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October 13, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-13

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDlNESDTAY.. OCTfTBER 13.1954

.... -4Na "u A-i.,ap vViv.i.siaiL..LOV 1e7JY

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'TOUCH ONE OUTLET':
Medical Societies Fight Fee Splitting

FIEDS

PET GOLDFISH uses largest college owned naval tanks as priv-
ate pool.
Pet Goldfish Uses U'Naval
Tank for PersonalHome

s,.

By MARY LEE DINGLER
Until a year and a half ago the
still deep waters of the largest
college-owned naval tank in the
United States were uninhabited.
At that time the West Engineer-'
ing Bldg. held an open house and
a young visitor, deciding that the
tank should have some occupants,
deposited in its dark recesses two
small goldfish.
Unfortunately, one of the littlel
swimmers was unable to adjust to
a copper compound mixed in with
some 600,000 gallons of his native
element and passed on. But the
second was made of sterner stuff.'
Goldfish Joey, more than a lit-
tle black around the gills from
copper, considers the tank his
home.
Quite Sociable
Joey is quite sociable and always
eager to see new faces. So eager,
in fact, that all the visitor need
'Victory Ball' Set
To Honor Owens
Gov. G. Mennen Williams will
attend a "Victory Ball" for Demo-
cratic Congressional candidate
Henry Owens Saturday night in
the Ann Arbor Armory.
All Democratic candidates from
the Washtenaw County ticket,
along with senatorial aspirant Pat-
rick McNamara and James Hare,
ary of State, are expected to at-
Democratic candidate for Secre-
tend.
The purpose of the dance is to
raise money for the Owens cam-
paign, and to give voters in sur-
rounding areas an opportunity to
meet the candidates.
Hypnotism Talk
"Hypnotism" will be the sub-
ject of a talk given by Elton B.
McNeil of the psychology depart-
ment at a meeting of the psychol-
ogy club today.
The meeting will be held at 7:30
p.m. in the League.
(Paid Political Advertisement)
Hear
Sen. Charles
POTTER
at
IKE's BIRTHDAY PARTY
(Paid Political Advertisement)
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

do is stand at one end of the plat-
form and stamp on it. Whether
he is the full length of the tank
away, or merely resting under his
caller's feet, Joey will surface to
greet the intruder.
When he is at the far end Joey
has a swim of 360 feet, but if the
visitor is patient he will not be
disappointed.
Not Cramped
Joey certainly isn't cramped. His
tank is 22 feet wide and varies in
depth from 10 to 14 feet. In the
center is a platform which serves
as a false bottom and enables 'the
tank to duplicate shallow condi-
tions.
While Joey may feel a lack of
companions of his own species, he
is not entirely alone. The tank is
used to test scale ship and barge
models so Joey's waters are not
always calm and peaceful.
During Experimental Work
Though he may not know it,
Joey has been present during ex-
perimental work as the tank has
been used in research to improve
propulsion systems for the freight-
ers of the Great Lakes. Joey's tank
has also been used as a proving
ground for many of the ships in
the gulf stream.
Blissfully Unaware
Blissfully unaware of these in-
terruptions, Joey takes life in his
swim. Occasionally, however,,
something out of the ordinary does
occur.'
At the present time, Joey is su-
pervising the repair work on the
wheels of the tank, which are a
little worn out after a half-cen-
tury of service.
Corelli Ensemble
To Give Concert

