.,
physics, math., and engr.
Students wishing to make appoint-
ments for Los Alamos interviews should
contact the respective schools-Chem.
ext. 727, Physics ext 706. and 248 W.
Engr. ext. 2182.
Joseph Herman Shoe Co., Boston, Mass.
-B.A. in LS&A and Bus. Ad. for Whole-
sale Selling in the Michigan area,
Fri., Oct. 22-
Boy Scouts of America, Inc., Chicago,
Ill.-B.A. in LS&A and Bus. Ad. for
Boy Scout Executive.
Students wishing to make appoint-
ments for interviews with either of the
above should contact the Bureau of
Appoinntments, ext. 371, 3528 Admin.
Bldg.
PERSONNEL REQUEST
U. S. Army Corps of Engrs., Chicago
District, Chicago, Ill., has a vacancy for
an Information Officer, GS-010-12, to
be Chief, Tech. Liaison Branch. Re-
quires 6 yrs. of experience in journal-
ism-degree work may be substituted
for 3 of the yrs.
For further information about this
or other job opportunities, contact
the Bureau of Appointments, ext.
371, 3528 Admin. Bldg.
Lectures
University Lecture, auspices of the
English Department. Elmer Rice, play-
wright and producer, will speak on
"Censorship of the Arts." 4:10 p.m.,
Tues., Oct. 19, Rackham Lecture Hall.
A reception for those who would like
to meet Mr. Rice will be held in Rack-
ham Assembly Room immediately after
the lecture.
Extra Performance "Caine Mutiny
Court-Martial" Sat., Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.
Due to the heavy demand for seats,
"The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial" will
be held over for an extra performance
in addition to the Fri. evening presen-
tation on the 1954-55 Lecture Course
series. Starring Paul Douglas, Wendell
Corey and Steve Brodie with a large
supporting cast of over 20, this ver-
sion of the trial scene from Herman
Wouk's best-selling novel "The Caine
Mutiny" was adapted by the author
and directed by Charles Laughton.

Tickets are now 'on sale at the audi-
torium box office, which will be open
tomorrow through Sat. from 10 a.m.-
5 p.m. Good seats are available in all
price locations for the Sat. evening
performance. Students are advised that
the Sat. show will be out before 11:00
p.m., making it possible for them to
attend the dance after the show.
Academic Notices

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a fine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND

FOR SALE
BENZ MOTORS
TIP-TOP CHOICE USED CARS
1949 PACKARD, two door, $295.
1949 NASH, 2 door, $295.
1948 PLYMOUTH, 4 door, radio
and heater, $395.
Open evenings till 8:00 P.M.

Doctoral Examination for Harry Pal-
mer Sharp; Sociology; thesis: "Migra-
tion and Social Participation in the De-
troit Area," Mon., Oct. 18, 5615 Haven
Hall, at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, Ronald
Freedman.
Biological Chemistry Seminar: Dr.
Dominic Dziewiatkowski, an Associate
Fellow of the Rockefeller Institute, will
give a seminar at 4:30 p.m., Mon., Oct.
18 in Room 319 West Medical Building;
the title will be: "Fate of Sulfate-Sul-
fur in Animals."
Group preliminary doctoral examina-
tions in mathematics will be given at
the end of Nov. Will all students in-
tending to take this exam please leave
their names with the departmental
secretary by Thurs., Oct. 21. Anyone
in doubt as to whether to take the
exam can consult Prof. Myers.
Mathematics Colloquium will meet
Tues., Oct. 19, at 4:10 p.m., Room 3011
AH. Prof. C. L. Dolph will speak on
"Vector potential theory and scatter-
ing problems."
Concerts
Stanley Quartet will continue its
series of Sunday afternoon concerts of
the Beethoven cycle at 3:30 p.m., Oct.
17, in Rackham Lecture Hall. The sec-
ond program will open with the Quar-
ete in A major, Op. 18, No. 5, followed
by Quartet in F minor, Op. 95. After
intermission the group will play Quar-
tet in B-flat major, Op. 130. Additional
concerts will be presented on Nov. 7,
21, Dec. 12, and Jan. 9. All will be open
to the public without charge.
Faculty Concert Cancelled: The re-
cital by Frances Greer, soprano, pre-
viously announced for Mon., Oct. 18, in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, has been
cancelled because of illness. The new
date will be announced later.
Events Today
Informal Folk Sing at Muriel Les-
ter Co-op, on Sun., Oct. 17 at 8:00 p.m.
Everybody invited!
Movies. Free movie, "String of Beads,"
Oct. 12-18. Films are shown daily at
3:00 and 4:00 p.m., including Sat. and
Sun., with an extra showing on Wed.
at 12:30. Fourth floor Exhibit Hall,
Museums Building.
Hillel: All Sororities, Fraternities, and
Independents are invited and urged to
attend a Sukkos Open House at Hillel,
Sun., 4:00-5:30 p.m. Refreshments will
be served. 6:00 p.m.-Supper Club fol-
lowed by record dance.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild:
A student panel will present "Apprais-
ing and Using My Religious Heritage"
at the 7:00 p.m. meeting of the Student
Guild in the Mayflower Room, Sun.,
Oct. 17. Panel members are: Margue-
rite Long, Lois Nowak, Gershom Morn-
ingstar, and Pete Vandervoort. All stu-
dents are welcome.
(Continued on Page 4)

