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October 14, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TMRaDAY. OCTOBER 14. A ANAL

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Bossart Traces Career as Accompanist

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

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By DAVID KAPLAN
"Accompanying s h o u 1 d be
taught as an art instead of the
role of a disappointed pianist,"
commented Eugene Bossart who
has accompanied noted soloists
from the Metropolitan Opera and
is now on the School of Music
faculty.
Born in Erie, Pa., Bossart start-
ed his accompanying career when
he was 11 years old as pianist for
the local male chorus. At 14 years
of age, he began playing the piano
in a local vaudeville house.
Won Scholarship
After he was graduated from
high school, Bossart went on the
road playing for Junior League
shows. After six months he won a
scholarship to the Curtis Institute
of Music in Philadelphia.
In 1939, he went into the Phila-
delphia Opera Company as assist-
ant conductor where he met Fran-
ces Greer (now on the School of
Music faculty). He was accompan-
ist for concerts around Philadel-
phia and then went on a tour of
the South.
It was during this tour that Bos-
sart accompanied Miss Greer in
her first professional concert
which took place in her home town
of Helena, Ark.
$250 Award
Bossart received his diploma
from the Curtis Institute in 1942,
and at graduation received the
Curtis Award of $250 for the stu-
dent "most likely to succeed."
When Bossart was discharged
from the army in 1946, Zimbalist
recommended him to Columbia
Artists Management in New York.
He auditioned for Charles Kull-
man of the Metropolitan and went
on tour with him for six weeks.
With Columbia Artists
"This was my entry into Colum-
bla Artists," he said. The next
year, Bossart was accompanist for
instrumentalists and soloists un-
der the management of Columbia
Artists.
In 1951, after competitive ex-
aminations, he became the exclu-
sive accompanist for Gladys Swar-
thout of the Metropolitan Opera.
As her accompanist, he toured
South America and the West In-
dies.
That summer, he went to Eur-
ope with Miss Swarthout and was
musical advisor and coach for 26
television films made in Rome,
Italy, with stars from the Metro-
politan and La Scala in Milan.
Began Coaching
After returning from Europe,
Bossart began his coaching acti-
vities in New -York with artists
from the New York City Center
Opera Company and the Metro-,
politan.
"I was very interested in getting
my roots in a university where ac-
companying is taught as an art
and that is why I chose the Uni-
versity of Michigan," he said.
He will be teaching accompany-
ing in both instrumental and vo-
cal fields, and will assist in coach-,
ing vocal students for graduate
and senior recitals.

L:

-Daily-John Hirtzel
EUGENE BOSSARRT OF THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC FACULTY
SINGLE ROOMS:
Segregation of Negroes at U.
Of N1.C. Stirs Up Students
e e

A storm of student protest and
inquiry arose at the University of
North Carolina this week when it
was revealed that the only two
Negroes at the university are liv-
ing in a segregated dormitory sec-
tion.
Where the usual setup in the
dormitory system at North Caro-
lina is for three students to oc-
cupy a room, Romalus Murphy
and James Slade, Negro graduate
students, have single rooms on the
third floor of Steele Dormitory
with the two adjacent rooms va-
cant.
Section Reserved
James E. Wadsworth, university
housing officer, stated that as
early as last fall, before any ap-
plications had been received from
Negro students, this section was
reserved for Negroes despite a long
waiting line for dorm space. He
declined to disclose the source of
these instructions.
Other high officials in the ad-
ministration were equally vague
about who was responsible for the;
edict. University President Gordon
Gray said "I just don't remember.
I doubt that the Board of Trustees
made the decision."
Investigation by the campus
newspaper, The Tarheel, did not
reveal a state law demanding the]
segregation of Negro students.
Moreover, the Supreme Court, in
the case of G. W. McLaurin vs.1