By CHARLES MERCER
CHICAGO ()-Doctors, being
people, vary almost as widely as
the rest of the human species.
Thus generalizations about them
are dangerous. Yet it's possible to
make these:
1. There are more better-trained
physicians in the United States
today than in any country in the
world.
2. American physicians, with
many notable exceptions, are as
sensitive to public criticism of the
profession as cooking gas to a
match. Touch one outlet and the
whole burner flames up.
No Layman Competent
In physical crisis no layman is
competent to pass on the medical
judgment of any physician. But in
ethical crisis any layman of sound
mind is perfectly competent to
pass on the judgment of any phy-
sician.
When a physician tries to rise
above the ethical-not medical-
judgments of his fellow humans
he creates public resentments
against his profession. The great
majority of honest doctors there-
by suffer from the actions of the
unethical.
Unethical Practice
Occasionally unethical practice
takes a flagrant form, as in New
York two years ago when the
World-Telegram and Sun exposed
a racket by a ring of unethical
doctors and druggists who organ-
ized drug firms and were splitting
the profits. In many cases the doc-
tors overprescribed or wrote need-
less prescriptions for harmless
drugs which the neighborhood
druggists filled fith the firms'
products. Patients were financially
trapped.
New York State Atty, Gen. Na-
thaniel Goldstein ordered an in-
vestigation and eventually for-
warded the names of 342 doctors
and 230 druggists to the State
Board of Regents, which supervis-
es licensing. The board "censur-
ed" 187 doctors and told them if
they did it again they'd lose their
licenses.
State governments universally
appear reluctant to punish any but
the most grossly unethical doctors.
They leave it to medical societies
to police their own ranks in such
problems as fee splitting.
What is fee splitting?
Fee Splitting
Here's a typical example: A man
has a pain in the abdomen. His
family doctor diagnoses the pain
as appendicitis and refers him to
a surgeon who removes the appen-
dix. The family doctor sends the
man a bill for $10 and the sur-
geon sends a bill for $200. Then
the surgeon slips the family doc-
tor $75 for referring the case to
him.
"It is immoral for a doctor to
select a specialist for any patient
to whom he wouldn't go himself
or send a member of his family.
If a doctor's judgment is swayed
by money the patient isn't getting
an even break."
So said Dr. Paul R. Hawley, di-
rector of the American College of
Surgeons (ACS), the other day. To
the accompaniment of howls and
growls from some elements of the
medical profession, Dr. Hawley
and the College of Surgeons have
taken the lead in holding up to
scrutiny the implications of fee
splitting as they affect both pa-
tients and doctors.
All national medical organiza-
tions say fee splitting is wrong.
Yet some doctors split fees. Fee-
splitting is illegal in 23 states. Yet
there is no record of any doctor
ever having been brought to court

in the United States on charges
of fee splitting.
Accepting Rebates
For many years some doctors of
weak moral fiber have been ac-
cepting rebates from druggists, op-
ticians, commercial chemical la-
boratories, X-ray specialists-even
undertakers. But the highly re-
spected American College of Sur-
geons under the direction of Dr.
Hawley was the first large medi-
cal organization to bring the sub-
ject out of the profession's closet.
No one knows how many doctors
indulge in such unethical practice
today. Certainly, however, they're
a minority.
Morally Wrong
"Fee splitting is morally wrong
not just because of the financial
transaction involved," said Dr.
Hawley at ACS headquarters here.
"One of its worst aspects is that
it easily leads to unjustified sur-
gery."
Thus, ACS fellows in Indianapo-
lis, Ind., founded a surgical society
there last year patterned on the
Columbus plan after investigators
had found some unjustified surgery
in two local hospitals. Now the
membership of the society includes
more than half of the physicians
doing major surgery in Indianapo-
lis.
The Detroit Surgical Society was
founded about the same time as
the Indianapolis society under the
concept of the Columbus plan. Its
members now include about two
of every three physicians doing
major surgery in the city. Its lead-
ers tell the ACS that fee splitting
has diminished greatly in Detroit.
Some doctors say there is no