331 S. 4th Ave.

NO 2-5523
)84B

LOST: Tan Raincoat, Barocuta trade-
mark, in Angell Hall, Aud. A. Phil.
31 Lecture at 10 Thursday. -Call NO
3-2067. )19A
LOST-Kar4a Delta sorority pin at
football stadium. Call NO 2-5631 or
return to 1620 Cambridge Road. )18A
FOR SALE
1948 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, good body,
motor and tires, $215. Call Jim Mul-
laney, NO 2-5695 )79B
ALL SEASON zipper lining coat, Size
12. Call Susie, NO 2-4401, 309 Chicago
House. )88B
GE 10" CONSOLE TV, excellent con-
dition, $50.00. Phone NO 2-5429. )85B
1954 PLYMOUTH Convertible, black
Continental tire, all accessories, like
new. Cost in May, $3150. Sell for
$2075. NO 3-1184, between 6 and 7.
)83B
Cars Priced for the
Student's Pocket Book
1941 OLDSMOBILE SEDAN, ra-
dio and heater, $75.
1946 PONTIAC, 4 door, radio
and heater, $95.
1941 DE SOTO, 2 door, good
runner, $75.
1948 NASH CANVERTIBLE, $145.
1946 HUDSON SEDAN, $95.
1937 CHEVROLET, 2 door, $45.
1947 PLYMOUTH Convertible,
$195.
1951 HENRY J, $295.
1951 STUDEBAKER, $545.
Used Car Lots:
503 E. Huron, NO 2-3261
East Ann Arbor, corner of Packard
and Platt, NO 2-0171
Both lots open evenings till 9:00
)78B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B
1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runs perfect, good top. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )64B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )69B

1949 STUDEBAKER, 4 door, maroon,
radio, heater, over-drive, real clean
car. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 2221
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )65B
1949 FORD Custom Made radio, heater,
good rubber, real clean. See Smitty,j
the big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )61B
XMAS CARDS from $1.95 up. Represent-
ing National Detroit. 10% and 15%
discounts. Contact Bob McCarty, 301
Michigan House, W.Q., Mail only. )9I
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University, )11B
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales, 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
ARMY-NAVY type Ozfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Gpod con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 8. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS APT. for four men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. -140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )30
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

tOOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve -rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
HELP WANTED
WANTED: 5 ambitious male students
by national firm for training for sales
positions. Earn $35.00 to $55.00 weekly.
No canvassing. Car necessary. Inter-
view in Room 3528, Ad building,
Tues., Oct. 19 from 12 to 4:30 p.m.
WANTED: Students interested in form-
ing Marionette Theater group. De-
signs, construction, lighting, acting,
playwriting, etc. NO 3-3854 even-
ings. )12H
WANTED: Kitchen help. We have one
opening for help in kitchen, terms
all meals plus cash, room for several
boarders also, contact house man-
ager at NO 2-8312. )11H
WANTED-Girl or Boy to help with
light housework and care of child-
ren, in exchange for room and meals.
No4week-end help required. Call NO
3-3404. )10H
WANTED: Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Morning hours, very good sal-
ary. Route open in U. Terrace and
Hospital area. Call NO 2-3241,
STUDENTS WIVES wanted for part
time work either mornings or after-
noons. Apply in person, Goldman
Brothers Cleaners, 214 S. State St. )7H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
ialize in winter cottons and blouses,
wool soxs washed also. )8I
RAD IO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481

I

,

!r

Make FOLLETTS
your browsing headquarters

LICENSEE
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and oil
and Insurance.
Phone
NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor -Sales
I nc.