the Oklahoma State Regents for
Higher Education, declared that a
colored student admitted to a
state-supported graduate school
must receive the same treatment
from the state students of other
races.
Illegal Action
Thus it is ruled that it was illegal;
for the University of Oklahoma toj
require McLaurin to live in sep-
arate quarters, to eat in a special
section of the cafeteria, and to
study in a special section of the
library.
Despite the segregation issue
which whirled over their heads,
Slade and Murphy remained the
calmest of the involved parties.
Said Slade, "I didn't give segrega-
tion a thought. I was thinking
about all the big assignments we'd
have in Med school."
Demand Action
But while the two students are
absorbed in their classwork, Chapel
Hill rings with demands for the
abolition of their segregation. Ap-
plications have been received by
the housing department for quart-
ers in the vacant space in Steele
Dorm.
The possibility of state action
was foreshadowed by Chancellor
Robert B. House when he said he
could not comment "in advance
of the state ruling." He refused
to elaborate.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construe-.
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Buildingbefore 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 20
otices
Graduate Record Examination: Appli-
cation blanks for the Nov. 20 adminis-
tration of the Graduate Record Exam-
ination are now available at 110 Rack-
ham Building. This examination will be
administered at the University of De-
troit. Application blanks are due in
Princeton, N.J., not later than Nov. 5.
Choral Union Members are reminded
to pick up their courtesy passes admit-
ting to the concert by the Societa Cor-
elli, on the day of the concert Fri.,
Oct. 15, between 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.
and 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the offices of
the University Musical Society in Bur-
ton Tower.
The University Senate will hold a
special meeting Thurs., Oct. 28, at 4:15
p.m. in the Rackham Lecture Hall. Sug-
gestions concerning matters to be con-
sidered should be made to Dr. Richard
Porter, who is chairman of a com-
mittee appointed to plan the agenda.
The following student sponsored so-
cial events are approved for the coming
week-end. Social chairmen are remind-
ed that requests for approval for so-
cial events are due in the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs not later than 12 a.m. on
the Mon. prior to the event:
Oct. 15-
Taylor
Oct. 1--
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Alpha Phi Alpha
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Chicago
Chi Phi
Chi Psi
Delta Sigma Pi
Delta Theta Phi
Gomberg
Huber
Phi Delta Phi
Phi Kappa Tau
PsitOmega
Scott
Van Tyne
Williams
Oct. 17-
Phi Delta Phi
Reeves, Kleinstueck
Academic Notices
Engineering Mechanics Seminar: Mr.
George Sonneman will speak on "Sta-
bility of a Paravane" at 4:00 p.m. on
Thurs., Oct. 14, in Room 101 West En-
gineering Building.
Seminar in Appie.q Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Oct. 14, at 4:00 p.m. in
Rm. 247 West Engineering. Speaker:
Dr. John Giese, visiting Lecturer. Top-
ic: Canonical Equations for Nn-linear-
ized Irrotational Conical Flow.
401 Interdisciplinary Seminar in Ap-
plication of Mathematics to Social Sci-
ence will meet on Thurs., Oct. 14,
room 3401 Mason Hall from 4:00-5:30
p.m. J. R. P. French will speak on
Small Theory of Leadership.
LS&A Students: Ang student with the
grade of "L" "X, or "no report" on
his record for a course taken the last
period he was in residence, must have
the course completed by Fri., Oct. 15th
or the grade will lapse to an "E." Ex-
tension of time beyond this date to
make up the incompetes will be for
extraordinary cases only. Such exten-
sions of time may be discussed with
the Chairman of the Academic Coun-
selors for Freshmen and Sophomores.
or with the Chairman of the Counsel-
ors for Juniors and Seniors.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a fine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: BROWN WALLET on North Uni-
versity. Call Margaret Stein, 331
Mosher. )14A
LOST: ANDERSON PATHOLOGY BOOK
on campus. Call Ted Harrison, NO
3-0676. )15A
FOR SALE
1954 PLYMOUTH Convertible, black
Continental tire, all accessories, like
new. Cost in May, $3150. Sell for
$2075. NO 3-1184, between 6 and 7.
)83B
1945 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, good body,
motor and tires, $215. Call Jim Mul-
laney, NO 2-5695. )79B
ATTENTION FRATERNITIES: Foldii
8-man Poker Table, felt covered, ex-
cellent condition, $25. Phone NO
3-2862. )80B
1947 OLDS, 2 door sedan, R&H, Hydra-
mnatic. A steal at $195. Call NO 3-3500.
)81B
LEAVING U of M, must sell '53 Morris
Miner, excellent condition, 38 mpg.
$700 or offer. NO 3-2791. )82B
ATTENTION GLEE CLUB MEMBERS.
Size 40 tails, good shape, $30. Phone
NO 2-9016. )77B
1947 MERCURY Stationwagon, new
tires, new battery, radio and heater.
Motor in perfect condition, priced for
quick sale. NO 2-1587. )73B

FOR SALE
Cars Priced for the'
Student's Pocket Book
1941 OLDSMOBILE SEDAN, ra-
dio and heater, $75.
1946 PONTIAC, 4 door, radio
and heater, $95.
1941 DE SOTO, 2 door, good
runner, $75.
1948 NASH CANVERTIBLE, $145.
1946 HUDSON SEDAN, $95.
1937 CHEVROLET, 2 door, $45.
1947 PLYMOUTH Convertible,
$195.
1951 HENRY J, $295.
1951 STUDEBAKER, $545.
Used Car Lots:
303 E. Huron, NO 2-3261
East Ann Arbor, corner of Packard
and Platt, NO 2-0171
Both lots open evenings till 9:00
)78B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car'
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B
SIX RATTAN CHAIRS, four rattan
tables, one rattan couch, Royal Vac-
uum cleaner with attachments, car-
pet sweeper, steel utility cabinet,
two chests of drawers, Croflex "D"
f 3.5 with flash and accessories, all
excellent condition, priced cheap for
quick sale. Dr. R. W. Deatrick, Uni-
versity Hospital or NO 3-2354 any-
time. )74BI
BENZ MOTORS
TIP-TOP CHOICE USED CARS
1951 DELUXE CHEVROLET, two
door, radio, heater, exception-
ally low mileage. Priced at
$795.