reason for an able specialist to
indulge in fee splitting. If a spe-
cialist is really good, he'll have
more patients than he can handle,
they claim.
Caught in Web
Others say that excellent spe-
cialists sometimes find them-
selves caught up in webs where
fee splitting has been an accepted
practice in the community for
many years. They feel they have
to go along, in order to survive-
although they don't like it. If some
were convinced they could turn
over a new leaf and a statute of
limitations would protect them
from investigation of the past, they
would immediately stop splitting
fees.
Those are problems of the medi-
cal profession.
What Can Patient Do?
But what can the patient do to
protect himself from fee splitting?
You can demand separate, item-
ized bills from physicians who at-
tend you.
You can go to the specialist to
whom your referring physician
goes himself and sends members
of his own family.
You can discuss with your doctor
the cost of a proposed course of
treatment when possible-which
will make the relationship a much
happier affair, says the AMA.
If .you believe you're the victim
of flagrantly unethical practice,
you can bring your case before
your local medical society media-
tion committee. An AMA spokes-
man says there are now about 500
such committees which ; annually
hear an estimated 15 to 20 griev-
ances each.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 . 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: BROWN WALLET on North Uni-
versity. Call Margaret Stein, 331
Mosher. )14A
LOST: ANDERSON PATHOLOGY BOOK
on campus. Call Ted Harrison, NO
3-0676. )15A
LOST: PAIR BROWN GLOVES Satur-
day morning. Reward. Box 207 Win-
chell. )16A
LOST: BLACK LEATHER PURSE, Fri-
day night. Contact Elaine Domke, NO
2-3225. )17A

FOR SALE

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be*
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday).
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1954
VOL. LXV, No. 19
Notices
Graduate Record Examination: Appli-
cation blanks for the Nov. 20 adminis-
tration of the Graduate Record Exam-.
ination are now available at 110 Rack-
ham Building. This examination will be
administered at the University of De-
troit. Application blanks are due in
Princeton, N.J., not later than Nov. 5.
Late permission for women students
who attended the Eleanor Steber con-
cert on Sun., Oct. 10, will be no later
than 11:20 p.m.
PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
For Week of Oct. 18
Representatives from the following
companies will conduct personal inter-
views on the campus at Engineering:
Mon., Oct. 18
Northrop Aircraft, Inc., Hawthorne,
Calif.-Al degree levels of Engr., Math.,
and Physics for Research and Design.
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.,
represented by Mich. Bell Telephone,
Bell Telephone Labs., Western Electric
Co., & Sandia Corp.-All degree levels
of Engr., "Chem., Math, and Physics for
Engr., Research and Development.
Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St.
Louis, Missouri-B.S., M.S. & Ph.D. in
Chem. E. for General Chem. Engr.,
Process Design, Development (Pilot
Plant), & Production.
Tues., Oct. 19
Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St.
Louis, Mo.-See above-a.m. only on
Oct. 19.
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.
-See above.
Boering Airplane Co., Seattle, Wash-

The Societa Corelli, an ensemble
of 14 string players from Rome,
Italy, will give the second concert
in the Choral Union Series at 8:30
p.m. Friday in Hill Auditorium.
Each a recognized master of his
instrument, the musicians of the
Societa Corelli are now in the
midst of their second transconti-
nental tour, with the cooperation
of the Italian Government.
Last year's tour marked the
300th anniversary of the birth of
Arcangelo Corelli, the early class-
ical musician for whom the group
is named.
Their program will include
works by Corelli, Rossini, Vivaldi
and Vinci.
Tickets are still available at the
offices of the University Musical
Society in Burton Tower. Ticket
prices are: $3, $2.50, $2 and $1.50.