POCKET BOOKS
SIGNET BOOKS
MENTOR BOOKS
BANTAM BOOKS
IMAGE BOOKS

ANCHOR BOOKS
VINTAGE BOOKS
MODERN LIBRARY
RINEHARDT LIBRARY
REPRINTS

I

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and Best Sellers
SHOP and SAVE at
FOLLETTS'

' II i 11 IuII:
They're Laughing-Loving
Singing It Up!!,,
TIC tOOR
AET LEIH R
I FRED CLARK -SHEREE NORTH
als
Loveless! Beautiful!
Dangerous!
NEN 11

State Street at North University I

Visit Weber's This Week-End

.

Cinema SL qd/4

ORPEUM
ENDING TODAY

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4

THE GHOST
AND MRS. MUIR
REX HARRISON
GENE TIERNEY
Sunday 8:00 only

_,- ',COWARD'S
"" A Arierm a
SNodl Coward&S
at:30.
Coming FRIDAY
FtarnR est
starig OBRTMORLEY

RECORD DANCE

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Delicious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
DINNERS
Try Our Tempting H
3715
Jackson Rd. wOb

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
CHAMPAGNE

omemade Pastries

8:00 -10:30

THE UNION
TERRACE ROOM
FREE
Every Sunday Nite

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50c

Open Daily
12 to 9:30 P.M.

Architecture Auditorium

For your Sunday enjoyment -PAUL TOMPKINS
I at the HAMMOND from 1:30-8:30 P.M.

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Cinema S Qi

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BOSTON SYMPHONY ''

FALL PROGRAM

October 16-17-THE GHOST AND MRS.
with Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney

MUIR

TECHNICOLOR
Clifton June
WEBB -ALLYSON
Van Lauren
HEFLIN-BACALL
Fred MACMURRAY
Arlene Cornel
DAHL WILDE
A 30th Ce.ntury-fo xbrouction

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor -
WED., OCT. 20, 8:30
CONCERTGEBOUW
AMSTERDAM ORCHESTRA
EDUARD VAN BEINUM, Conductor
WED., OCT. 27, 8:30
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor

October 21-22-DREAMBOAT with Clifton Webb
and Ginger Rogers
October 23-24-TIGHT LITTLE ISLAND
October 28-29-THE MALTESE FALCON with H.
Bogart
October 30-31-To Be Announced
November 4-5-THE SEA HAWK with Errol Flynn
November 6-7-DAVID AND BATHSHEBA (Tech-
nicolor) with Susan Hayward, Gregory Peck
November 11-12 I1WAS A MALE WAR BRIDE with
Cary Grant, Ann Sheridan
November 13-14-GIGI (French)
November 18-19-PRINCE OF FOXES with Tyrone
Power, Orson Welles, Wanda Hendrix
November 20-21-To Be Announced

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY a-nnounces its 1954-55 season
"FILMS OF THE FANTASTIC"
Opening OCTOBER 18 with
JEAN COCTEAUS' "ORPHEUS"
and the first showing in this country of "The Name of the Capital is Warsaw"
-A Venice Film Festival Award Winner from Poland
NOVEMBER 15 FEBRUARY 28
MAD WEDNESDAY, with Harold Lloyd THE INVISIBLE MAN, s
the story of a comeback with Claude Rains
the story of a duty
NOVEMBER 29 MsRyH 21
FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER, MACH 21
by E. A. Poe THE CRAZY RAY,
the story of a decline directed by Rene Clair
the story of a freeze
JANUARY 3 APRIL 11
THE ROCKING HORSE WINNER, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE,
with John Mills directed by Frank Capra
the story of a lust the story of a thaw
JANUARY 24 MAY 2
DESTINY, directed by Fritz Lang DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE,
the story of a love with John Barrymore

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