FOR SALE
1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runs perfect, good top. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )64B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )69B
1949 STUDEBAKER, 4 door, maroon,
radio, heater, over-drive, real clean
car. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )65B
1949 FORD Custom Made radio, heater,
good rubber, real clean. See Smitty,
the big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )61B
XMAS CARDS from $1.95 up. Represent-
ing National Detroit. 10% and 15%
discounts. Contact Bob McCarty, 301
Michigan House, W.Q., Mail only. )9I
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS APT. for four men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. *140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )30
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D

ROOM AND BOARD
HOME COOKING for men. Well bal-
anced meals. Rebates. 1319 Hill St.
Call NO 2-6422. )4E
HELP WANTED
STUDENT WHO DESIRES HOME with
family in exchange for household
duties. Private room and meals pro-
vided. Must like children. Call NO
3-3404. )8H
WANTED: Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Morning hours, very good sal-
ary. Route open in U. Terrace and
Hospital area. Call NO 2-3241.
STUDENTS WIVES wanted for part
time work either mornings or after-
noons. Apply in person, Goldman
Brothers Cleaners, 214 S. State St. )7H
PERSONAL
THE NEW YORKER is now available at
8c-yes 8c a copy to all students with
ID cards. Phone Student Periodical,
NO 2-3061. )20r
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
ialize in winter cottons and blouses,
wool soxs washed also. )8I
RAD IO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free P'ick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
MISCELLANEOUS
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Life ..................... $3 (8 mos.)
Newsweek ............... $2 (8 mos.)
New Yorker.............. $3 (8 mos.)
Sat. Eve. Post ........ $3.50 (35 wks.)
Time.................$2 (8 mos.)
U. S. News...........$3.27 (44 wks.)
Phone Student Periodical, NO 2-3061,
days, eves.

-

4

Daily
Classifieds
Bring
Results

1950 DODGE four door, factory
installed heater, new tires,
$695.

I U

II

1942 CHEVROLET, runs very well
ready to go, $95.
Open evenings till 8:00 P.M.
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-5528
)70B

Sneak Preview Tonight

10
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1

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EXPANSION?:
Social Fraternities Approach
Membership Saturation Point

TONIGHT
In addition to regular program we will
preview a new production. Come at 7
or 9 o'clock.
PREVIEW IS AT 9 O'CLOCK
It's both preceded and followed by
the regular program!
"SITTING BULL"
No EXTRA CHARGE
We cannot divulge title of preview.
Starting Friday
TOP STAR CAST in
"WOMAN'S WORLD"

Only two days left
to make senior Picture
appointments.
Sign up on Diag Between 9-3 and at the
Student Publications Building between 1 -5
Return proofs now between 12-5:30 and 6:30-9

ORPH EUM
Starting FRIDAY
3 Sketches from the
Master Craftsman!!
yy ~SMASH STAGE HI
T" NOEL
A WAl MOVI'
j. AMw Rank pme lt
Noel Omard's
0o n y E rialS~~lgy
in C41 GR -Ofti
ANO Eli- ELPAEWS .KAY
CARTOON - NEWS

(Continued from Page 1)

or four lacking a sufficient mem-
bership.
Due to the record rushing reg-
istration, a larger pledge total was
expected by IFC officials but many
rushees were disappointed because
houses couldn't incorporate the in-
crease.
Additionally many first semester
freshman rushees elected to wait
until second semester to pledge.
These men along with additional
rushees will have to be partially
absorbed in the spring.
While speaking of the necessity
of expansion, Zerman also empha-
sized the expected future increased
University enrollment.
It has been suggested that ac-
tive campus chapters enlarge
themselves diverting their excesses
to annexes.
Annexes Sometimes Satisfactory
According to Zerman this situa-
tion is generally satisfactory if
annexes can be obtained close to
the chapter house. However if the
annexes are a great distance away,
internal difficulties sometimes be-
come prevalent.
However most fraternities aren't
interested in increasing their mem-
bership. They desire to keep the
compact group that presently ex-

ists adding pledges only to fill the
holes left by graduation.
To activate a chapter at the Uni-
versity, - a fraternity's executive
secretary and enthused alumni
must demonstrate a desire to join
the campus fraternity system.
The Student Affairs Committee
scrutinizes its national standing, as
well as other factors and then
passes on its entrance to the sys-
tem.
The SAC sub-committee on hous-
ing inspects its plans for housing
and finances.
After a fraternity is admitted it
generally takes from five to ten
years for it to become a strong
member of the IFC.
Police To Auction
Unclaimed Bikes
Forty-four unclaimed bicycles
will be placed on the auction block
at 10 a.m. Saturday in the park-
ing lot next to City Hall at S.
Fifth Ave. and Huron.
Ranging from English bicycles
through mongrel types, the bikes
may be claimed by their owners
anytime before Saturday by bring-
ing proof to the police that the
vehicles are theirs.

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