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All degree levels in Aero., Civil, Mech.,
and E. Engr., and Engr. Mechanics.
M.S. & Ph.D. in Engr. Math. and Phys-
ics for Research, Design and Production.
Diebold, Inc,, Canton, Ohio-B.S. in
Mech. & E.E. for Research, Sales Engr.,
Production Engr., and Methods Engr.
Sohio, The Standard Oil Co., Man-
ufacturing Dept., Cleveland, Ohio-B.S.
& M.S. in Chem., Mech., Ind., Civil,
and E.E., and Chemistry for Formal
Training Course for Technical Gradu-
tes.
Bendix Aviation Corp., Bendix Ra-'
dio Div., Baltimore, Md.-All degree lev-
els in Mech. & E.E., and Engr. Physics
for Research, Design and Development
in all phases of electronic equipment.
Wed., Oct. 20
BoeingvAirplane Co., Seattle, Wash.
See above.
Sohio, The Standard Oil Co., Manu-
facturing Dept., Cleveland, Ohio-See
above.
Bendix Aviation Corp., Mishawala
Div., Products Div., Research Labs., and
Radio Div.-which will also be here on
Oct. 19, see Radio Div. above. B.S. &
M.S. in Aero, Mech., Metal., & Elect.
E. for Product Design, Development and
Research.
Babcock & Wilcox Co., New York,
N.Y.-B.S. in Chem., Ind., Mech., & Met-
al. E., and Bus.A. graduates for Com-
pany-Wide Training Program.
Electro Metallurgical Co., Union Car-
bide and Carbon Corp., Niagra Falls,
N.Y.-B.S. & M.S. in Chem., Civil, Elect.,
Ind., Mech., & Metal. E., & Engr. Me-
chanics for Production, Works Engrg.,
Power, General Engrg., Purchasing,
Manufacturing Office, Research & De-
velopment.
Toledo Edison Co., Toledo, Ohio--
B.S. in Elect. & Mech. E. for Power
Production and Distribution.
Students wishing to make appoint-
ments with any of the above companies
should contact the Engineering Place-
ment Office, Ext. 2182, rm. 248 W. Eng.
A representative from the following
company will conduct personal inter-
views on campus at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments:
Fri., Oct. 22
Lehigh Portland Cement Co., Allen-
town, Pa.-Feb. or June men in Bus. Ad.
or L.S. & A. for Sales.
Students wishing to make appoint-
ments for interviews with the above
company should contact the. Bureau of
Appointments, Ext. 371, Rm. 3528 Ad-
ministration Bldg.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
The Gov. of the Virgin Is. of the U.S.,
Div. of Personnel, announces an exam
for Lab. T'echnician Supervisor. Re-
quirements include a B.S. in Chem. or
Bacteriology with at least one course
(Continued on Page 4)

Cars Priced for the
Student's Pocket Book
1941 OLDSMOBILE SEDAN, ra-
dio and heater, $75.
1916 PONTIAC, 4 door, radio
and heater, $95.
1941 DE SOTO, 2 door, good
runner, $75.
1948 NASH CANVERTIBLE, $145.
1946, HUDSON SEDAN, $95.
1937 CHEVROLET, 2 door, $45.
1947 PLYMOUTH Convertible,
$195.
1951 HENRY J, $295.
1951 STUDEBAKER, $545.
Used Car Lots:
503 E. Huron, NO 2-3261
East Ann Arbor, corner of Packard
and Platt, NO 2-0171
Both lots open evenings till 9:00
) 78B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B
ATTENTION GLEE CLUB MEMBERS.
Size 40 tails, good shape, $30. Phone
NO 2-9016. )77B
MAN'S BICYCLE $15. New light and
fenders. Call NO 3-2862. )75B
1947 MERCURY Stationwagon, new
tires, new battery, radio and heater.
Motor in perfect condition, priced for
quick sale. NO 2-1587. )73B
SIX RATTAN CHAIRS, four rattan
tables, one rattan couch, Royal Vac-
uum cleaner with attachments, car-
pet sweeper, steel utility cabinet,
two chests of drawers, Croflex "D"
f 3.5 with flash and accessories, all
excellent condition, priced cheap for
quick sale. Dr. R. W. Deatrick, Uni-
versity Hospital or NO 3-2354 any-
time. )74B
FINISHED PINE DESK, plenty of
drawer and shelf space. Call NO 2-3724,
after six. )72B

FOR SALE
REASONABLE 35 MM Kodak Anastar,
f:3.5 lens, carrying case, excellent
conditio.n 215 Allen Rumsey, W.Q.,.
NO 2-4401. )71B
1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runs perfect, good top. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )64B
BENZ MOTORS
TIP-TOP CHOICE USED CARS
1951 DELUXE CHEVROLET, two
door, radio, heater, exception-
ally low mileage. Priced at
$795.
1950 DODGE four door, factory
installed heater, new tires,
$695.
1942 CHEVROLET, runs very well
ready to go, $95.
Open evenings till 8:00 P.M.
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-5525
)70B
DRAWING TABLE, $5.00. Call NO 2-1140
)68B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )69B
1949 STUDEBAKER, 4 door, maroon,
radio, heater, over-drive, real clean
car. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )65B
1949 FORD Custom Made radio, heater,
good rubber, real clean. See Smitty,
the big lot across from downtown-
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )61B
XMAS CARDS from $1.95 up. Represent-
ing National Detroit. 10% and 15%
discounts. Contact Bob McCarty, 301
Michigan House, W.Q., Mail only. )9I
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$8.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS APT. for four men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. +140. Inquire,
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )3C
FURNISHED HOUSE near Dexter. Piano.
Write 18800 Margaeta, Detroit 19, or
call KE 4-1281. 10D
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. $18 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
ROOM AND BOARD
HOME COOKING for men. Well bal-
anced meals. Rebates. 1319 Hill St.
Call NO 2-6422. )4E

HELP WANTED
STUDENT WHO DESIRES HOME with
family in exchange for household
duties. Private room and meals pro-
vided. Must like children. Call NO
3-3404. )8H
WANTED: Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Morning hours, very good sal-
ary. Route open in U. Terrace and
Hospital area. Call NO 2-3241.
STUDENTS WIVES wanted for part
time work either mornings or after-
noons. Apply in person, Goldman
Brothers Cleaners, 214 S. State St. )7H
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Ride to Purdue. any week-
end. Will share expenses anddriving.
Call Chuck Drake at the Alpha Delta
Phi house. )4G
PERSONAL
MAN trow away those books and dig
our crazy PARTY, tonight at 8:00
in the Union. It's in honor of a guy
called IKE!!! )14F
UNWANTED HAIR REMOVED FOR-
EVER by Electrolysis. Guaranteed--
Physicians references. Free demon-
stration. Call Miss Gagalis, NO 8-8384.
)18F
THE NEW YORKER is now available at
8c-yes 8c a copy to all students with
ID cards. Phone Student Periodical,
NO 2-3061. )20F
BUSINESS SERVICES
MIMEOGRAPHING -Reasonable rates.
NO 3-1754. Call between 1 and 6 p.m.
)5I
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
ialize in winter cottons and blouses,
wool soxs washed also. )8I
RADIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1%~ blocks 'east of East Eng. )481
MISCELLANEOUS
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Life ..............$3 (8 mo.)
Newsweek................ $2 (8 mos.)
New Yorker .............. $3 (8 mos.)
Sat. Eve. Post ........ $3.50 (35 wks.)
Time .................... $2 (8 mos.)
U. S. News...........$3.27 (44 wks.)
Phone Student Periodical, NO 2-3061,
days, eves.
The Theosophical Society
in Ann Arbor
presents
PUBLIC LECTURE
"MAN AND
HIS WORLD"
His relation to Philosophy, Science
and Religion.
What is his purpose in life.
His destiny.
These lecture are free and open
to those who are searching
for the TRUTH.
MICHIGAN UNION
Wed., October 13, 8:00 P.M.

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It's Getting Too
Late to Gamble!
This is the Final Week
for Senior Picture
Appointments.

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Ending
TODAY

1lI
-S1F 'ATlr

Eves. 75c
Mats. 50c

f ' -f A '.5~~

G M
General Meeting
STUDENT PLAYERS
for Fall production
"The Lady's Not For Burning"
Thurs., October 14, 8 P.M.-League

Th Academy Award Winner
o f "fromn Here To Eternity" gi~~ l E
Scores A New Hit!
sean t"I" HAYDEN
Released Thru UNITED ARTISTS
Also CARTOON - SPORT - NEWS

Sign Up on the Diag between 9 A.M. and
3 P.M. and at the Student Publications Build-
ing from 1 to 5 P.M.

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Ending
Thursday

Shows Daily
1, 3, 5, 7, 9P.M.

(Paid Political Advertisement)
See
Don Leonard
Michigan's next Governor
at
Ike's Birthday Party
(Paid Political Advertisement)

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